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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Hellerstedt, Karin
    Location Attributes and Start-ups in Knowledge-Intensive Business Services2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 103-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines start-ups in knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS) across Swedish regions by individuals with a formally recognized capacity to produce and develop advanced business services. The empirical analysis focuses on whether their involvement in entrepreneurship may be explained by location attributes. As much as 75 percent of the KIBS founders have prior work experience from business services, suggesting that KIBS start-ups are more frequent in regions where the KIBS sector is already large. Controlling for the stock of potential entrepreneurs and the stock of KIBS firms, it is shown that variables reflecting both supply-side conditions and market size influence KIBS start-up activity. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that KIBS entrepreneurship in a region is stimulated by the simultaneous presence of (i) knowledge resources conducive for the generation and diffusion of knowledge and ideas upon which new firms can be established and (ii) a large market.

  • 2.
    Baum, Christopher F.
    et al.
    Boston Coll, Boston, MA USA.;DIW, Berlin, Germany..
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). ..
    Nabavi, Pardis
    Minist Finance, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Innovation strategies, external knowledge and productivity growth2019In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 348-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies firms ' capability to recombine internal and local knowledge. It measures the outcome in terms of total productivity growth. Using Swedish data on commuting time for face-to-face contacts across all 290 municipalities, we employ a time-sensitive approach for calculating localized knowledge within a municipality and and its close neighbors. Internal knowledge is captured by register data on firms' innovation intensity. The two sources of knowledge are modeled in a production function setting by discrete composite variables with different combinations of input factors. Applying the model on Swedish firm level panel data, we find strong evidence of differences in the capacity to benefit from external knowledge among persistent innovators, temporary innovators and non-innovators. The results are consistent regardless of whether innovation efforts are measured in terms of the frequency of patent applications or the level of R&D investment.

  • 3.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    Department of Economic Studies, Faculty of Economics, G. d'Annunzio University, Pescara, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, Daniele
    Department of Public Health, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 631-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are investigated—the degree (i.e. size) of individuals' networks of ideation relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Previous research has presented different and even conflicting empirical results concerning the effect of structural holes on innovation activities, and has not dealt specifically with the ideation phase of the innovation process. By drawing upon an idea database from a Swedish company that has worked systematically with idea management for an extensive period, this study investigates the interrelationship between social capital and ideation. The empirical study reveals that the larger the size of an individual's ego network, the higher is this individual's innovative performance in terms of high-quality ideas, whereas the larger the number of structural holes in an ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual in question. These findings support the conclusion that social capital, in terms of individuals' relationships with fellow employees within firms, has a positive influence on idea-generating behavior. Moreover, the results reveal that the presence of structural holes is negative for ideation performance, thus providing important new input to the recent debate on the interrelationship between structural holes and innovation in general.

  • 4. Bogers, M.
    et al.
    Zobel, A. -K
    Afuah, A.
    Almirall, E.
    Brunswicker, S.
    Dahlander, L.
    Frederiksen, L.
    Gawer, A.
    Gruber, M.
    Haefliger, S.
    Hagedoorn, J.
    Hilgers, D.
    Laursen, K.
    Magnusson, Mats G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Majchrzak, A.
    McCarthy, I. P.
    Moeslein, K. M.
    Nambisan, S.
    Piller, F. T.
    Radziwon, A.
    Rossi-Lamastra, C.
    Sims, J.
    Ter Wal, A. L. J.
    The open innovation research landscape: established perspectives and emerging themes across different levels of analysis2017In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 8-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview of the main perspectives and themes emerging in research on open innovation (OI). The paper is the result of a collaborative process among several OI scholars–having a common basis in the recurrent Professional Development Workshop on ‘Researching Open Innovation’ at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. In this paper, we present opportunities for future research on OI, organised at different levels of analysis. We discuss some of the contingencies at these different levels, and argue that future research needs to study OI–originally an organisational-level phenomenon–across multiple levels of analysis. While our integrative framework allows comparing, contrasting and integrating various perspectives at different levels of analysis, further theorising will be needed to advance OI research. On this basis, we propose some new research categories as well as questions for future research–particularly those that span across research domains that have so far developed in isolation.

  • 5.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Regional Specialization and Universities: The new versus the old2008In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 253-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether there is a correspondence between a university's research specialization and industrial specialization in the region hosting the university, and to what extent universities influence regional productivity. Moreover, the analysis seeks to answer if a difference can be detected between the influences of old and new universities on regional performance. To achieve this end we utilize a unique data set on spatially disaggregated data for Sweden in the period 1975-99. A two-step Heckman regression analysis is implemented to examine whether universities' research specialization matches regional specialization in production as compared to the average region. The results suggest a correspondence in specialization, as well as positive productivity effects. However, there are also considerable differences across regions, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities.

  • 6.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Economics.
    Specialization of Regions and Universities: The New Versus the Old2008In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 253-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes whether there is a correspondence between a university's research specialization and industrial specialization in the region hosting the university, and to what extent universities influence regional productivity. Moreover, the analysis seeks to answer if a difference can be detected between the influences of old and new universities on regional performance. To achieve this end we utilize a unique data set on spatially disaggregated data for Sweden in the period 1975-99. A two-step Heckman regression analysis is implemented to examine whether universities' research specialization matches regional specialization in production as compared to the average region. The results suggest a correspondence in specialization, as well as positive productivity effects. However, there are also considerable differences across regions, albeit primarily unrelated to the age of the universities.

  • 7.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Johansson, dan
    Determinants of Spatial Concentration of production in Sweden 1975-1993: Linkages, Scale Economies or Trade Cost?2003In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Braunerhjelm, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Johansson, Dan
    Determinants of spatial concentration of production in Sweden 1975-1993: Linkages, scale economies or trade costs2003In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 10, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics.
    McKelvey, Maureen
    Sandström, Christian
    Investing in localised relationships with universities: what are the benefits for R&D subsidiaries of multinational enterprises?2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of a long-standing interest in the distribution of knowledge spillovers from university research, there is only limited theoretical understanding of if and when opportunities to interact with a research university constitute a significant force of attraction for globally mobile investment in RD. Based on an empirical investigation of the benefits of interaction with universities, this paper proposes an analytical framework and four ideal types of strategy for localised collaboration between RD subsidiaries and universities. This taxonomy, which largely transcends industry sectors, and the illustrative cases presented in this paper provide insights into the potential scope for localised university-industry interaction from the perspective of multinational enterprises. By connecting the empirical results to the question whether these benefits are significant enough to enhance a region's attractiveness as a location for RD, we are able to develop a better understanding of the alternative strategies for policymakers and university leaders interested in stimulating such linkages.

  • 10.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    McKelvey, Maureen
    Sandström, Christian
    Investing in Localized Relationships with Universities: What are the Benefits for RD Subsidiaries of Multinational Enterprises?2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of a long-standing interest in the distribution of knowledge spillovers from university research, there is only limited theoretical understanding of if and when opportunities to interact with a research university constitute a significant force of attraction for globally mobile investment in RD. Based on an empirical investigation of the benefits of interaction with universities, this paper proposes an analytical framework and four ideal types of strategy for localised collaboration between RD subsidiaries and universities. This taxonomy, which largely transcends industry sectors, and the illustrative cases presented in this paper provide insights into the potential scope for localised university-industry interaction from the perspective of multinational enterprises. By connecting the empirical results to the question whether these benefits are significant enough to enhance a region's attractiveness as a location for RD, we are able to develop a better understanding of the alternative strategies for policymakers and university leaders interested in stimulating such linkages.

  • 11. Colombo, M. C.
    et al.
    Laursen, K.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rossi-Lamastra, C.
    Organizing Intra- and Inter-firm Networks: What is the Impact on Innovation Performance?2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Colombo, Massimo G.
    et al.
    Laursen, Keld
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Rossi-Lamastra, Cristina
    Organizing Inter- and Intra-Firm Networks: What is the Impact on Innovation Performance? Introduction2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 531-538Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gustavsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Globalisation of corporate knowledge formation: enabling proximity through organisational coordination mechanismsIn: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper connects to a stream of literature that emphasises the importance of effective utilization of dispersed knowledge in the MNC organisation. It also connects to the recent developments of the proximity concept, primarily driven by economic geographers. The paper seeks to contribute further to our understanding of the relationship between proximity and the management of corporate knowledge formation. In particular, the intention is to review the organisational coordination mechanisms and their potential to create additional dimensions of proximity than the geographical proximity that comes with co-location of corporate activities. From both theory and empirical studies it can be concluded that proximity matters, also in long-distance relationships. However, the findings in this study disagree with the strong focus on (permanent) geographical proximity. Drawing on the experiences of distributed R&D from a case study of a Swedish-based multinational company, the paper points to the role of coordination mechanisms as an important tool to create other dimensions of proximity in the distributed organisation.

  • 14. Holmén, M
    et al.
    McKelvey, M
    Magnusson, Mats
    What are innovative opportunities?2007In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 27-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand and explain processes of economic transformation, this paper proposes a new concept, “innovative opportunities”. Our interpretation of opportunities is based on an understanding of innovation in a business context, stressing perception and uncertainty during the choices involved in innovation processes. Based on Schumpeterian views of economic transformation, innovative opportunities refer to a set of different elements within the processes whereby actors identify, act upon and realize new combinations of resources and market needs to try to benefit from their future economic potential. To better understand and explain such processes, the proposed conceptualization of “innovative opportunities” consists of three elements: (1) economic value; (2) mobilization of resources; and (3) appropriability, which goes beyond existing types of opportunity conceptualizations found in the literature. The concluding discussion returns to the question of how this view of innovative opportunities modifies the existing understanding of innovation activities and industrial dynamics, and helps us identify new areas of research.

  • 15.
    Lööf, Hans
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jonkoping Int Business Sch; Lund Univ.
    R&D Strategy, Metropolitan Externalities and Productivity: Evidence from Sweden2014In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 141-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the influence of metropolitan externalities on productivity for different types of long-run R&D engagement based on information from the Community Innovation Survey. We apply a dynamic general method of moments model to a panel of manufacturing and service firms with different locations in Sweden, classified as a metropolitan region, the largest metropolitan region, a metropolitan city, the largest metropolitan city and a nonmetropolitan area. This analysis generates three distinct results. First, the productivity premium associated with persistent R&D is close to 8 per cent in nonmetro locations and about 14 per cent in the largest city. Second, a firm without any R&D engagement does not benefit at all from the external milieu in metro areas. Third, no productivity premium is associated with occasional R&D effort regardless of the firm's location.

  • 16.
    Mohammadi, Ali
    et al.
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Franzoni, Chiara
    Politecnico di Milano, Italy.
    Inventor’s Knowledge Set as the Antecedent of Patent Importance2014In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 65-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the antecedents of patent importance by looking at the prior knowledge set of academic inventors. Using independent methodologies, we distinguish between the scientific knowledge set and the technical knowledge set, and separate these from other kinds of prior expertise. We find that the patents of the inventors who have a prior scholarly knowledge of the topic are on average more important (more cited after 6 years). Conversely, we find an inverted U-shape relationship between prior technical relatedness and patent importance. These results are potentially useful to support the work of practitioners such as university technology managers, which often face difficulties in identifying the importance and perspective value of the disclosed inventions, amid high market and legal uncertainty and budget shortages.

  • 17.
    Nuur, Cali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Gustavsson, Linda
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics (Closed 20130101).
    Promoting regional innovation systems in a global context2009In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 123-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the innovation systems (IS) concept was coined in the late 1980s, it has been accepted as a mechanism of economic and technological development in policy circles. This recognition follows a change in our understanding of the characteristics of the innovation process as a non-linear process and having a systemic character. This changed understanding is also reflected in the movement in policy focus from science and technology (S&T) policy towards innovation policy. In recent years, the IS approach has been downscaled from the national level (NIS) to the regional level (RIS), a system's level that has gained the interest of policy makers. There are many rationales for this regionalization of innovation policy. However, as this paper points out, there are several challenges to implement an IS policy on the regional level. Based on a case study of a Swedish regional policy programme, this paper highlights (some of) the challenges related to defining the regional system's domain, implementing functional regions and securing sufficient regional knowledge infrastructure. This paper argues that when the IS approach is put into policy practice and downscaled to the regional level, it stands the risk of losing its strength as a tool for coping with the structural problems connected to innovation and globalization. Based on the identified challenges, the paper is concluded with a number of more general policy implications for IS-based policies with regional intentions.

1 - 17 of 17
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