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  • 1.
    Angelis, Jannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Management.
    Jordahl, Henrik
    Research Institute of Industrial Economics IFN.
    Merciful yet effective elderly care performance management practices2015In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The study aims to compare management practices in private and publicly owned elderly care homes. The demands for cost-effective care combined with emphasis on client experience highlights the importance of appropriate management practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study utilises a survey of 500 homes covering management practices on monitoring, performance management and staff development. These are highly correlated, allowing for treating the practices both in aggregate and individually in the analysis. Additional questions capture information on site and management conditions.

    Findings – Management practices employed at the elderly care homes vary greatly, with high and low individual scores found in most homes. But private homes consistently score higher than public homes, especially when it comes to incentive practices. Also, elderly care homes of both ownership forms score at the top and bottom of each management practice. But looking at the average management score, there are fewer private homes that score really low and more private homes that score really high.

    Practical implications – The results identify given characteristics and maturity of the various management practices employed to plan and control operations in the elderly care homes and provides managerial and staff insights into their use.

    Originality/value – The application and impact of standard management practices has previously been limited in publicly funded services. Little is known about management practices in elderly care and whether the practices are associated with better performance.

  • 2.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring problem finding in a medical device company2012In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning in a medical device company aiming to identify opportunities for both incremental and radical innovation. The study seeks to address the present gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. Design/methodology/approach: The implementation and use of a systematic and collaborative approach for environmental scanning to support the identification and analysis of opportunities for radical and incremental innovation and its related challenges is described and analyzed. Experiences and observations from a single case study, conducted in an R&D organization in an international medical device company during two years forms the basis for the study. During 2009-2011 an empirical investigation at an R&D unit composed of 200 employees at a Swedish site in an international medical device company, known as a market and pioneering leader was conducted. A qualitative evaluation and analysis was utilized using the gathering of relevant data from specified documents and surveys, compilation of databases in use for external information search, observations during formal meetings and semi-structured interviews with individuals representing different departments and hierarchical levels to collect substantive and relevant data. Findings: The study points to the importance of balancing the degree of formalization in the process in order to motivate different individuals and to create learning and innovation outcomes. Research limitations/implications: The study contributes to the body of innovation management literature by providing empirical data on how companies are organizing work to systematically acquire and use information about events and trends in the external environment defined as environmental scanning as means for building innovation capabilities in practice. Practical implications: The selection of direction and scope of search, the design and implementation of the scanning process and IT tool, the mechanisms needed to integrate different hierarchical levels and functions to identify new ideas and strategy implications are found to be factors critical to manage. Originality/value: This study provides rich multi-level longitudinal empirical data and addresses the current gap in research on challenges associated with achieving a balance between exploration and exploitation on a micro level. It specifically contributes to the need to better understand how firms build capabilities to identify opportunities and problems in the early phases of product innovation when aiming to generate both radical and incremental innovations.

  • 3. Pinheiro de Lima, Edson
    et al.
    Gouvea da Costa, Sergio
    Angelis, Jannis
    Strategic performance measurement systems: A discussion about their roles2009In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical discussion about the roles that a performance measurement system should perform. The enterprises' operations systems and environments, characterized by their complexity and dynamics, are challenging the strategic operations management models. Design/methodology/approach - The developed theoretical construction is based on a literature review. The measurement system is studied in the context of a strategic operations management system. Findings - The structures, processes and spaces were the lens used to study the performance measurement system and contributed to organize the concepts in tables, that is, roles statements were created based on these guidelines. These tables synthesized and identified the main roles that the system should perform, stating their definitions and related perspectives. Research limitations/implications - The generated framework is theoretical in essence and needs to be tested, although the theoretical exercise showed a common sense around the articulated main concepts. Practical implications - The understanding of the performance measurement system roles contributes to improve design, implementation and use of the performance system. Originality/value - The paper's main contribution is the theoretical underpinning used to develop the performance framework. The system design approach used will enable further research into strategic performance measurement application for the design and use of such a system. Continuous improvement, organizational learning and the management of change process will be required properties for the strategic management of the operations function.

  • 4.
    Tangen, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Analysing the requirements of performance measurement systems2005In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 46-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Performance measurement is a subject that has been high on the agenda for over two decades. This article proposes making a contribution to this field by discussing how to deal systematically with all the requirements a performance measurement system (PMS) should fulfil. Design/methodology/approach - Different requirements suggested in the performance measurement literature from the past 20 years have been analysed in order to structure the different tasks to conduct designing a PMS. Findings - The article explains how to separate requirements that can be linked to a PMS and to an individual performance measure. It also suggests three system classes depending on what requirements a PMS fulfils. Finally a three-step procedure is proposed that describes how to evaluate and improve an existing PMS in a company. Practical implications - In practice, it is difficult to deal with numerous requirements simultaneously when designing a PMS. The article supplies measurement practitioners with tools to identify any priority important requirements. Originality/value - Several new ideas to the field of performance measurement are introduced and explained: the concept of system classes, classification of requirements and a simple three-step procedure to evaluate and improve PMS.

  • 5.
    Tangen, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Improving the performance of a performance measure2005In: Measuring Business Excellence, ISSN 1368-3047, E-ISSN 1758-8057, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 4-11Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss how to design an individual performance measure, which usually means the measurement practitioner must deal with many requirements other than the ones that can be found when designing a complete performance measurement system. Design/methodology/approach - Different requirements suggested in the performance measurement literature from the past 20 years have been sorted out in order to structure the different tasks to conduct when designing a measure. Findings - Explains how to form or select a formula that fulfils the purpose of a measure. Defines 15 parameters that fully specify a measure. Clarifies positive and negative measure properties. Practical implications - Measurement regimes are often built without a clear understanding of what is being measured. The article includes several practical tools that can be used when designing a performance measure. Originality/value - Discusses the question "how to measure?", while most of past research in the field has been aimed at solving "what to measure?".

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