Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Agostinho, A.
    et al.
    Kouznetsova, A.
    Hernández-Hernández, A.
    Bernhem, Kristoffer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Blom, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Höög, C.
    Sexual dimorphism in the width of the mouse synaptonemal complex2018In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 131, no 5, article id jcs212548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual dimorphism has been used to describe morphological differences between the sexes, but can be extended to any biologically related process that varies between males and females. The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a tripartite structure that connects homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Here, aided by superresolution microscopy techniques, we show that the SC is subject to sexual dimorphism, in mouse germ cells. We have identified a significantly narrower SC in oocytes and have established that this difference does not arise from a different organization of the lateral elements nor from a different isoform of transverse filament protein SYCP1. Instead, we provide evidence for the existence of a narrower central element and a different integration site for the C-termini of SYCP1, in females. In addition to these female-specific features, we speculate that post-translation modifications affecting the SYCP1 coiled-coil region could render a more compact conformation, thus contributing to the narrower SC observed in females.

  • 2.
    Yapo, Cedric
    et al.
    Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, Biol Adaptat & Ageing, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Nair, Anu G.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Tata Inst Fundamental Res, Natl Ctr Biol Sci, Bangalore 560065, Karnataka, India.;Manipal Univ, Manipal 576104, Karnataka, India.;Univ Zurich, Inst Mol Life Sci, Winterthurerstr 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland..
    Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, S-17177 Solna, Sweden..
    Vincent, Pierre
    Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, Biol Adaptat & Ageing, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Castro, Liliana R. V.
    Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, Biol Adaptat & Ageing, F-75005 Paris, France..
    Switch-like PKA responses in the nucleus of striatal neurons2018In: Journal of Cell Science, ISSN 0021-9533, E-ISSN 1477-9137, Vol. 131, no 14, article id UNSP jcs216556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although it is known that protein kinase A (PKA) in the nucleus regulates gene expression, the specificities of nuclear PKA signaling remain poorly understood. Here, we combined computational modeling and live-cell imaging of PKA-dependent phosphorylation in mouse brain slices to investigate how transient dopamine signals are translated into nuclear PKA activity in cortical pyramidal neurons and striatal medium spiny neurons. We observed that the nuclear PKA signal in striatal neurons featured an ultrasensitive responsiveness, associated with fast all-or-none responses, which is not consistent with the commonly accepted theory of a slow and passive diffusion of catalytic PKA in the nucleus. Our numerical model suggests that a positive feed-forward mechanism inhibiting nuclear phosphatase activity - possibly mediated by DARPP-32 (also known as PPP1R1B) - could be responsible for this non-linear pattern of nuclear PKA response, allowing for a better detection of the transient dopamine signals that are often associated with reward-mediated learning.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf