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  • 1.
    Bredican, John
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    App Service: How do consumers perceive the quality of financial Service Apps on smart devices?In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps on smart devices such as phones and tablets have enabled financial services firms to not only provide greater convenience and flexibility to customers, but also to get them to do a lot of the work entailed in these services. This has changed the character of service in many ways, including the nature of service quality where service is no longer delivered by people, but by means of technology. The study reported here used an amended version of the SERVQUAL instrument to assess consumers’ perception of the quality of the service delivered by the apps of their financial services providers. Three dimensions of app service quality emerge: reliability, personal and visibles. Generally, consumers are reasonably satisfied with the quality of service provided by their financial apps, and prefer them to visits to service providers physical locations, and rate them as highly as online service provision on PCs or laptops. Limitations are acknowledged, managerial implications drawn and avenues for future research are identified.

  • 2.
    DesAutels, Philip
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology .
    Berthon, Pierre
    Bentley University.
    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Rising to the challenge: A model of contest performance2011In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 16, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contests are a ubiquitous form of promotion widely adopted by financial services advertisers, yet, paradoxically, academic research on them is conspicuous in its absence. This work addresses this gap by developing a model of contest engagement and performance. Using motivation theory, factors that drive participant engagement are modeled, and engagement's effect on experience and marketing success of the contest specified. Measures of contest performance, in-contest engagement and post-contest enduring interest are included. From the model, propositions are developed. Overall, the model provides financial service marketers with a theory-based foundation for designing and operating successful contests.

  • 3.
    Du Preez, Rose
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Internal branding experiences in the financial services sector in South Africa2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is little doubt that employees are critical to the delivery of the service brand. Although existing models propose methods of internal branding, very little is known about the actual corporate experience. Academics around the world have spent decades probing internal marketing, its subset-internal branding-and the impact of internal branding on service delivery. This research focuses on how organisations execute internal branding, revealing critical success factors as well as obstacles encountered. The research was conducted in five large organisations in the financial services sector in South Africa. Each organisation is a highly recognisable consumer brand; the oldest of which is nearing 200 years of being in business and the youngest is just 20 years old. This research adds to the body of knowledge regarding organisational practice of internal branding. Key themes are identified, three of which are largely absent from extant models and literature.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Söderberg, Inga-Lill
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Customers ’ ways of making sense of a financial service relationship through intersubjective mirroring of others2010In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of relationships between buyer and sellers in marketingresearch is well established. This study contributes to relationship marketing (RM)research as it examines the microfoundations of fi nancial service buyer and sellerrelationships. The study uses intersubjective theory and a qualitative method with thepurpose of conceptualising the qualitatively different ways customers experience faceto-face interactions with a service provider. An empirical study is conducted to determine,based on the customer ’ s own words, what is experienced in the interaction between thecustomer and the provider. Findings from the empirical material show that not all personalinteractions between customers and a service provider, in this case a bank, can belabelled as relationships. Instead, what customers do perceive as a relationship is anencounter where the interaction entails symmetry in the way the customer and the providermirror each other. When customers receive a treatment in opposition to an expectationof intersubjectivity, they will not refer to the situation as a relationship and, subsequently,according to the underlying assumptions of RM, do not willingly engage in further businesswith the provider.

  • 5.
    Grant, Philip S.
    et al.
    KTH. 201-510 Chesterfield Ave, North-Vancouver, BC V7M 2L9, Sweden .
    Stiehler, Beate
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Boon, Edward
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. University of Brescia, Italy .
    Through bubbles and crises: An analysis of the Journal of Financial Services Marketing from 2000 to 20122013In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an analysis of all publications of the Journal of Financial Services Marketing (JFSM), from 2000 until the end of 2012. The objectives of this study were: (i) to compare the subjects covered by the journal with industry trends, and identify opportunities for future research, and (ii) to assess the journal's development over time and its influence in the field of financial services marketing. Data for this content analysis was collected manually from the publisher's Website and from each paper, and a grounded theory approach was used to group the papers into clusters based on emerging themes. The study indicates that JFSM has been successful in covering the industry's most important trends, including mobile banking, relationship management, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and service quality. A number of gaps were identified, in particular regarding mobile banking services and the impact of new online business models (for example, PayPal, crowdfunding, Bitcoin). These findings should assist JFSM's editorial board to determine its future direction, and offer readers insight into industry trends and the journal's role in covering them.

  • 6.
    Hullgren, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Banking advice on fixed or adjustable mortgage rates2012In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 227-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the mid-1990s, Sweden has experienced a period of rapidly rising property prices, and household indebtedness has kept an even pace. The choice between fixed and adjustable interest rates has become increasingly important. This article analyses mortgage rate advice issued by a bank adviser in monthly newsletters during the period 2001-2009, focusing on the content and searching for patterns that may be related to earlier findings. The banking advice is classified into two dimensions: the content and the strength of advice. We find that a large part of the advice suggests that borrowers divide their loans and choose both adjustable and fixed interest rates. Contrary to existing literature, there is no apparent association between the advice provided and interest rate trends (neither short-nor long-term trends). Nor do we find a significant association between the advice and the interest rate gap between fixed and variable rates. This finding implies that the advice in these newsletters was formulated on a rather unclear basis and was of limited use for borrowers.

  • 7.
    Humphrey, Stephen
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Recruiters and applicants: An exchange of words2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 94-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recruitment processes have become important for organisations and involve key decisions: whether to recruit, how and when to recruit, and who or 'what' to recruit. Despite the structured and systematic nature of recruitment, making sensible interpretations of the curriculum vitae (CV), interview performances and assessment centre results about the prospective employee remains an enormous challenge. Similarly, from the candidate's perspective, assessment of the organisation is equally complex. This article provides perspective of this potential 'initial contact' of prospective employees and organisations. The data used to inform this 'initial contact' for analysis is from the CV and the job advertisement. These documents can be used to investigate the 'match' between organisational and applicant requirements and offers; the information exchange. CVs uploaded to Websites by applicants were analysed. The same online sources were used for job advertisements. Using a software package, analysis revealed the most common words that organisations and applicants use to describe their experience, requirements and offerings. Specifically, results showed that applicants for marketing roles in financial services management often neglect the use of keywords demonstrating a low 'match' with advertisement requirements.

  • 8.
    Lilford, Neil
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Effect of respondents' personality on resistance to change and the sales force2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 9, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the Big-Five Personality dimensions on Resistance-to-change (RTC). The data from a sample of 200 sales people was collected from a large financial services firm in South Africa. Principal-components factor analysis, followed by Varimax rotation, was undertaken to test the factor structure and the internal validity of the measures employed. Correlation analysis was undertaken to determine whether insurance salespersons personality types are related to the reported levels of Resistance-to-Change. The results are reported, the limitations are noted, and directions for future research are indicated.

  • 9.
    Lilford, Neil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa .
    Nel, Deon
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Big Five personality traits and financial salesperson performance: An application of Chernoff faces2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the personality traits of effective sales people has been a long-standing challenge to sales managers and researchers in a wide range of contexts, from business to business, to retail and services. A definitive identification of the characteristics of the ideal salesperson remains elusive. We investigate the impact of the Big 5 personality traits on the performance of salespersons in a large financial services organization, our purpose being to graphically illustrate how personality traits differ, according to different levels of sales performance. We present the results graphically using Chernoff faces. The study demonstrates that this approach provides valuable insights to sales managers, and has several possible applications in relation to financial salesperson-performance management.

  • 10.
    Morrison, Stacey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Pitt, Leyland
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. Simon Fraser University, Canada.
    Kietzmann, Jan
    Technology and financial services: Marketing in times of U-commerce2015In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article revisits and uses the so-called U-Commerce framework to challenge financial services marketing decision makers to consider reformulating marketing objectives in an age of ubiquitous technological networks. It outlines the 4 U's of U-Commerce - ubiquity, universality, unison and uniqueness, and revisits the original framework used to conceptualize U-Commerce. Then it identifies and describes four broad marketing objectives that financial services marketers can strive for, including amplification, attenuation, contextualization and transcension. Four broad marketing strategies can be used to achieve these objectives, namely nexus marketing, sync marketing, immersion marketing and transcension marketing. Examples specific to financial services marketing are used to illustrate and discuss these strategies.

  • 11. Robson, K.
    et al.
    Beninger, S.
    Hall, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Attraction of marketing and sales professionals in the financial services industry: An analysis of pre-, during and post-financial crisis job postings2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attracting talent is key to a successful sales force, and financial services firms have long used online recruiting to achieve this. However, little is known about how firms attract financial services marketing and sales professionals. In this study, we present a content analysis of job postings for sales and marketing positions in the financial services industry that were posted before, during and after the financial crisis of 2008. Specifically, job postings in the United Kingdom and United States in 2006, 2009 and 2013 were examined. Implications for financial services firms are discussed.

  • 12.
    Sangari, Esmail S.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Personal selling and sales management in the marketing of financial services: Introduction to the special issue2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 71-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Söderberg, Inga-Lill
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Gender stereotyping in financial advisors assessment of customers2012In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 259-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a comparison of male and female advisors assessment of their customers. The findings from the empirical material, consisting of 361 advisors answers to a questionnaire, show significant evidence that advisors assess their customers differently depending not only on customer gender, but also according to their own gender. The investigated variables are the advisors assessment of consumers perception of their own risk tolerance, customer satisfaction with the advisor, customer trust in the advisor, customer likelihood to follow the advice given and advisors ratings of customer financial literacy. Male advisors rated consumers answers higher than did their female colleagues for all variables, with the exception of advisors ratings of consumer financial literacy. Advisors and their employers in the financial services industry, as well as policymakers, should be aware of the possible association between advisor gender and potential gender stereotyping of clients.

  • 14. Treen, E.
    et al.
    Pitt, L.
    Bredican, John
    Farshid, M.
    App service: How do consumers perceive the quality of financial service apps on smart devices?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apps on smart devices such as phones and tablets have enabled financial services firms not only to provide greater convenience and flexibility to customers, but also to get them to do a lot of the work entailed in these services. This has changed the character of service in many ways, including the nature of service quality where service is no longer delivered by people, but by means of technology. The study reported here used an amended version of the SERVQUAL instrument to assess consumers' perception of the quality of the service delivered by the apps of their financial services providers. Three dimensions of app service quality emerge: Reliability, personal and visibles. Generally, consumers are reasonable satisfied with the quality of service provided by their financial apps and prefer them to visits to service providers physical locations and rate them as highly as online service provision on PCs or laptops. Limitations are acknowledged, managerial implications drawn and avenues for future research are identified.

  • 15. Vella, J.
    et al.
    Wallström, Å.
    Farshid, Mana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Financial services Apps: What makes the difference between a great and a ghastly review?2017In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 132-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet as we know it, has entered a spiral of decline while mobile Apps are gradually taking over and are steadily changing the way we go about our individual daily lives. This study examines the fact that certain financial services Apps are far more successful than others, specifically by looking at what makes a user think that an App may be great, and give it a favorable review, or that it is rather ghastly, and give it an unfavorable review. Next, we describe a study of six of the most popular financial services Apps on the iTunes App Store, for which reviews were analyzed using DICTION software. Employing Diction variables, ambivalence and temporal terms were prevalent in negative reviews while accomplishment, motion, optimism and certainty, were predominantly expressed in positive reviews. Human interest, on the other hand, seemed to be uniformly distributed between both types of reviews.

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