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  • 1.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Anfelt, Josefin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ljungqvist, Emil
    KTH.
    Jahn, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Systems Biology.
    Yao, Lun
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Targeted Repression of Essential Genes To Arrest Growth and Increase Carbon Partitioning and Biofuel Titers in Cyanobacteria2018In: ACS Synthetic Biology, E-ISSN 2161-5063, Vol. 7, no 7, article id diva2:1239079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoautotrophic production of fuels and chemicals by cyanobacteria typically gives lower volumetric productivities and titers than heterotrophic production. Cyanobacteria cultures become light limited above an optimal cell density, so that this substrate is not supplied to all cells sufficiently. Here, we investigate genetic strategies for a two-phase cultivation, where biofuel-producing Synechocystis cultures are limited to an optimal cell density through inducible CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) repression of cell growth. Fixed CO2 is diverted to ethanol or n-butanol. Among the most successful strategies was partial repression of citrate synthase gltA. Strong repression (>90%) of gitA at low culture densities increased carbon partitioning to n-butanol 5-fold relative to a nonrepression strain, but sacrificed volumetric productivity due to severe growth restriction. CO2 fixation continued for at least 3 days after growth was arrested. By targeting sgRNAs to different regions of the gitA gene, we could modulate GItA expression and carbon partitioning between growth and product to increase both specific and volumetric productivity. These growth arrest strategies can be useful for improving performance of other photoautotrophic processes.

  • 2. Siedler, S.
    et al.
    Kumar Khatri, Narendar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zsohár, A.
    Kjærbølling, I.
    Vogt, M.
    Hammar, Petter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nielsen, C. F.
    Marienhagen, J.
    Sommer, M. O. A.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Nano Biotechnology.
    Development of a Bacterial Biosensor for Rapid Screening of Yeast p-Coumaric Acid Production2017In: ACS Synthetic Biology, E-ISSN 2161-5063, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 1860-1869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transcription factor-based biosensors are used to identify producer strains, a critical bottleneck in cell factory engineering. Here, we address two challenges with this methodology: transplantation of heterologous transcriptional regulators into new hosts to generate functional biosensors and biosensing of the extracellular product concentration that accurately reflects the effective cell factory production capacity. We describe the effects of different translation initiation rates on the dynamic range of a p-coumaric acid biosensor based on the Bacillus subtilis transcriptional repressor PadR by varying its ribosomal binding site. Furthermore, we demonstrate the functionality of this p-coumaric acid biosensor in Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, we encapsulate yeast p-coumaric acid-producing cells with E. coli-biosensing cells in picoliter droplets and, in a microfluidic device, rapidly sort droplets containing yeast cells producing high amounts of extracellular p-coumaric acid using the fluorescent E. coli biosensor signal. As additional biosensors become available, such approaches will find broad applications for screening of an extracellular product.

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