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  • 1.
    Friberg, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Commentary on Polak How short is the shortest metric subdivision?2017In: Empirical Musicology Review, ISSN 1559-5749, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 227-228Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary relates to the target paper by Polak on the shortest metric subdivision by presenting measurements on West-African drum music. It provides new evidence that the perceptual lower limit of tone duration is within the range 80-100 ms. Using fairly basic measurement techniques in combination with a musical analysis of the content, the original results in this study represents a valuable addition to the literature. Considering the relevance for music listening, further research would be valuable for determining and understanding the nature of this perceptual limit.

  • 2.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Expressivity and musical shape in turntablism: Response to Greasley and Prior2013In: Empirical Musicology Review, ISSN 1559-5749, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary to Greasley and Prior’s paper “Mixtapes and turntablism: DJs’ perspective on musical shape” extends the findings of the study by looking at the turntablism perspective. First, a general discussion on the study’s method and background is given. Then, the role of turntables as musical instruments in creating musical shape is outlined. Finally, some relationships between turntablism techniques, expressive performances and musical shape are presented. In general, the findings in the study support previously published studies in this insufficiently researched area.

  • 3.
    House, David
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Response to Fred Cummins: Looking for Rhythm in Speech.2012In: Empirical Musicology Review, ISSN 1559-5749, E-ISSN 1559-5749, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 45-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This commentary briefly reviews three aspects of rhythm in speech. The first concerns the issues of what to measure and how measurements should relate to rhythm's communicative functions. The second relates to how tonal and durational features of speech contribute to the percept of rhythm, noting evidence that indicates such features can be tightly language-specific. The third aspect addressed is how bodily gestures integrate with and enhance the communicative functions of speech rhythm.

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