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  • 1.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Machado, Carla
    Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    da Costa, Sergio
    Mattiado, Robert
    Developing a maturity framework for sustainable operations management2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Berglund, Martina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Karltun, Johan
    Human, technological and organizational aspects influencing the production scheduling process2007In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 160-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study of scheduling work in practice addresses how the production-scheduling processes in four companies are influenced by human, technological, and organizational aspects. A conclusion is that the outcome of the scheduling process is influenced by the scheduler adding human capabilities that cannot be automated, by technical constraints in the scheduled production system and by the available scheduling software tools. Furthermore, the outcome is influenced not only by how the scheduling process is formally organized, but also by the scheduler's informal authority and the role taken to interconnect activities between different organizational groups. The findings from the study support a number of previous studies done on scheduling in practice whilst giving new insights into their interpretation. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Chen, Lujie
    et al.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Tang, Ou
    The relationship between disclosures of corporate social performance and financial performance: Evidences from GRI reports in manufacturing industry2015In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 170, p. 445-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether the corporate social performance affect the financial performance is still unclear in many manufacturing companies. We commonly expect, on one side, that profitable corporations have stronger incentives to reveal information on the social performance in order to improve their publicity; on the other hand, companies may face the fear of rising costs due to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities. With increasing concerns of CSR, it is timely to investigate the relationship between the disclosure of corporate social performance and the financial performance. In this paper with the above study objective, we use Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reports of 75 sample companies, collect evidences by applying the method of structured content analysis of the cases and attempt to identify this relationship. The corporate social performance is measured by the indicators according to the GRI guidelines, i.e. within the categories of Labor practices and decent work, Human Rights, Society as well as Product responsibility. Financial performance is measured by return on equity, sales growth and cash flow/sales ratio. Using statistical evaluation methods, our results indicate that the categories of Human Rights, Society as well as Product responsibility display a significant and positive correlation with the return on equity. Same conclusion also holds for many CSR indicators. Nevertheless, when examining the CSR practices across different manufacturing sectors, we have not observed significant differences. The study results are important for understanding the development and implementation of CSR practices in the manufacturing industry.

  • 4.
    Fazlollahi, Ariyan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems. Swedish Institute of Computer Science (RISE SICS), Box 1263, Kista, Sweden.
    Measuring the impact of enterprise integration on firm performance using data envelopment analysis2018In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 200, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, with rapidly developing technology and changing business models, organizations face rapid changes in both internal and external environments. To be able to rapidly respond to such changing environments, integration of software systems has become a top priority for many organizations. However, despite extensive use of software systems integration, quantitative methods for estimating the business value of such integrations are still missing. Using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and the microeconomic concept of marginal rates, this study proposes a method for quantifying the effects of enterprise integration on the firm performance. In the paper, we explain how DEA can be used to evaluate the marginal benefits of enterprise integration. Our proposed method is to measure and compare the productive efficiency of firms using enterprise integration, specifically by relating the benefits produced to the resources consumed in the process. The method is illustrated on data collected from 12 organizations. The defined method has a solid theoretical foundation, eliminating the need for a priori information about the relationship between different measures. Furthermore, the framework could be used not only to quantify the business value of enterprise integration, but also to estimate trade-offs and impacts of other subjective managerial goals on the results. The major limitation of the proposed method is the absence of a comprehensive theory relating IT architecture changes to organizational outcomes. The underlying model is strongly dependent on the relevancy and accuracy of the included variables, as well as number of data units, introducing uncertainties to the outcomes of the model.

  • 5.
    Lööf, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Heshmati, Almas
    Knowledge capital and performance heterogeneity: A firm-level innovation study2002In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 61-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is an empirical analysis of knowledge capital and performance heterogeneity at the firm level. We apply new econometric methods to extensive data on innovation and innovative activities in Swedish manufacturing. A number of interesting results emerge. First, the results show that knowledge capital, defined as the ratio of innovation sales to total sales, is found to be a significant factor contributing to performance heterogeneity among firms. This relationship holds even when we control for human capital, type of output, firm size. and the entry. merger., partial closure or exit of firms. Second. knowledge capital rises with innovation input. the firm's internal knowledge for innovation, and co-operation on innovation with domestic universities. Third, when controlling for differences in innovation investments and human capital, knowledge-intensive firms are not more innovative than labor-intensive or capital-intensive firms. Fourth, organizational rigidities in innovation projects and a lack of appropriate investment sources for innovative activities are found to have a negative impact on productivity. Finally, we find a positive association between an outspoken aggressive innovation strategy, customers and a firm's internal resources for innovation and the size of innovation investment.

  • 6. Machado, Carla Gonsalves
    et al.
    de Lima, Edson Pinheiro
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio Eduardo
    Angelis, Jannis Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Research Institute of Industrial Economy IFN, Sweden.
    Mattioda, Rosana Adami
    Framing maturity based on sustainable operations management principles2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 190, p. 3-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business sustainability integration is a complex task and strongly linked to operations management. In fact, sustainability based approaches demand operations management boundaries' expansion, creation and integration of new performance goals into traditional company's performance management system, and new criteria and policies for operations' decision areas development. The challenge is to conduct more sustainable operations through companies' value chain and their operations network. Maturity models have been used in different areas as a process improvement and change management model for complex contexts. In sustainable operations management area, maturity models have been developed for specific purposes, e.g., sustainable production, sustainable supply chain management, corporate social responsibility, and life cycle management. However, there is a lack of models that considers sustainability integration through the evolution of sustainable operations' capabilities in an integrated way. Based on literature review and results from two panel studies conducted with academics and practitioners, this paper proposes a maturity framework for sustainability integration guided by sustainable operations capabilities evolution. The findings pointed out that its is possible to identify an evolutionary path, which goes from an initial approach focused in compliance aspects and firm's value. protection to an innovative approach, based on corporate social responsibility supporting operations' integration in a sustainable system, and long-term values development. The experts' studies identified key processes that need to be prioritized in each level, and also evaluate the adaptation of some elements from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) to sustainable maturity framework design. The framework represents company's vision regarding its value chain and operations network, and it is indicated for manufacturing companies.

  • 7. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Linking operations and strategy through performance measurementsIn: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Munik, Juliano
    Performance measurement systems: A consensual analysis of their roles2013In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 146, no 2, p. 524-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Competitive pressures and advances in product and process technologies challenge performance management systems in terms of their design and their strategic and operational use. Understanding the roles of such systems is a first step in developing and employing the appropriate system capabilities and functions. This paper first identifies the roles a performance measurement system can perform. A synthesis is then used to capture expert views through interviews and a Delphi exercise. Twenty international operations management experts participated in the study-eleven academics and nine industry professionals. The study resulted in a refined list of proposed roles of performance measurement systems from the existing operations literature. The findings from the study show that continuous improvement, organisational learning and change management are new elements that characterise the refined measurement system roles, and that the appropriate PMS roles are contingent on design recommendations. The study provides insights for the design, management and use of PMS in organisations.

  • 9.
    Visnjic, Ivanka
    et al.
    ESADE Business School.
    Jovanovic, Marin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.
    Andy, Neely
    University of Cambridge.
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    What brings the value to outcome-based contract providers? Value drivers in outcome business models2017In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, p. 169-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcome-based contracts (OBCs) are frequently seen as the most advanced level of service offering that product firms offer. To deliver OBCs, product firms have to shift from the traditional product business model (PBM) to adopting an outcome business model (OBM). This constitutes a major change that rearranges their activity system and therefore profoundly changes their value-creation process. The literature tells us little about what this change entails and the key value drivers that OBC providers focus on as they adopt outcome business models. To tackle this topic, we study four global capital equipment manufacturers that recently started to offer highly advanced forms of OBC: Bombardier, Caterpillar, Hitachi and Rolls Royce. We learn that, apart from recognized value drivers, such as efficiency, novelty, lock-in and complementarity, OBC providers draw value from what we have labelled accountability value. Second, the value drivers are more diverse in OBMs than in traditional PBMs. Third, while in PBMs there is a trade-off between value drivers, in OBMs value drivers are mutually reinforcing, as they create a synergistic interplay. At the same time, however, firms are exposed to some sources of value loss as they start providing OBCs and shift to OBMs. We contribute to the literature by connecting the OBM literature with the broader value-creation literature and identifying (specific) value drivers as they appear in the OBM context, as well as the relationships among them.

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