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  • 1.
    Langbroek, Joram H.M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics. Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5, bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    How would you change your travel patterns if you used an electric vehicle? A stated adaptation approach2018In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688, Vol. 13, p. 144-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The real environmental benefits of a transition towards EVs highly depend on the future EV-users’ activity-travel patterns adapted to their new vehicle’s capacity. Despite its importance, the impact of this adaptation is largely unknown. In this study, a stated adaptation experiment has been conducted to investigate changes of travel patterns as a result of range limitations or the opposite, abundant range. The basis for this experiment is a one-day travel diary among active drivers in Greater Stockholm. The main findings of this study are the following: (1) Drivers facing range limitations are more likely to make use of alternative means of transport (mainly public transport) if the travel time difference between car and public transport is low and if not many transfers are needed for the public transport trip. (2) In case of (perceived) range limitations, shopping trips and trips visiting friends or relatives are more likely to be cancelled than working trips. (3) The main trip purpose of additional trips in case of sufficient EV range is shopping. (4) A non-negligible number of public transport trips are likely to be replaced by EV. Shortly, the effects of the transition towards electric vehicle use on personal mobility seem to depend on the availability of accessible substitutes. Besides that, a rebound effect has been observed in this study.

  • 2.
    Tanko, Michael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Cheemakurthy, Harsha
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Hall Kihl, Susanna
    KTH.
    Garme, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Naval Systems. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Water transit passenger perceptions and planning factors: A Swedish perspective2019In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688, Vol. 16, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased urban congestion in cities has led to suggestions for the greater use of inland waterways for passenger transit. However, there has been relatively little exploration of how water transit differs in terms of passenger service attributes compared to other transport modes and how passenger attitudes toward water transit service factors may affect overall satisfaction. The present study attempts to address this gap in knowledge in a study of water transport users in Stockholm, Sweden in order understand how water transit fares compared to other modes. Building on the literature of attitudinal studies for other transit modes, a survey was conducted in the Stockholm metropolitan area of water transit users on the primary inner-city water transit route. Details on trip characteristics, demographic and passenger's attitudes toward service attributes and their satisfaction was collected. After factor analysis, a structural equation model is proposed to explore the impact of service characteristics on global customer satisfaction. The results indicate that the latent factor comfort, including indicators such as cleanliness of vessel and environmental and scenic factors were more significant in explaining overall passenger satisfaction, above service issues such as network size and frequency. The finding supports the growing body of research highlighting the importance of such experiential factors in explaining customer satisfaction within public transport. Greater incorporation of such non-traditional service attributes can therefore give a better picture of transit user mode choice behavior and aid in future service planning ongoing policy development of the water transit network in Stockholm. © 2019 Hong Kong Society for Transportation Studies

  • 3.
    Termida, Nursitihazlin Ahmad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. Univ Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Fac Civil & Environm Engn, Smart Driving Res Ctr, Batu Pahat 86400, Johor, Malaysia.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Franklin, Joel P.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics.
    Chengxi, Liu
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Understanding seasonal variation in individual's activity participation and trip generation by using four consecutive two-week travel diary2018In: Travel Behaviour & Society, ISSN 2214-367X, E-ISSN 2214-3688, Vol. 12, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the interactions between travel demand, time allocation and mode choice in different seasons by jointly modeling the work and/or study, routine and leisure activity-travel engagements of 67 individuals in Stockholm, Sweden. A longitudinal panel two-week travel diary data collected in four consecutive waves over a span of seven months period that covers all four different seasons; autumn, winter, spring and summer, were analysed by using simultaneous Tobit models. The model was applied to explore the interactions among each activity-travel indicator, and individuals' unique characteristics and endogeneity in activity-travel engagements between different seasons were also considered in the model system. The results of models reveal clear trade-offs between mandatory activities (work and/or study) and non-mandatory activities (routine and leisure), regardless of any seasons, although the magnitudes vary between seasons. There is also a positive mutual endogeneity relationship between number of trips and activity duration within the same activity type. The trade-offs between work and/or study trips towards routine and leisure trips are larger in winter and spring respectively, than in other seasons. It is also found that mode effects on travel time for conducting mandatory activity are much larger in spring than in other seasons. However, the effects of public transport and slow modes on travel time for leisure activities are much larger in summer than in other seasons.

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