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  • 1. Beyhan, B.
    et al.
    Rickne, Annika
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Entrepreneurship and innovation.
    Motivations of academics to interact with industry: The case of nanoscience2015In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 68, no 3-4, p. 159-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a special focus on the field of nanotechnology, this paper investigates motivations of academic scientists to interact with industry. The study is based on a survey of 181 nanoscientists from various disciplines and universities in Turkey. We identified three main motivations for interacting with industry: 1) to increase resources for academic research; 2) to learn from firms; 3) to commercialise research results. We found that in nanotechnology, commercialisation of research outcomes is an important motivation. In general, the importance of motivations differs according to the forms of engagement. Consulting is motivated by commercialisation while research-based interactions are driven by aims to commercialise or to learn from firms. Finding new financial resources for academic research is a strong impetus for informal interactions.

  • 2. Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Continuous improvement capability in the Swedish engineering industry2007In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 37, no 3-4, p. 272-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports findings from the Swedish part of the 2nd International Continuous Improvement Survey. Based on Bessant's evolutionary model of continuous improvement behaviour, the continuous improvement capability level of the Swedish engineering industry is estimated. The data analysis shows that there is a need for progression towards higher continuous improvement capability levels. Therefore, the specific abilities to develop in order to support such a move forward are clarified. In addition to being an illustration of manufacturing practices in Sweden from a continuous improvement perspective, this article contributes to the field of Operations Management by being the first attempt to replicate the work of Bessant via a large-scale survey study. The model is found valid and it shows that development of continuous improvement abilities contribute to the enhancement of plant performance.

  • 3. Hacklin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Inganaes, Martin
    Marxt, Christian
    Pluess, Adrian
    Core rigidities in the innovation process: a structured benchmark on knowledge management challenges2009In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 45, no 3-4, p. 244-266Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A changing industrial and technological environment implies a need for a diligent acquisition of dynamic capabilities. While tackling exogenous discontinuities is imperative for success, the problem often lies in the firms' internal processes, where existing core competences might deteriorate to core rigidities. The presented contribution is two-fold: first, a conceptual framework for assessing knowledge-related rigidities along the innovation process is introduced, which is derived from the stage-gate model for new product development. The innovation process is evaluated within cases of four industry firms, with emphasis on identifying problem areas, core rigidities and resulting challenges along the entire way from idea to market launch. Secondly, the challenges are clustered, providing a basis for deriving optimisation approaches, as well as summarised and compared across the cases. In all phases of the innovation process, the benchmark with other firms seems to ease the process of creating awareness on rigidities and to provide a basis for managerial improvement.

  • 4. Hacklin, Fredrik
    et al.
    Marxt, Christian
    Fahrni, Fritz
    An evolutionary perspective on convergence: inducing a stage model of inter-industry innovation2010In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 49, no 1-3, p. 220-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the past decade, the phenomenon of technological convergence has increasingly gained managerial attention. In particular, the phenomenon can be regarded as a special form of technological change, where the coming-together of previously distinct knowledge bases gives rise to the creation of new applications and business models. Since the resulting creative destruction may exceed previously established industry boundaries, as a consequence, convergence does not only promise the creation of new value, but may imply significant disruptions to established industries. Driven by a managerial need for understanding convergence from an innovation management perspective, as well as by contradictive perceptions in previous research, this paper introduces an evolutionary perspective on the phenomenon. The study is based on an inductive and embedded multiple-case approach, involving 26 firms in the information and communications industry sectors. Four different stages of a convergence process are identified, described and formalised: (1) knowledge convergence, (2) technological convergence, (3) applicational convergence and (4) industrial convergence.

  • 5.
    Helander, Max
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Bergqvist, Robert
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lund Stetler, Katarina
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Applying lean in product development - enabler or inhibitor of creativity?2015In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 68, no 1-2, p. 49-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lean has become increasingly popular as a process management approach outside its original application in manufacturing, and it is frequently used as a means to increase efficiency in research and development (R&D) processes. Previous research suggests that lean can be used to increase R&D efficiency, but there is disagreement on whether or not this comes at the expense of creativity. In this article, the effects of lean product development on creativity are studied by means of case studies in the R&D departments of five companies. The empirical observations highlighted a number of important aspects when applying lean in product development. The data suggested that a primary focus of lean in product development was flow, rather than waste reduction, and that significant focus was given to the reduction of disturbances. Another finding was the need for a long-term perspective in R&D to safeguard creativity and that the reduction of slack time following the implementation of lean clearly limited the opportunities to undertake unsanctioned innovation projects, often referred to as 'skunk work'. Finally, the importance of management support and employee training to aid the implementation of lean was emphasised.

  • 6. Lytras, Miltiadis D.
    et al.
    Ordonez de Pablos, Patricia
    Naeve, Ambjörn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Makropoulos, Constantin
    Kashyap, Vipul
    Knowledge Management within the Health, Pharmaceutical and Clinical Sectors: Towards patient-centric health care systems2009In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 47, no 1-3, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this short editorial we summarise the rationale of the special issue and we provide the basic contribution.

  • 7.
    Löfqvist, Lars
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Motivation for innovation in small enterprises2012In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 60, no 3/4, p. 242-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This study examines which factors motivate small enterprises to realise product innovations and how these factors affect their innovation processes. In a multiple embedded case study of three small enterprises, 11 different innovation processes, both realised and unrealised, were discovered and analysed. Strategy, competition, profit, growth, source of innovation idea, innovation process size and novelty were not found to explain the motivation to innovate, but ten interdependent motivating factors did, of which four externally oriented factors were found conclusive for innovation to occur. The factors found, dealing with resource scarcity, technology and market uncertainty and risk, and cash flow, highly affected how the innovation processes were carried out. The findings further show that the need to maintain steady cash flow seems to be the overall motive for product innovation in small enterprises.

  • 8.
    Magnusson, Mats
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Martini, A.
    Dual organisational capabilities: from theory to practice - the next challenge for continuous innovation2008In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 42, no 1-2, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's business environment poses a significant challenge to many firms, namely to continuously innovate, combining operational excellence with both steady-state and discontinuous innovation. At a closer look, it can also be seen that a number of leading firms today seem to be able to handle the resulting situation quite well, revealing good operational and innovation performance over time. At the same time, the bulk of management theory still approaches this problem with a trade-off perspective, implying that these aspects of business are analysed separately, and that efficiency and innovation have to be regarded as mutually excluding things to strive for - suggesting that firms can be good in one of the two abilities but not in both simultaneously. This points to a gap in existing research that scholars need to fill. Building on management literature about paradoxes and dualities, and using some examples from practice, this contribution stresses the 'practicability' of the duality perspective for Continuous Innovation research and practice.

  • 9.
    Magnusson, Mats
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Vinciguerra, E.
    Key factors in small group improvement work: an empirical study at SKF2008In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 44, no 3-4, p. 324-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common approach in continuous improvement programmes in manufacturing firms is that the bulk of the improvement activities is performed by small groups of shop-floor operators. The performance of these groups consequently is of great importance for the overall success of continuous improvement initiatives. Earlier research has among other things pointed out the importance of motivation, communication and leadership support for the work of these groups. However, there is still a lack of empirical studies of these factors in terms of their relative impact on performance and their inter-relationships. This paper addresses these issues based on an investigation of small improvement groups at three SKF factories in Sweden. Based on a combination of participatory studies, interviews and a survey to the leaders of the improvement groups, it was found that a key problem for improvement activities is motivation and teamwork, and that what characterises high-performing groups is their information-sharing and communication behaviours. This study also showed that other important factors to consider for this type of improvement work are goal-setting and feedback, as well as management support, both in terms of direct leadership in the improvement groups and in terms of support from other management levels, leading to a number of managerial implications.

  • 10. Martini, Antonella
    et al.
    Gastaldi, Luca
    Corso, Mariano
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Laugen, Björge Timenes
    Continuously innovating the study of continuous innovation: from actionable knowledge to universal theory in continuous innovation research2012In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 60, no 3-4, p. 157-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas there is a wealth of contributions on the topic of continuous innovation (CI) in firms, there is still a clear need for works addressing how the existing knowledge on combining various types of innovation with operational excellence and strategic flexibility in a fruitful manner. Any attempt to generate actionable knowledge about CI that at the same time lives up to the traditional academic requirements of rigor and relevance poses significant challenges to researchers, calling for a more comprehensive and multi-faceted methodological approach, attending to multiple evaluation criteria and possible revisions of research roles and processes. This paper aims to recommend how to produce CI actionable knowledge and to take the first steps in progressing from this form of knowledge to a universal theory of CI. In doing so, the paper calls for a 'continuous innovation' in the way CI research is accomplished, and aims at proposing some key building blocks and evaluation criteria of a basic framework able to overcome the pre-paradigmatic stage in which CI research seems to be stuck. Moreover, it presents four papers from the International CINet Conference held in 2007 Goteborg (SE) and one from the 2010 Zurich.

  • 11. Pasche, Maximilian
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Continuous innovation and improvement of product platforms2011In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 56, no 2-4, p. 256-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product platforms are applied in order to increase the stability of the product architecture and to reap benefits of scale and scope. However, many firms face a dynamic environment with quickly changing market demands. In such an environment, firms may have to continuously renew and improve their product platforms to achieve desired flexibility. The modifications comprise two types of innovations, component as well as architectural innovations. Combining these types to simultaneously achieve stability and strategic flexibility demands continuous innovation capability. This paper provides a viable approach to coordinate architectural and component innovations. The paper is based on a case study of an international truck manufacturer. Two major issues, decision-making and the management of knowledge, stand out as important for realising continuous innovation and improvement of product platforms. Moreover, product platform management needs to consider modularity and its related economies of substitution.

  • 12.
    Stefan, Ioana
    et al.
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Appropriability: A key to opening innovation internationally?2016In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 71, no 3-4, p. 232-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the tense appropriability-openness relationship, defined by some as paradox. Based on an international survey of 415 manufacturing firms, we investigate how the use of different kinds of intellectual property protection mechanisms (IPPMs) affects interfirm R&D collaboration while considering partner location in the analysis as well. Our results show that the use of formal, semi-formal or informal IPPMs has different effects on openness in terms of partner variety and depth of collaboration with academic partners, value chain partners and competitors. Moreover, when considering location we uncover previously hidden appropriability-openness liaisons showing that semi-formal or informal IPPMs are mainly valid in relation to national partners, whereas formal appropriability explains international collaborations. One implication of the study is that to better understand the appropriability-openness relationship it is imperative to differentiate between national and international settings. We further suggest that the potential paradox delineating this relationship has a geographical dimension.

  • 13.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the incorporation of users in an innovating business unit2013In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 61, no 3-4, p. 293-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of user involvement has long been stressed in the innovation management literature. However, we argue that this literature does not take sufficient account to the employment and incorporation of users in innovation. Hence, we explore the role of incorporated users in innovation activities. The research was conducted in a business unit in a large medical technology company with long experience of employing and incorporating physicians and nurses in its new product development activities. Data were collected through a questionnaire and interviews with key individuals. The study reveals that the incorporation of users has an overall positive effect on innovation activities, but that this way of working also raises several managerial issues. The results show that incorporated users play several different roles in the unit as user representatives, networkers, idea promoters and change agents. Based on our findings we propose managerial implications related to the incorporation of users.

1 - 13 of 13
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