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  • 1.
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymeric Materials.
    Gällstedt, Mikael
    Johansson, E.va
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Injection-molded nanocomposites and materials based on wheat gluten2011In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is, to our knowledge, the first study of the injection molding of materials where wheat gluten (WG) is the main component. In addition to a plasticizer (glycerol), 5 wt.% natural montmorillonite clay was added. X-ray indicated intercalated clay and transmission electron microscopy indicated locally good clay platelet dispersion. Prior to feeding into the injection molder, the material was first compression molded into plates and pelletized. The filling of the circular mold via the central gate was characterized by a divergent flow yielding, in general, a stronger and stiffer material in the circumferential direction. It was observed that 20-30 wt.% glycerol yielded the best combination of processability and mechanical properties. The clay yielded improved processability, plate homogeneity and tensile stiffness. IR spectroscopy and protein solubility indicated that the injection molding process yielded a highly aggregated structure. The overall conclusion was that injection molding is a very promising method for producing WG objects.

  • 2.
    de Jesus, Liana Inara
    et al.
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Smiderle, Fhernanda R.
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Ruthes, Andrea C.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Dal'Lin, Fernando Tonholi
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Pharmacol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Maria-Ferreira, Daniele
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.;Univ Fed Parana, Dept Pharmacol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Werner, Maria Fernanda
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Pharmacol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Van Griensven, Leo J. L. D.
    Wageningen Univ & Res, Plant Res Int, Bomsesteeg 1, NL-6708 PD Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Iacomini, Marcello
    Univ Fed Parana, Dept Biochem & Mol Biol, CP 19046, Curitiba, PR, Brazil..
    Chemical characterization and wound healing property of a beta-D-glucan from edible mushroom Piptoporus betulinus2018In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 117, p. 1361-1366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A water-soluble beta-D-glucan was obtained from fruiting bodies of Piptoporus betulinus, by hot aqueous extraction followed by freeze-thawing procedure and dialysis. Its molar mass distribution and conformational behavior in solution was assessed by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with multiangle laser light scattering, showing a polysaccharide with an average molecular weight of 2.5 x 10(5) Da with a random coil conformation for molecular weights below 1 x 10(6) Da. Typical signals of beta-(1 -> 3)-linkages were observed in NMR spectrum (delta 102.7/4.76; 102.8/4.74; 102.9/4.52; and delta 85.1/3.78; 85.0/3.77) and also signals of O-6 substitution at delta 69.2/4.22 and 69.2/3.87. The analysis of partially O-methylated alditol acetates corroborates the NMR results, indicating the presence of a beta-D-glucan with a main chain (1 -> 3)-linked, substituted at O-6 by single-units of glucose. The beta-D-glucan showed no toxicity on human colon carcinoma cell line (Caco-2) up to 1000 mu g mL(-1) and promoted cell migration on in vitro scratch assay, demonstrating a potential wound healing capacity.

  • 3.
    Feng, Nianjie
    et al.
    Hubei Univ Technol, Wuhan 430068, Hubei, Peoples R China.;Nanjing Forestry Univ, Nanjing 210037, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Guo, Lifang
    Nanjing Forestry Univ, Nanjing 210037, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Ren, Hao
    Nanjing Forestry Univ, Nanjing 210037, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Xie, Yimin
    Hubei Univ Technol, Wuhan 430068, Hubei, Peoples R China..
    Jiang, Zhihua
    Auburn Univ, Alabama Ctr Paper & Bioresource Engn, Auburn, AL 36849 USA..
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Zhai, Huamin
    Nanjing Forestry Univ, Nanjing 210037, Jiangsu, Peoples R China..
    Changes in chemical structures of wheat straw auto-hydrolysis lignin by 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid as a laccase mediator2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 122, p. 210-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    3-Hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA), as a potential natural laccase mediator, was shown to mediate the oxidation of non-phenolic lignin subunits. The problem of cost and toxicity of artificial mediators could be solved to some extent by a further study about the detailed changes of lignin chemistry structures in laccase 3-HAA system (LHS). In this work, wheat straw auto-hydrolysis lignin (AL) was prepared. Oxidations of AL by LHS and laccase 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) system were then investigated, respectively. Various structural changes of AL during the oxidation were characterized by different methods including phenolic hydroxyl group determination, nitrobenzene oxidation, ozonation, gel permeation chromatography, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy. The changes in AL chemical structures were found in LHS, including unit removal, bond cleavage and biopolymerization. Compared to laccase ABTS system, a selective removal of guaiacyl-type lignin in LHS was observed, based on the results of nitrobenzene oxidation and 2D NMR analysis. The selective removal of guaiacyl-type lignin was due to improved aromatic ring cleavage and weaken lignin biopolymerization. The selectivity of guaiacyl-type lignin removal in LHS plays an important role, especially for improving bioconversion efficiency of laccase for guaiacyl-rich lignocellulosic biomass.

  • 4.
    Goliszek, M.
    et al.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Polymer Chem, M Curie Sklodowska Sq 5, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Podkoscielna, B.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Polymer Chem, M Curie Sklodowska Sq 5, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Fila, K.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Polymer Chem, M Curie Sklodowska Sq 5, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Chabros, A.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Polymer Chem, M Curie Sklodowska Sq 5, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Paczkowski, P.
    Marie Curie Sklodowska Univ, Dept Polymer Chem, M Curie Sklodowska Sq 5, PL-20031 Lublin, Poland..
    Investigation of accelerated aging of lignin-containing polymer materials2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 123, p. 910-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the results of an accelerated aging test of biocomposites containing kraft lignin, where the resistance of the materials against humidity and light exposure was investigated. Low molecular weight lignin, modified with methacrylic anhydride (LWL-Met), was copolymerized with two commercial monomers: styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA). The biocomposites were obtained by a bulk polymerization method using alpha,alpha'-azoiso-bis-butyronitrile (AIBN) as a free radical polymerization initiator. The Shore D hardness of the obtained materials was determined before and after aging test. The changes in the chemical structures of polymers, as the result of aging were analyzed by using the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR/FT-IR) spectroscopy method. The thermal behavior and stability of the obtained materials were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The surface topography was determined using the optical topography method to evaluate the changes on the surface of synthesized materials resulted from accelerated aging. Application of modified lignin as a biocomponent in the polymerization process and its influence on the properties of the obtained materials before and after the accelerated aging test are discussed.

  • 5. Jamshidian, H.
    et al.
    Shojaosadati, S. A.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Mousavi, S. M.
    Soudi, M. R.
    Characterization and optimization of schizophyllan production from date syrup2016In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 92, p. 484-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study demonstrates the efficient utilization of low-cost agricultural substrates, particularly date syrup, by Schizophyllum commune ATCC 38548 for schizophyllan production. Initially, one factor-at-a-time method was used to find the best carbon and nitrogen sources for schizophyllan production. Subsequently, response surface methodology was employed to optimize the level of culture medium components to maximize substrate conversion yield and schizophyllan production in submerged culture. Maximum product yield (0.12 g schizophyllan/g date syrup) and schizophyllan production (8.5 g/l) were obtained at concentrations of date syrup and corn steep liquor, inoculum size and agitation rate at 7.02 %w/v, 0.10 %w/v, 7.68 %v/v and 181 rpm, respectively. Sugar composition analysis, FTIR, NMR and molar mass determination revealed the purity and molecular properties of recovered schizophyllan produced from date syrup as glycosidic linkage analysis showed three main schizophyllan characteristic peaks arising from the 3-linked, 3,6-linked and terminal glucose residues. Finally, process economic analysis suggested that use of date syrup and corn steep liquor as nutrients would result in approximately 6-fold reduction in cost of raw materials for schizophyllan production as compared to conventional carbon and nitrogen sources such as sucrose and malt extract.

  • 6. Jamshidian, Hajar
    et al.
    Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas
    Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad
    Soudi, Mohammad Reza
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Implications of recovery procedures on structural and rheological properties of schizophyllan produced from date syrup2017In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 105, p. 36-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effects of different recovery procedures on high molar mass schizophyl-Ian produced by Schizophyllum commune using low value agricultural residues. Recovered extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) were compared in terms of purity, sugar composition, degree of branching, molecular weight, and rheological properties. Performing different recovery methods, such as re-dissolving in water and re-precipitation with ethanol on produced EPS, provided schizophyllan with purity similar to the commercial grade. Besides, Freeze-thawing cycles allowed the fractionation of schizophyllan based on branching degree and solubility. The EPSs with higher purity and lower degree of branching (less conformational flexibility) showed higher viscosity. This study evidences the possibility of producing EPSs with excellent rheological properties using low value agricultural side products. Furthermore, our results demonstrate the importance of recovery methods for tailoring the purity, molecular structure and macroscopic properties of the produced polysaccharides for specific applications.

  • 7.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Unveiling the structure and ultrastructure of lignin carbohydrate complexes in softwoods2013In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 62, p. 705-713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulose-based polymers are presently being investigated for potential as raw materials for polymer industry. However, covalent bonds between carbohydrates and lignin, so called lignin carbohydrate complexes (LCCs) present one of the factors impeding clean fractionation of the polymers. Understanding the chemical structure of LCCs in relation to the cell wall ultra-structure therefore provides relevant insight for technical fractionation. In the present work, new mild analytical protocols for LCCs were developed and fractions thereof subjected to detailed structural/ultra-structural characterization. When combined with size exclusion chromatography, the application of mono-component ploysaccharidases proved to be crucial for the identification of LCC moieties and provided indirect evidence for existence of lignin-carbohydrate bonds. The carbohydrate composition of the LCC moieties was essential to determination of the ultra-structural origin of the LCC types. Analytical 31P NMR of the LCCs and of their thioacidolysis products was useful in unveiling lignin structure in LCCs. A complete structure/ultra-structure relationship of LCCs in softwood was determined.

  • 8.
    Li, Jing
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Wang, Damao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Xing, Xiaohui
    Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel
    Genomics Research Centre, Academia Sinica, Sec. 2, 128 Academia Road, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan.
    Liang, Pi-Hui
    School of Pharmacy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan.
    Bulone, Vincent
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. Adelaide Glycomics, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Waite Campus, Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia.
    Park, Jeong Hill
    College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 08826, Republic of Korea.
    Hsieh, Yves S. Y.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Structural analysis and biological activity of cell wall polysaccharides extracted from Panax ginseng marc2019In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 135, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ginseng marc is a major by-product of the ginseng industry currently used as animal feed or fertilizer. This fibrous, insoluble waste stream is rich in cell wall polysaccharides and therefore a potential source of ingredients for functional food with health-promoting properties. However, the extraction of these polysaccharides has proved problematic and their exact composition remains unknown. Here we have analysed the composition, structure and biological activity of polysaccharides from ginseng root, stem and leaf marc fractionated using a chelator and alkali solutions. The pectic fraction has been extracted from root marc in high abundance and can activate the production of interleukine-1α and the hematopoietic growth factor by RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells, which are important immune regulators of T-cells during inflammatory responses and infection processes. Our study reveals the potential to increase the value of ginseng marc by generating carbohydrate-based products with a higher value than animal feed.

  • 9.
    Liu, Jun
    et al.
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland.;Jiangsu Univ, Dept Environm & Safety, Biofuels Inst, Zhenjiang 212013, Peoples R China..
    Leppanen, Ann-Sofie
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Kisonen, Victor
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Willfor, Stefan
    Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Xu, Chunlin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Abo Akad Univ, Johan Gadolin Proc Chem Ctr, Lab Wood & Paper Chem, Porthansgatan 3-5, FI-20500 Turku, Finland..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Insights on the distribution of substitutions in spruce galactoglucomannan and its derivatives using integrated chemo-enzymatic deconstruction, chromatography and mass spectrometry2018In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 112, p. 616-625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accurate determination of the distribution of substitutions in the primary molecular structure of heteropolysaccharides and their derivatives is a prerequisite for their increasing application in the pharmaceutical and biomedical fields, which is unfortunately hindered due to the lack of effective analytical techniques. Acetylated galactoglucomannan (GGM) is an abundant plant polysaccharide as the main hemicellulose in softwoods, and therefore constitutes an important renewable resource from lignocellulosic biomass for the development of bioactive and functional materials. Here we present a methodology for profiling the intramolecular structure of spruce GGM and its chemical derivatives (cationic, anionic, and benzoylated) by combining chemo-enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. Fast identification and qualitative mass profiling of GGM and its derivatives was conducted using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Tandem mass fragmentation analysis and its hyphenation with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-ESI-MS/MS) provide further insights on the substitution placement of the GGM oligosaccharides and its derivatives. This method will be useful in understanding the structure-function relationships of native GGM and their derivatives, and therefore facilitate their potential application. 

  • 10. Rasheed, Faiza
    et al.
    Newson, William R.
    Plivelic, Tomas S.
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gallstedt, Mikael
    Johansson, Eva
    Macromolecular changes and nano-structural arrangements in gliadin and glutenin films upon chemical modification Relation to functionality2015In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 79, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein macromolecules adopted for biological and bio-based material functions are known to develop a structured protein network upon chemical modification. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of chemical additives such as, NaOH, NH4OH and salicylic acid (SA), on the secondary and nano-structural transitions of wheat proteins. Further, the effect of chemically induced modifications in protein macromolecular structure was anticipated in relation to functional properties. The gliadin-NH4OH-SA film showed a supramolecular protein organization into hexagonal structures with 65 angstrom lattice parameter, and other not previously observed structural entities having a characteristic distance of 50 angstrom. Proteins in gliadin-NH4OH-SA films were highly polymerized, with increased amount of disulfide crosslinks and beta-sheets, causing improved strength and stiffness. Glutenin and WG proteins with NH4OH-SA showed extensive aggregation and an increase in beta-sheet content together with irreversible crosslinks. Irreversible crosslinks hindered a high order structure formation in glutenins, and this resulted in films with only moderately improved stiffness. Thus, formation of nano-hierarchical structures based on beta-sheets and disulfide crosslinks are the major reasons of high strength and stiffness in wheat protein based films.

  • 11.
    Redeby, Theres
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Carr, H.
    Björk, M.
    Emmer, Åsa
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    A screening procedure for the solubilization of chloroplast membrane proteins from the marine green macroalga Ulva lactuca using RP-HPLC-MALDI-MS2006In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 39, no 1-3, p. 29-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A protocol for purification and analysis of chloroplast membrane proteins in the green macroalga Ulva lactuca has been developed, including reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Five different solvents were evaluated for extraction of membrane proteins by three methods. The highest protein yield was achieved when proteins were extracted directly from the chloroplasts using the solvent hexafluoroisopropanol. A range of proteins of increasing hydrophobicity was separated by HPLC. Analysis of both HPLC fractions and non-separated samples by MALDI-TOF-MS revealed proteins with molecular weights spanning between 1 and 376 kDa.

  • 12. Trovatti, E.
    et al.
    Cunha, A. Gisela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carvalho, A. J. F.
    Gandini, A.
    Furan-modified natural rubber: A substrate for its reversible crosslinking and for clicking it onto nanocellulose2017In: International Journal of Biological Macromolecules, ISSN 0141-8130, E-ISSN 1879-0003, Vol. 95, p. 762-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conventional vulcanization process applied to elastomers is irreversible and hinders therefore their useful recycling. We demonstrate here that natural rubber can be reversibly crosslinked via the Diels-Alder coupling of furan and maleimide moieties. The furan-modified natural rubber used in this strategy was also exploited to bind it to maleimide-modified nanocellulose, thus generating a covalently crosslinked composite of these two renewable polymers.

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