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  • 1.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Review: Design epistemology and curriculum planning2018In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 109-112Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Buckley, Jeffrey
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Seery, Niall
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Balancing curriculum intent with expected student responses to designerly tasks2018In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 26-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design activities form an extensive part of design and technology education with a link being posited within the pertinent literature between the cognitive activity of learning and the cognitive activity of design. It is therefore critical that design educators’ understand the effects that design constraints can have on the learning process. This paper aims to examine the potential to affect student responses and associated learning from design tasks based on the manipulation of task variables. A study was designed to examine the effects of two modelling systems – one parametric and one non-parametric – on the thought processes and design journeys of the students. The findings suggest that the use of parametric modelling can emphasis student thinking on technical considerations while the use of a freeform moulding CAD system affords a more creative orientation. Qualitative findings demonstrate the capacity of students to select appropriate strategies to complete the design task, further indicating that relaxing design constraints can support student learning in design activities. Considering curricular intentions to develop both technical and creative competencies, this study presents empirical findings illustrating how teachers can strategically design tasks which balance expected student responses with intended learning outcomes.

  • 3.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Practicing Design Judgement through Intention-Focused Course Curricula2015In: Design and Technology Education: An International Journal, ISSN 1360-1431, E-ISSN 2040-8633, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 47-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on how design judgement can be practiced in design education, as explored in several iterations of an advanced course in interaction design. The students were probed to address four separate design tasks based on distinct high-level intentions, i.e. to 1) take societal responsibility, 2) to generate profit, 3) to explore a new concept, and 4) to trigger reflection and debate. This structure, we found, served as a valuable tool in our context for bringing important topics to discussion in class and for actively practicing design judgement. We discuss what we see as the main qualities of this approach in relation to more conventional course structures in this area, with a focus directed more towards aspects of methodology, specific interaction techniques, and design principles more generally.

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