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  • 1.
    Brain, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places. New Coll Florida, Div Social Sci, Sarasota, FL 34243 USA.
    Reconstituting the Urban Commons: Public Space, Social Capital and the Project of Urbanism2019In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 169-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article outlines a framework for connecting design-oriented research on accommodating and encouraging social interaction in public space with investigation of broader questions regarding civic engagement, social justice and democratic governance. How can we define the "kind of problem a city is" (Jacobs, 1961), simultaneously attending to the social processes at stake in urban places, the spatial ordering of urban form and the construction of the forms of agency that enable us to make better places on purpose? How can empirical research be connected more systematically to theories of democratic governance, with clear implications for urban design, urban and regional planning as professional practice? This framework connects three distinct theoretical moves: (1) understanding the sociological implications of public space as an urban commons, (2) connecting the making of public space to research on social capital and collective efficacy, and (3) understanding recent tendencies in the discipline of urban design in terms of the social construction of a "program of action" (Latour, 1992) at the heart of the professional practices relevant to the built environment.

  • 2.
    Cai, Zipan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Page, Jessica
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys Geog, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    How Does ICT Expansion Drive "Smart" Urban Growth?: A Case Study of Nanjing, China2020In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 129-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of accelerated urbanization, socioeconomic development, and population growth, as well as the rapid advancement of information and communication technology (ICT), urban land is rapidly expanding worldwide. Unplanned urban growth has led to the low utilization efficiency of land resources. Also, ecological and agricultural lands are continuously sacrificed for urban construction, which in the long-term may severely impact the health of citizens in cities. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms and driving forces of a city's urban land use changes, including the influence of ICT development, is therefore crucial to the formation of optimal and feasible urban planning in the new era. Taking Nanjing as a study case, this article attempts to explore the measurable "smart" driving indicators of urban land use change and analyze the tapestry of the relationship between these and urban land use change. Different from the traditional linear regression analysis method of driving force of urban land use change, this study focuses on the interaction relationship and the underlying causal relationship among various "smart" driving factors, so it adopts a fuzzy statistical method, namely the grey relational analysis (GRA). Through the integration of literature research and known effective data, five categories of "smart" indicators have been taken as the primary driving factors: industry and economy, transportation, humanities and science, ICT systems, and environmental management. The results show that these indicators have different impacts on driving urban built-up land growth. Accordingly, optimization possibilities and recommendations for development strategies are proposed to realize a "smarter" development direction in Nanjing. This article confirms the effectiveness of GRA for studies on the driving mechanisms of urban land use change and provides a theoretical basis for the development goals of a smart city.

  • 3.
    Cai, Zipan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Page, Jessica
    Stockholm University.
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Resources, Energy and Infrastructure.
    Urban Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment of Support Climate‐ResilientCity Development2021In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, no 3, p. 227-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change poses a threat to cities. Geospatial information and communication technology (Geo-ICT) assisted planning is increasingly being utilised to foster urban sustainability and adaptability to climate change. To fill the theoretical and practical gaps of urban adaptive planning and Geo-ICT implementation, this article presents an urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment approach using integrated socio-ecological modelling. The application of the Geo-ICT method is demonstrated in a specific case study of climate-resilient city development in Nanjing (China), aiming at helping city decision-makers understand the general geographic data processing and policy revision processes in response to hypothetical future disruptions and pressures on urban social, economic, and environmental systems. Ideally, the conceptual framework of the climate-resilient city transition proposed in this study effectively integrates the geographic data analysis, policy modification, and participatory planning. In the process of model building, we put forward the index system of urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment and use the assessment result as input data for the socio-ecological model. As a result, the model reveals the interaction processes of local land use, economy, and environment, further generating an evolving state of future land use in the studied city. The findings of this study demonstrate that socio-ecological modelling can provide guidance in adjusting the human-land interaction and climate-resilient city development from the perspective of macro policy. The decision support using urban ecosystem vulnerability assessment and quantitative system modelling can be useful for urban development under a variety of environmental change scenarios.

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  • 4. D'Acci, Luca
    et al.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Bardhan, Ronita
    Inaugural Editorial of Urban Planning2016In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This editorial is the introductory piece of Urban Planning, a new international peer-reviewed open access journal of urban studies aimed at advancing understanding of and ideas about humankind's habitats in order to promote progress and quality of life.

  • 5.
    Eneqvist, Erica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Built Environm, S-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karvonen, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Experimental Governance and Urban Planning Futures: Five Strategic Functions for Municipalities in Local Innovation2021In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 183-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental governance is increasingly being implemented in cities around the world through laboratories, testbeds, platforms, and innovation districts to address a wide range of complex sustainability challenges. Experiments often involve public-private partnerships and triple helix collaborations with the municipality as a key stakeholder. This stretches the responsibilities of local authorities beyond conventional practices of policymaking and regulation to engage in more applied, collaborative, and recursive forms of planning. In this article, we examine how local authorities are involved in experimental governance and how this is influencing their approach to urban development. We are specifically interested in the multiple strategic functions that municipalities play in experimental governance and the broader implications to existing urban planning practices and norms. We begin the article by developing an analytic framework of the most common strategic functions of municipalities in experimental governance and then apply this framework to Stockholm, a city that has embraced experimental governance as a means to realise its sustainability ambitions. Our findings reveal how the strategic functions of visioning, facilitating, supporting, amplifying, and guarding are producing new opportunities and challenges to urban planning practices in twenty-first century cities.

  • 6.
    Hagbert, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wangel, Josefin
    SLU.
    Broms, Loove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication, Konstfack University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Sweden.
    Exploring the Potential for Just Urban Transformations in Light of Eco-Modernist Imaginaries of Sustainability2020In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article approaches urban ethics through critically examining the production and reproduction of an eco-modern socio-technical imaginary of sustainable urban development in Sweden, and the conditions and obstacles this poses for a just transformation. We see that notions of ecological modernization re-present problems of urban sustainability in ways that do not challenge the predominant regime, but rather uphold unjust power relations. More particularly, through an approach inspired by critical discourse analysis, we uncover what these problem representations entail, deconstructing what we find as three cornerstones of an eco-modern imaginary that obstruct the emergence of a more ethically-engaged understanding of urban sustainability. The first concerns which scales and system boundaries are constructed as relevant, and how this results in some modes and places of production and consumption being constructed as more efficient—and sustainable—than others. The second cornerstone has to do with what resources and ways of using them (including mediating technologies) are foregrounded and constructed as more important in relation to sustainability than others. The third cornerstone concerns the construction of subjectivities, through which some types of people and practices are put forth as more efficient—and sustainable—than others. Utilizing a critical speculative design approach, we explore a selection of alternative problem representations, and finally discuss these in relation to the possibility of affording a more ethical urban design and planning practice.

  • 7.
    Jing, Jing
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Seeing Streetscapes as Social Infrastructure: A Paradigmatic Case Study of Hornsbergs Strand, Stockholm2022In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 510-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban streets are an integral part of the public realm. Streets are commonly planned following normative design prin-ciples focused on the connectivity of road networks and urban morphology. Beyond their function as mobility infras-tructure, streetscapes' aesthetic, social, and cultural qualities also have an important impact on the experience of the overall urban environment and human well-being. This study explores how urban design and planning can facilitate the design, management, and use of streetscapes that consider their role as social infrastructure. A paradigmatic case study of Hornsbergs Strand in the City of Stockholm is performed, incorporating spatial and temporal aspects. The case study area is chosen because it is both an attractive and "overcrowded" public space frequently discussed in the Swedish media. Data sources for the study include reviews of public documents such as Stockholm's city planning strategies, local media reports, a report from a resident workgroup, as well as walk-through observations and semi-structured expert interviews. The results highlight the potential of urban design strategies to develop streetscapes as social infrastructure through both permanent design measures and temporary design interventions. The tendency of the change in people's perception and attitude toward the place over time illustrates that design interventions are a continual process. The implications for pub-lic policy, urban development and investment in social infrastructure employing place strategies and design interventions are discussed.

  • 8.
    Karvonen, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Cook, Matthew
    Haarstad, Håvard
    Urban planning and the smart city: projects, practices and politics2020In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 65-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s smart city agendas are the latest iteration of urban sociotechnical innovation. Their aim is to use information and communication technologies (ICT) to improve the economic and environmental performance of cities while hopefully providing a better quality of life for residents. Urban planners have a long-standing tradition of aligning technological in- novation with the built environment and residents but have been only peripherally engaged in smart cities debates to date. However, this situation is beginning to change as iconic, one-of-a-kind smart projects are giving way to the ‘actually existing’ smart city and ICT interventions are emerging as ubiquitous features of twenty-first century cities. The aim of this thematic issue is to explore the various ways that smart cities are influencing and being influenced by urban planning. The articles provide empirical evidence of how urban planners are engaging with processes of smart urbanisation through projects, practices, and politics. They reveal the profound and lasting influence of digitalisation on urban planning and the multiple opportunities for urban planners to serve as champions and drivers of the smart city.

  • 9.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    On Architectural Space and Modes of Subjectivity: Producing the Material Conditions for Creative-Productive Activity2018In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses extended implications of Lefebvre’s The Production of Space in the context of contemporary global neoliberalism, by focus on its presence in architectural space as lived space and spatial practice. The main discussion concerns Lefebvre’s concepts of abstract space, in relation to Felix Guattari’s three ecologies, and the Aristotelean triad of aisthesis, poiesis and techné. The focus here concerns material architectural space and its relation to modes of subjectivity, especially creative-productive versus consuming subjectivities. The argument begins by elaborating on an understanding of abstract space as present in material architectural space as pervasive processes of disassociation of materiality and labor, and proceeds to through these concepts discuss modes of subjectivity—the dependence of abstract space on subjects as consumers—and the way this relates to challenges of sustainability. It further points to the importance of architectural space considered as built material environment for creative-productive modes of subjectivity which challenge abstract space and in extension consumer society, by offering potential dispositions that set subjects in a different relation to the world.

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    Koch D -- On Architectural Space and Modes of Subjectivity (Urban Planning, 2018)
  • 10.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    Sustasis Foundation, USA.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Introduction: Toward a “Post‐Alexandrian” Agenda2023In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 148-152Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Christopher Alexander, who died in March 2022, was undeniably one of the most influential, if sometimes controversial, urban thinkers of the last half‐century. From Notes on the Synthesis of Form, his first book and Harvard PhD thesis, to the landmark “A City is Not a Tree,” to the classic best‐sellers A Pattern Language and The Timeless Way of Building, to his more difficult and controversial magnum opus, The Nature of Order, Alexander has left a body of work whose breadth and depth is only now coming into view. Yet Alexander’s legacy is also the subject of intense debate and critique within the planning and design fields. This introduction provides an overview of the thematic issue of Urban Planning titled “Assessing the Complex Contributions of Christopher Alexander.” Its purpose is to provide greater clarity on where Alexander’s contribu-tion is substantial, and where there are documented gaps and remaining challenges. Most importantly, the thematic issue aims to identify fruitful avenues for further research and development, taking forward some of the more promising but undeveloped insights of this seminal 20th‐century thinker.

  • 11.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    New Urbanism in the New Urban Agenda: Threads of an Unfinished Reformation2020In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 441-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present evidence that New Urbanism, defined as a set of normative urban characteristics codified in the 1996 Charter of the New Urbanism, reached a seminal moment-in mission if not in name-with the 2016 New Urban Agenda, a landmark document adopted by acclamation by all 193 member states of the United Nations. We compare the two documents and find key parallels between them (including mix of uses, walkable multi-modal streets, buildings defining public space, mix of building ages and heritage patterns, co-production of the city by the citizens, and understanding of the city as an evolutionary self-organizing structure). Both documents also reveal striking contrasts with the highly influential 20th century Athens Charter, from 1933, developed by the Congres Internationaux d'Architecture Moderne. Yet, both newer documents also still face formidable barriers to implementation, and, as we argue, each faces similar challenges in formulating effective alternatives to business as usual. We trace this history up to the present day, and the necessary requirements for what we conclude is an `unfinished reformation' ahead.

  • 12.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Elmlund, Peter
    Ax Son Johnson Fdn, Urban City Res, S-10375 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Public space in the new urban agenda: Research into implementation2019In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 134-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The New Urban Agenda is a landmark international framework for urbanisation for the next two decades, adopted by acclamation by all 193 countries of the United Nations. Nonetheless, implementation remains an enormous challenge, as does the related need for research evidence to inform practice. This thematic issue brings together research from a number of participants of the Future of Places conference series, contributing new research to inform the development and implementation of the New Urban Agenda, and with a focus on the fundamental topic of public space creation and improvement.

  • 13.
    Mehaffy, Michael West
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Neighborhood “choice architecture”: A new strategy for lower-emissions urban planning?2018In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in the field of behavioral economics offer intriguing insights into the ways that consumer decisions are influenced and may be influenced more deliberately to better meet community-wide and democratic goals. We demonstrate that these insights open a door to urban planners who may thereby develop strategies to alter urban-scale consumption behaviors that may significantly reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per capita. We first hypothesize that it is possible, through feasible changes in neighborhood structure, to alter the “choice architecture” of neighborhoods in order to achieve meaningful GHG reductions. We then formulate a number of elements of “choice architecture” that may be applied as tools at the neighborhood scale. We examine several neighborhoods that demonstrate variations in these elements, and from known inventories, we generate a preliminary assessment of the possible magnitude of GHG reductions that may be available. Although we acknowledge many remaining challenges, we conclude that “neighborhood choice architecture” offers a promising new strategy meriting further research and development.

  • 14. Petrescu, Doina
    et al.
    Cermeño, Helena
    Keller, Carsten
    Moujan, Carola
    Belfield, Andrew
    Koch, Florian
    Goff, Denise
    Schalk, Meike
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Bernhardt, Floris
    Sharing and Space-Commoning Knowledge Through Urban Living Labs Across Different European Cities2022In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the growing commodification of housing and public spaces in European cities is producing urban inequalities affect‐ing mostly migrant and vulnerable populations, there are also manifold small‐scale neighbourhood‐based collaborative processes that seek to co‐produce shared urban resources and contribute to more resilient urban developments. As part of the ProSHARE research project that investigates conditions in which sharing takes place and can be expanded to less‐represented populations, we focus here on sharing and space‐commoning practices within urban living labs. Considered multi‐stakeholders sites for innovation, testing, and learning with a strong urban transformative potential, urban living labs have received increasing academic attention in recent years. However, questions related to whether and how labs facilitate processes of exchange and negotiation of knowledge claims and generate spatial knowledge remain largely unexplored. We address this gap by looking at the role urban living labs play in the regeneration of neighbour‐hoods, asking how sharing and space‐commoning practices generate situated spatial knowledge(s) that can be used in planning processes, and what type of settings and methods can facilitate such processes. These questions are addressed in the context of four ProSHARE‐Labs located in Berlin, Paris (Bagneux), London, and Vienna, drawing on a cross‐case ana‐lysis of the functioning of these hubs, the research methods applied in each context, and on the translocal learning and possibilities for upscaling resulting from these parallel experiences.

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  • 15.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Curating Player Experience Through Simulations in City Games2022In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of games as a method for planning and designing cities is often associated with visualisation, from simplistic to immersive environments. They can also include complex and sophisticated models which provide an evidence base. The use of such technology as artefacts, aids, or mechanics curates the player experience in different and very often subtle ways, influencing how we engage with (simulated) urban phenomena, and, therefore, how the games can be used. In this article, we aim to explore how different aspects of technology use in city games influence the player experience and game outcomes. The article describes two games built upon the same city gaming framework, played with professionals in Rome and Haifa, respectively. Using a mixed-method, action research approach, the article examines how the high-tech, free form single-player games elicit the mental models of players (traffic controllers and planners in both cases). Questionnaires and the players' reflections on the gameplay, models used, and outcomes have been transcribed and analysed. Observations and results point to several dimensions that are critical to the outcomes of digital city games. Agency, exploration, openness, complexity, and learning are aspects that are strongly influenced by technology and models, and in turn, determine the outcomes of the game. City games that balance these aspects unlock player expertise to better understand the game dynamics and enable their imagination to better negotiate and resolve conflicts in design and planning.

  • 16.
    Wiberg, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Planning With Art: Artistic Involvement Initiated by Public Authorities in Sweden2022In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 394-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a Swedish context, public authorities have, over the past 10 years, implemented a number of initiatives to make art a central part of not only sustainable development but also urban planning as a practice, process, and knowledge area. Art and artistic methods are seen to contribute with new methods for site analyses (often in combination with citizen involvement) to enhance embodied and situated knowledge and give space to critical reflection. One of the Swedish initiatives is called Art Is Happening. Between 2016 and 2018, the Swedish government assigned the Public Art Agency Sweden money to work with public art and citizen inclusion in million program areas. The initiative was framed as using artistic methods to strengthen democracy in areas with low turnout. Fifteen places around the country were selected. In this article, the focus is on one of those projects in Karlskrona, where an artist collaborated with citizens to create a public artwork and local meeting place. During the process, the artist partly lived in the area. Rather than discussing the artistic project from a binary logic as disempowerment/empowerment, consensual/agonistic, and political/antipolitical, it is examined as a process involving a mixture of both, where power unfolded in ways that were both problematic and valuable at the same time. This approach moves away from “good or bad” to a nuanced way of discussing how artistic methods can contribute to understandings of situated knowledge production in urban planning.

  • 17.
    Wormbs, Nina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Soderberg, Maria Wolrath
    Södertörn Univ, Div Rhetor, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Knowledge, Fear, and Conscience: Reasons to Stop Flying Because of Climate Change2021In: Urban Planning, E-ISSN 2183-7635, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 314-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research on the societal consequences of climate change has focused on inaction, seeking to explain why societies and individuals do not change according to experts' recommendations. In this qualitative study, we instead consider people who have changed their behaviour for the sake of the climate: They have stopped travelling by air. We first asked them to elaborate their rationales for the behaviour change. Then, using topos theory to find thought structures, we analysed their 673 open-text answers. Several themes emerged, which together can be regarded as a process of change. Increased knowledge, primarily narrated as a process by which latent knowledge was transformed into insight, through experience or emotional distress, was important. Contrary to certain claims in the literature, fear stimulated change of behaviour for many in this group. Climate change was framed as a moral issue, requiring acts of conscience. Children were invoked as educators and moral guides. Role models and a supportive social context played an important part. Alternatives to flying were brought forward as a motive to refrain from flying. Only a few mentioned shame as momentous. Instead, stopping travelling by air invoked a feeling of agency and responsibility, and could also result in a positive sensation.

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