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  • 1.
    Angelis, Jannis
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Strategic Management of Global Manufacturing Networks2015In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 26, no 13, p. 1162-1163Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Birkie, Seyoum Eshetu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy.
    Trucco, Paolo
    Understanding dynamism and complexity factors in engineer-to-order and their influence on lean implementation strategy2016In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 345-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complexity and dynamism are considered intrinsic features of engineer-to-order (ETO) business environment; it is, therefore, important to understand and manage them better. Based on empirical investigation into two case companies, this paper expands the existing literature on how and why complexity and dynamism context factors constitute not only external business environment issues but also subfactors within the boundary of the firm. It argues that most of the subfactors for complexity and dynamism identified for repetitive manufacturing are relevant for the high uncertainty capital goods manufacturing ETO with some exceptions such as short product life cycle and technological turbulence. A framework of configuration (on implementation of lean practices), and moderation (on the lean-operations performance relation) forms of influence from dynamism and complexity is proposed. Further arguments to be verified in future large-scale research include: (1) dynamism bears challenges, and complexity provides opportunities to foster implementation of relevant lean practices in ETO, (2) both complexity and dynamism positively mediate better operations performance and enriched value from implemented lean practices.

  • 3.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Bengtsson, L
    Invest or divest?: On the relative improvement potential in outsourcing manufacturing2008In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 212-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study sought to clarify the comparative effect of outsourcing in relation to alternative manufacturing practices. A representative sample of 267 Swedish manufacturing plants was subjected to multiple regression analysis. Results show that in comparison to outsourcing manufacturing, the other practices related to the enhancement of manufacturing capability had a much stronger ability to predict improvements in operating performance. While investments in higher manufacturing capability have only positive effects, outsourcing may entail negative as well as positive effects on operating performance. For the most part, outsourcing leads to negative effects when used as the main strategy to improve performance, but is more likely to cause positive effects if concurrent initiatives are taken to develop manufacturing capabilities. Thus it is argued that there is a far greater performance improvement potential in investing in, rather than divesting, the manufacturing function. Outsourcing is mainly beneficial when used to free resources in order to invest in higher manufacturing capability.

  • 4.
    Dwaikat, Nidal Yousef
    et al.
    An Najah Natl Univ, Ind Engn Dept, Nablus, Palestine State, Palestine..
    Money, Arthur H.
    Univ Reading, Henley Business Sch, Reading, Berks, England..
    Behashti, Hooshang M.
    Radford Univ, Dept Management, Radford, VA 24142 USA..
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    How does information sharing affect first-tier suppliers' flexibility?: Evidence from the automotive industry in Sweden2018In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 289-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the critical research issue of how supplier delivery performance can be enhanced by integrating information sharing into volume and delivery flexibility. This study developed a research model to relate information sharing on demand forecasts and inventory data between original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and first-tier suppliers. Based on a sample of 52 suppliers from automotive industry in Sweden, partial least squares structural equations modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to assess the model. The results confirm that sharing demand forecasts is a key enabler of supplier volume and delivery flexibility while sharing inventory data is not. The study contributes to enlarging the knowledge about supply chain management from the suppliers' perspective. It also contributes to knowledge by validating the conceptual model and operationalisation of constructs. The study also has practical contribution in which management should focus on improving communication and collaboration practices with OEMs for effective sharing of demand forecasts.

  • 5.
    Feldmann, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Olhager, Jan
    Lund Univ, Dept Ind Management & Logist, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    A taxonomy of international manufacturing networks2019In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 30, no 2-3, p. 163-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing firms with multiple product groups do not need to involve all factories in the production of all product groups. Some factories may specialize on a small set of products, while others participate in the manufacturing of a broader set of products. However, current theories on international manufacturing networks do not explain in detail how organizations design international manufacturing networks for different products or product groups involving different sets of factories. This research investigates 20 product group networks at five global manufacturing firms. We distinguish between three types of factories: component manufacturing factories, assembly factories, and integrated factories (having both component manufacturing and assembly). Furthermore, we identify four network types: linear, divergent, convergent, and mixed structures. These four types exhibit distinctly different characteristics in terms of key characteristics, factory roles, product types, process types, market types, sourcing, and key managerial challenges. Most networks are relatively small - on an average consisting of four factories and some contain a number of subnetworks that are self-sufficient in terms of material flow and serve separate market regions. We identify two new types of factory roles related to component manufacturing competences, which we call 'strategic feeder' and 'full lead'.

  • 6.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    et al.
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Kramer, Mark
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    Logistics, Decisions and Informatics, Wageningen University.
    Wijdemans, Jeroen
    Information Technology, Wageningen University.
    A chain game for distributed trading and negotiation2003In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 111-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Karltun, Johan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping, JTH.
    Berglund, Martina
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Contextual conditions influencing the scheduler's work at a sawmill2010In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 359-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This case study addresses the issue of how contextual conditions influence scheduling work in practice at a sawmill in Sweden. Based on observations and interviews, activity analysis was used to study the work activities of the main scheduler. It is shown how the contextual conditions related to constraints, either in the technical system and the technical scheduling tools used by the scheduler or in the social system, delimit the possible ways for the scheduler to perform his work. It is furthermore illustrated how the scheduler sometimes used the contextual conditions as a means to control the sawmill production. Moreover, the presence of the numerous uncertainties in the production process is shown. Finally, the study demonstrates that the scheduler's thorough knowledge, experience, and skills of both the technical and the social systems had immense influence in his ability to perform during daily scheduling work.

  • 8.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Information Technology Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Hofstede, Gert Jan
    Wageningen University.
    Beers, George
    Wageningen University.
    Omta, S.W.F. (Onno)
    Wageningen University.
    Trust and Tracing game: learning about transactions and embeddedness in a trade network2006In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 569-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a gaming simulation, the Trust and Tracing game, for learning about the relation between social structure and the co-ordination of transactions in a trade network. This paper describes experiences from 15 sessions with the game. Its model allows the use of network and market coordination mechanisms by participating groups. During debriefing participants typically indicated they learned that prior relationships were more important to the course of the session than economic theory predicts. Number of participants, language barriers, nationality, perceived group membership, and prior experience determined which transaction governance mechanism emerged in the game.

  • 9. Petersen, S. A.
    et al.
    Divitini, M.
    Matskin, Mihhail
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Software and Computer Systems, SCS.
    An agent-based approach to modelling virtual enterprises2001In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 224-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how virtual enterprises (VEs) can be modelled using the AGORA multi-agent architecture, designed for modelling and supporting cooperative work among distributed entities. The model consists of a structure of AGORAs and agents, where AGORAs are facilitators of cooperative work for agents and the agents represent the partners of the VE, the cooperative mechanisms and the service providers. The distributed and goal-oriented nature of the VE provides a strong motivation for the use of agents to model VEs. The main advantages of this approach are that the structure of AGORAs provides a homogeneous modelling environment throughout the life cycle of the VE, traceability of the VE activities and a history of the VE. In addition to these, it is important to point out that, agents being computational entities, the resulting model provides an easy and efficient passage from the model to the computational support that is required by the VE.

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