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  • 1.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Macintyre, Mairi
    Parry, Glenn
    Discretion and complexity in customer focused environments2012In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 466-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Operations have traditionally focused on reductive analysis; transactional processes open to mass-customisation and standardisation. This study proposes that service complexity created by extensive ‘reasonable’ customer demand limits the ability to standardise and manage systems through mass-customisation. Beyond mass-customisation we propose management is by discretion. Discretion is difficult, if not impossible to codify, so operations are ‘managed’ via framework principles that also are difficult to replicate and provide a source of sustainable competitive advantage. The study furthers the servitisation discussion through a public sector services case.

  • 2. Czarniawska, Barbara
    et al.
    Metzger, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Managing overflows: How people and organizations deal with daily overflows2017In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 35, no 6, p. 711-711Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Czarniawska, Barbara
    et al.
    Metzger, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wieczorkowska-Wierzbinska, Grazyna
    Managing overflows: How people and organizations deal with daily overflows2017In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 91-91Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Lulea Univ Technol, Entrepreneurship & Innovat Res Grp, SE-97187 Lulea, Sweden..
    Richtner, Anders
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Management & Org, SE-11383 Lulea, Sweden..
    Brattstrom, Anna
    Lund Univ, Sch Econ & Management, Dept Business Adm, Box 117, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Opportunities and challenges in the new innovation landscape: Implications for innovation auditing and innovation management2019In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 151-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation auditing is a well-established practice used by managers to identify strengths and weaknesses in innovation. Existing audit frameworks fall short, however, because they neglect three major trends that currently transform the innovation landscape. These trends are as follows: 1) a shift from closed to more open models of innovation ("openness"), 2) a shift from providing physical products to industrial product services ("servitization"), and 3) a shift from an analog to a highly digitalized world ("digitalization"). This article identifies new innovation practices, opportunities, and challenges that arise for manufacturing firms along these trends. The article proposes a revised innovation audit framework, which acknowledges these trends and supports innovation management in increasingly dynamic and competitive environments. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 5. Peppard, J.
    et al.
    Rylander, Anna
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    From Value Chain to Value Network: Insights for Mobile Operators2006In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 24, no 2-3, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of a value chain has assumed a dominant position in the strategic analysis of industries. However, the value chain is underpinned by a particular value creating logic and its application results in particular strategic postures. Adopting a network perspective provides an alternative perspective that is more suited to New Economy organisations, particularly for those where both the product and supply and demand chain is digitized. This paper introduces the value network concept and illuminates on its value creating logic. It introduces Network Value Analysis (NVA) as a way to analyse competitive ecosystems. To illustrate its application, the provision of mobile services and content is explored to identify potential strategic implications for mobile operators.

  • 6. Peppard, J.
    et al.
    Rylander, Anna
    Using an Intellectual Capital Perspective to Design and Implement a Growth Strategy: the Case of APiON2001In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 510-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses the case of telecommunications software company APiON to illustrate how the company developed and implemented a growth strategy that allowed it to realize a dramatic increase in shareholder value through proactively focusing on harnessing its intellectual capital (IC) resources. Having surveyed the literature on value creation, categorizing it under financial and economic, strategic, managerial action, and resource-based perspectives, the paper notes that a major criticism that can be leveled at all these perspectives is that they are weak in identifying specific actions and in mobilizing organizational resources to increase shareholder value. Even resource-based theory (RBT) focuses on the development and protection of valuable resources rather than on providing a theory of 'resources in action'. The IC perspective has emerged alongside RBT as a complementary viewpoint but has a distinctive practitioner bent emphasizing resource accumulation and deployment in the value creation process. This paper presents the key tenets, concepts and language of the IC perspective, illustrating its implementation using the case of APiON. It closes with some lessons and implications for knowledge intensive businesses

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