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  • 1.
    Bigi, Alessandro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Treen, Emily
    Bal, Anjali
    How customer and product orientations shape political brands2016In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 365-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a theory of consumer and product orientation in the realm of political branding to illustrate how politicians can choose to position and present themselves to voters. It is evident that some politicians play an active role in shaping the beliefs and actions of their constituents, while others are more influenced by voter sentiment. The effectiveness of the political strategy is highly influenced by the market realities of the voting body in question. Design/methodology/approach - A dichotomy is presented to shed light on how consumer and product orientation might influence the way in which politicians choose to address the public. Specifically, four modified strategic orientation archetypes are presented and analyzed with particular focus on political brands and strategy. Findings - Product and consumer orientations have been shown to also be applicable to the strategic positioning of political brands. While it can be argued that no strategy is superior over another, careful consideration of the political environment in question and subsequent execution of an appropriate stance can be used to better manage the relationship between the electorate and politicians. Research limitations/implications - This study provides academics in this area with a comprehensive examination of strategic orientation literature in political contexts, and lays out a strong groundwork for future studies. In this burgeoning area of research, there are several opportunities for marketing and political strategy academics to dive deeper into the intricacies that drive politicians to adopt specific strategic orientations, and how these strategies evolve over time and in differing political environments. Practical implications - This analysis suggests that there are opportunities for political strategists to explore the relationship between the identified strategic orientations and political brands, and for political marketing scholars to investigate the modes of focus presented. Originality/value - This analysis provides better understanding of how politicians can influence voters and voters can influence political brands, and how the strategic orientation archetypes can be used to influence decisions about political strategy.

  • 2.
    Blair, Amanda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Atanasova, C.
    Pitt, L.
    Chan, A.
    Wallström, Å.
    Assessing brand equity in the luxury wine market by exploiting tastemaker scores2017In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 447-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Calculating brand equity, the price differential that a branded product is able to charge compared to an unbranded equivalent, often suffers from a lack of a means to truly determine equivalence. Luxury wines have the benefit of an established measure of equivalency – the Parker score. Robert Parker’s influence as a tastemaker provides a point of comparison across brands. This study looks at brand equity of Bordeaux classified growth wines considering château brands, growths and vintages to illustrate the intangible value for the consumer. Design/methodology/approach: Using price and wine-specific data from Wine-Searcher.com, an online database and search engine, an initial sample of 393 wines with Parker scores ranging from 72 to 100 is presented. A subset of perfect wines, with 100-point Parker scores, is also reviewed focusing on the great vintage of 2009. Findings: The results indicate that brand equity in the luxury wine market exists. Not only is this true for the brand of a specific château, but there is also equity associated with the vintage and the growth. Practical implications: This offers practical implications for brand managers in positioning their wines. Originality/value: An analysis of luxury wines supports the financial perspective on brand equity, especially when there is a viable means of determining equivalence, such as the Parker score.

  • 3.
    Chipp, Kerry Fiona
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Chakravorty, Devarpan
    Producer push to consumer pull: Who curates new media content? Developing strategies for new media environments2016In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 373-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This study aims to explore if, with increasing consumer empowerment, consumers are actively pulling content through a multitude of platforms rather than relying on media owners to dictate their product choices. How do media owners and content producers move toward a more reciprocal and interactive business strategy to deal with the change? Design/methodology/approach - The study was qualitative and exploratory in nature and utilized in-depth and semi-structured interviews of media consumers and experts. Findings - Consumer behavior has changed due to increased product control, in terms of type and occasion, across all income levels. The value of curatorship has increased and social media has fundamentally changed consumption patterns. Using the Berthon et al. model of response functions, we found that, content producers often suffer from inertia and operate with an Isolate strategy. The second most common approach is that of Follow or customer orientation. There is limited engagement with the innovation orientations of Shape and Interact. It is best for the industry to move toward an Interact model, accepting that consumers sometimes wish to create and at other times wish content to be effortlessly provided to them. Research limitations/implications - This study adopted a qualitative approach of industry experts and consumers within a single context. The further implications would be to develop the Interact strategy in more detail, especially toward the end of how to get media providers to change their current orientations. Practical implications - Business models of product producers in the new business environment seek to be more consumer-centric. This must not be done at the expense of an innovation orientation. Originality/value - There has been a lot of discussion on the need to change business models in the wake of changed consumer behavior. The current paper provides guidance on how to respond to the new media world.

  • 4.
    Du Preez, Rose
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Bendixen, M.
    Abratt, R.
    The behavioral consequences of internal brand management among frontline employees2017In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 251-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop and test a comprehensive model for the outcomes of internal brand management (IBM), linking it to brand citizenship behavior (BCB) and intention to stay (IS) through job satisfaction (JS) and brand commitment (BC). Design/methodology/approach: A comprehensive literature review is undertaken to develop the proposed model. The sample consists of three separate cases, a financial services firm, a multinational telecommunications company, both based in South Africa, and a regional grocery chain operating in the USA. Useable samples of 154, 96 and 241 were achieved for the three cases, respectively. In all cases, the majority of the respondents were customer contact employees. Findings: The structural models showed some surprising results, the major one being that brand proselytization is not a component of BCB. Despite using the same instrument, the levers that drive IBM were different in each of the three cases and different from previous studies. Research limitations/implications: The results of this research indicate that IBM and BCB are contextual. This implies that a universal instrument to measure these constructs has yet to be developed, representing an interesting avenue for future research. Practical implications: Regarding employees as internal customers and including them in various marketing initiatives and brand-orientated human resource practices (recruitment, induction and training) are key to a successful IBM program. Originality/value: A comprehensive model for the outcomes of IBM was developed and tested, linking it to BCB and IS through JS and BC. It is the first time that research has been conducted with customer contact employees only.

  • 5.
    Wilson, Matthew
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    When creative consumers go green: understanding consumer upcycling2016In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 394-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Consumers are known to repurpose products for uses other than those they were originally intended for; this paper aims to focus on an environmentally conscious form of creative consumption known as upcycling. Design/methodology/approach - This conceptual paper presents and defines the consumer practice of upcycling. Findings - The author identifies gaps in the literature regarding consumer upcycling and identifies avenues for future research and theory development. Research limitations/implications - Upcycling has considerable implications with respect to end-of-life planning for products. Originality/value - This research identifies consumer upcycling as an environmentally beneficial form of creative consumption and discusses its implications for firms.

  • 6.
    Åsberg, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Perceived brand portfolios: how individual views hamper efficiency2015In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 610-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceived content and structure of a brand portfolio, which may differ between individuals, by mapping the brand portfolio of two multi-national companies from the perspective of the marketing team. The discrepant views between individuals are analyzed and an aggregated brand portfolio is presented. Design/methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews with nine marketing professionals were used to map their individual perceived brand portfolios and structure, based on the Brand Concept Map methodology. Findings – The study finds that there is a consistent difference in the individual perceived brand portfolio between marketing professionals. Brands that are not supported by all stakeholders may be suffering from an unclear positioning or undesired associations, and should receive management attention. Research limitations/implications – Explanations for the results are offered and future research is suggested to determine the generalizability of the findings and the economic implications of discrepant views on the company’s brand portfolio. Practical implications – Marketing practitioners should consider the possible effects of conflicting views within their marketing teams on business performance. Identifying brands that are not supported by all stakeholders could be a way to discover under-performing brands with problematic brand positions in need of immediate attention. Originality/value – This study is the first to compare and fully map the differences in perception of a company’s brand portfolio among internal stakeholders and the possible implications of this discrepancy.

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