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  • 1.
    Lee, Sunjae
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kilicarslan, Murat
    Piening, Brian D.
    Björnson, Elias
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Groen, Albert K.
    Ferrannini, Ele
    Laakso, Markku
    Snyder, Michael
    Bluher, Matthias
    Uhlèn, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. Chalmers, Sweden.
    Smith, Ulf
    Serlie, Mireille J.
    Boren, Jan
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    Integrated Network Analysis Reveals an Association between Plasma Mannose Levels and Insulin Resistance2016In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 172-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the biological processes that are altered in obese subjects, we generated cell-specific integrated networks (INs) by merging genome-scale metabolic, transcriptional regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks. We performed genome-wide transcriptomics analysis to determine the global gene expression changes in the liver and three adipose tissues from obese subjects undergoing bariatric surgery and integrated these data into the cell-specific INs. We found dysregulations in mannose metabolism in obese subjects and validated our predictions by detecting mannose levels in the plasma of the lean and obese subjects. We observed significant correlations between plasma mannose levels, BMI, and insulin resistance (IR). We also measured plasma mannose levels of the subjects in two additional different cohorts and observed that an increased plasma mannose level was associated with IR and insulin secretion. We finally identified mannose as one of the best plasma metabolites in explaining the variance in obesity-independent IR.

  • 2.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boren, Jan
    Smith, Ulf
    Confounding Effects of Metformin on the Human Gut Microbiome in Type 2 Diabetes2016In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 10-12Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with dysbiosis of the gut microbiota, though diabetes treatment regimens, including metformin, may confound the results. Forslund et al. (2015) identify distinct disease and drug signatures and highlight the importance of adjusting for treatment when investigating how T2D influences the human gut microbiome.

  • 3.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Biol & Biol Engn, S-41260 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Stancakova, Alena
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Internal Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, SF-70210 Kuopio, Finland..
    Lotta, Luca A.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC, Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Internal Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, SF-70210 Kuopio, Finland..
    Boren, Jan
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Blueher, Matthias
    Univ Leipzig, Dept Med, D-04103 Leipzig, Germany..
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC, Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Ferrannini, Ele
    CNR, Inst Clin Physiol, I-56126 Pisa, Italy..
    Groop, Per Henrik
    Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Biomedicum, Folkhalsan Inst Genet, Helsinki 00290, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Abdominal Ctr Nephrol, Helsinki 00029, Finland.;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki 00029, Finland.;Baker IDI Heart & Diabet Inst, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Laakso, Markku
    Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Internal Med, Kuopio 70210, Finland.;Kuopio Univ Hosp, SF-70210 Kuopio, Finland..
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Univ Cambridge, MRC, Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England..
    Smith, Ulf
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Mol & Clin Med, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Plasma Mannose Levels Are Associated with Incident Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease2017In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 281-283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wu, Hao
    Björnson, Elias
    Zhang, Cheng
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hakkarainen, Antti
    Rasanen, Sari M.
    Lee, Sunjae
    Mancina, Rosellina M.
    Bergentall, Mattias
    Pietilainen, Kirsi H.
    Söderlund, Sanni
    Matikainen, Niina
    Stahlman, Marcus
    Bergh, Per-Olof
    Adiels, Martin
    Piening, Brian D.
    Graner, Marit
    Lundbom, Nina
    Williams, Kevin J.
    Romeo, Stefano
    Nielsen, Jens
    Snyder, Michael
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergström, Göran
    Perkins, Rosie
    Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich
    Backhed, Fredrik
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Boren, Jan
    An Integrated Understanding of the Rapid Metabolic Benefits of a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Humans2018In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 559-571.e5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A carbohydrate-restricted diet is a widely recommended intervention for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but a systematic perspective on the multiple benefits of this diet is lacking. Here, we performed a short-term intervention with an isocaloric low-carbohydrate diet with increased protein content in obese subjects with NAFLD and characterized the resulting alterations in metabolism and the gut microbiota using a multi-omics approach. We observed rapid and dramatic reductions of liver fat and other cardiometabolic risk factors paralleled by (1) marked decreases in hepatic de novo lipogenesis; (2) large increases in serum beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, reflecting increased mitochondrial beta-oxidation; and (3) rapid increases in folate-producing Streptococcus and serum folate concentrations. Liver transcriptomic analysis on biopsy samples from a second cohort revealed downregulation of the fatty acid synthesis pathway and upregulation of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and fatty acid oxidation pathways. Our results highlight the potential of exploring diet-microbiota interactions for treating NAFLD.

  • 5.
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Systems Biology of Metabolism: A Driver for Developing Personalized and Precision Medicine2017In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 572-579Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems biology uses mathematical models to analyze large datasets and simulate system behavior. It enables integrative analysis of different types of data and can thereby provide new insight into complex biological systems. Here will be discussed the challenges of using systems medicine for advancing the development of personalized and precision medicine to treat metabolic diseases like insulin resistance, obesity, NAFLD, NASH, and cancer. It will be illustrated how the concept of genome-scale metabolic models can be used for integrative analysis of big data with the objective of identifying novel biomarkers that are foundational for personalized and precision medicine.

  • 6.
    Ryden, Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Uzunel, Mehmet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hard, Joanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol C5, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Borgström, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Mold, Jeff E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol C5, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Arner, Erik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mejhert, Niklas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Andersson, Daniel P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widlund, Yvonne
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med H5, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Jones, Christina V.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol C5, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Spalding, Kirsty L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol C5, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Frisen, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Cell & Mol Biol C5, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bernard, Samuel
    Univ Lyon, CNRS UMR 5208, Inst Camille Jordan, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France..
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Immunol, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Arner, Peter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med H7, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Transplanted Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Contribute to Human Adipogenesis2015In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 408-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because human white adipocytes display a high turnover throughout adulthood, a continuous supply of precursor cells is required to maintain adipogenesis. Bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells may contribute to mammalian adipogenesis; however, results in animal models are conflicting. Here we demonstrate in 65 subjects who underwent allogeneic BM or peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation that, over the entire lifespan, BM/PBSC-derived progenitor cells contribute similar to 10% to the subcutaneous adipocyte population. While this is independent of gender, age, and different transplantation-related parameters, body fat mass exerts a strong influence, with up to 2.5-fold increased donor cell contribution in obese individuals. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of single adipocytes suggests that BM/PBSC-derived progenitors contribute to adipose tissue via both differentiation and cell fusion. Thus, at least in the setting of transplantation, BM serves as a reservoir for adipocyte progenitors, particularly in obese subjects.

  • 7. Testoni, Giorgia
    et al.
    Duran, Jordi
    Garcia-Rocha, Mar
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Serrano, Antonio L.
    Sebastian, David
    Lopez-Soldado, Iliana
    Sullivan, Mitchell A.
    Slebe, Felipe
    Vilaseca, Marta
    Munoz-Canoves, Pura
    Guinovart, Joan J.
    Lack of Glycogenin Causes Glycogen Accumulation and Muscle Function Impairment2017In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, E-ISSN 1932-7420, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glycogenin is considered essential for glycogen synthesis, as it acts as a primer for the initiation of the polysaccharide chain. Against expectations, glycogenin-deficient mice (Gyg KO) accumulate high amounts of glycogen in striated muscle. Furthermore, this glycogen contains no covalently bound protein, thereby demonstrating that a protein primer is not strictly necessary for the synthesis of the polysaccharide in vivo. Strikingly, in spite of the higher glycogen content, Gyg KO mice showed lower resting energy expenditure and less resistance than control animals when subjected to endurance exercise. These observations can be attributed to a switch of oxidative myofibers toward glycolytic metabolism. Mice overexpressing glycogen synthase in the muscle showed similar alterations, thus indicating that this switch is caused by the excess of glycogen. These results may explain the muscular defects of GSD XV patients, who lack glycogenin-1 and show high glycogen accumulation in muscle.

1 - 7 of 7
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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