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  • 1.
    Barchitta, Martina
    et al.
    Univ Catania, Dept Med & Surg Sci & Adv Technol GF Ingrassia, I-95123 Catania, Italy.;Univ Catania, LaPoSS Lab Policies & Social Serv, I-95121 Catania, Italy..
    Quattrocchi, Annalisa
    Univ Nicosia, Med Sch, Dept Primary Care & Populat Hlth, CY-2414 Nicosia, Cyprus..
    Maugeri, Andrea
    Univ Catania, Dept Med & Surg Sci & Adv Technol GF Ingrassia, I-95123 Catania, Italy..
    La Rosa, Maria Clara
    Univ Catania, Dept Med & Surg Sci & Adv Technol GF Ingrassia, I-95123 Catania, Italy..
    La Mastra, Claudia
    Univ Catania, Dept Med & Surg Sci & Adv Technol GF Ingrassia, I-95123 Catania, Italy..
    Basile, Guido
    Univ Catania, Dept Gen Surg & Med Surg Specialties, I-95123 Catania, Italy..
    Giuffrida, Giovanni
    Univ Catania, LaPoSS Lab Policies & Social Serv, I-95121 Catania, Italy.;Univ Catania, Bench Srl, Dept Social & Polit Sci, I-95131 Catania, Italy..
    Mazzeo Rinaldi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Univ Catania, LaPoSS Lab Policies & Social Serv, I-95121 Catania, Italy.;Univ Catania, Bench Srl, Dept Social & Polit Sci, I-95131 Catania, Italy..
    Murolo, Giuseppe
    DASOE, Dept Hlth Sicilian Reg, I-90145 Palermo, Italy..
    Agodi, Antonella
    Univ Catania, Dept Med & Surg Sci & Adv Technol GF Ingrassia, I-95123 Catania, Italy.;Univ Catania, LaPoSS Lab Policies & Social Serv, I-95121 Catania, Italy..
    The "Obiettivo Antibiotico" Campaign on Prudent Use of Antibiotics in Sicily, Italy: The Pilot Phase2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 3077-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a focus of the World Health Organization, which proposes educational interventions targeting the public and healthcare professionals. Here, we present the first attempt at a regionwide multicomponent campaign in Sicily (Italy), called "Obiettivo Antibiotico", which aims to raise the awareness of prudent use of antibiotics in the public and in healthcare professionals. The campaign was designed by an interdisciplinary academic team, and an interactive website was populated with different materials, including key messages, letters, slogans, posters, factsheets, leaflets, and videos. The campaign was launched in November 2018 and, as of 21 December 2018, the website had a total of 1159 unique visitors, of which 190 became champions by pledging to take simple actions to support the fight against AMR. Data from social media showed that the audience was between 18 and 54 years of age, with a high proportion of female participants (64%). Interestingly, the LinkedIn page received more than 1200 followers, and Facebook 685 followers. The number of actions taken (pledges) by the audience was 458, evenly divided between experts (53%) and the general public (47%). Additional efforts are needed to reach more people, thus future efforts should focus on further promotion within the Sicilian region to sustain the engagement with the campaign.

  • 2.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Helena, Tobiasson
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Human Centered Technology, Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Mälardalen University.
    Walking Outdoors during Seminars Improved Perceived Seminar Quality and Sense of Well-Being among Participants2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour are a growing health problem globally. Physical inactivity is associated with increased risk of numerous ailments, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Our primary aim was to perform a feasibility study on how to incorporate physical activity among students and teachers in regular teaching activities. The second aim was to investigate how students and teachers perceived the differences between outdoor walking seminars and regular indoor seminars. By transforming an on-campus course into a blended course, we were able to conduct seminars outdoors in nearby nature while walking. These walking seminars were evaluated among 131 students and nine teachers leading the walking seminars. The responses to the student survey and teacher interviews indicate that discussions, sense of well-being and the general quality of the seminar improved, regardless of how physically active participants were the rest of the time. The study shows one way to increase physical activity with small means; in our case, a reorganization of how we prepared for the seminars which allowed for walking discussions.

  • 3.
    Dahlgren, Gunilla
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Liv, Per
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Öhberg, Fredrik
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Radiat Phys, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Järvholm, Lisbeth Slunga
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Karolinska Inst, IMM Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rehn, Börje
    Umeå Univ, Dept Community Med & Rehabil, Physiotherapy, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Ratings of Hand Activity and Force Levels among Women and Men Who Perform Identical Hand-Intensive Work Tasks2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 24, p. 16706-, article id 16706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We compared hand activity and force ratings in women and men doing identical hand-intensive work tasks. Musculoskeletal disorders are more common in women and hand-intensive work leads to an increased risk of these disorders. Knowledge of the gender influence in the rating of work exposure is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether women and men performing identical hand-intensive work tasks were equally rated using hand activity and normalized peak force levels with the Hand Activity Threshold Limit Value((R)). Fifty-six workers participated, comprising 28 women-men pairs. Four observers-two woman-man pairs-were also involved. Self-ratings and observers' ratings of hand activity and force level were collected. The results of these ratings showed no significant gender differences in self-rated hand activity and force, as well as observer-rated hand activity. However, there was a significant gender difference in the observer-rated force, where the women were rated higher (mean (SD): women 3.9 (2.7), men 3.1 (1.8) (p = 0.01)). This difference remained significant in the adjusted model (p = 0.04) with grip strength and forearm-finger anthropometrics. The results provide new insights that observers' estimates of force can be higher in women compared with men in the same work tasks. Force should be further investigated and preferably compared to objective measurements.

  • 4.
    Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture. Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Theorell, Töres
    Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 106 91, Sweden; Department of Global Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Office Design’s Impact on Psychosocial Work Environment and Emotional Health2024In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 21, no 4, article id 438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the association between office design and (a) the psychosocial work environment and (b) the emotional health among 4352 employees in seven different office designs. A multivariate linear regression analysis was performed with adjustments for age and educational level for men and women separately. Results show that psychosocial factors and emotional exhaustion differ between both office designs and between genders, with best outcomes in cell offices, except for psychological demands that are rated the most favourable in shared-room offices. Cell offices and small open-plan offices show a strong beneficial association with emotional exhaustion in women. Among men, hot-desking is most problematic regarding psychosocial work environment and emotional exhaustion. Women rate the psychosocial environment low in combi-office and report emotional exhaustion in small open offices.

  • 5. Dong, Yidan
    et al.
    Jin, Xu
    Wang, Jingjing
    Maimaiti, Nazhakaiti
    He, Lihua
    Wang, Fujiang
    Jin, Xianning
    Wang, Shijuan
    Zhang, Zhongbin
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Study on the Associations of Individual and Work-Related Factors with Low Back Pain among Manufacturing Workers Based on Logistic Regression and Structural Equation Model2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 4, article id 1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work-related musculoskeletal injuries are one of the major occupational health issues of the workers, especially low back pain (LBP). The aim of this study was to survey the prevalence of LBP among manufacturing workers and to identify associations of individual and work-related factors with LBP. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was performed with 1173 participating manufacturing workers. The questionnaire included individual factors, psychosocial and physical exposures, and musculoskeletal discomfort. It was analyzed by logistic regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). The 1-year prevalence of LBP among Chinese manufacturing workers was 33.6%. Logistic regression analysis showed that job tenure, awkward postures, vibration and job demand were positively-while social support and job control were negatively associated with LBP (p < 0.05). The SEM results indicated that, as shown in other studies, job types, job tenure, postural load, high job demand, low job control and vibration were directly associated with LBP, but also that job types, high job demand, low social support and vibration may have indirect effects on LBP-mediated by postural load.

  • 6. Egidi, G.
    et al.
    Zambon, I.
    Tombolin, I.
    Salvati, L.
    Cividino, S.
    Seifollahi-Aghmiuni, S.
    Kalantari, Z.
    Unraveling latent aspects of urban expansion: Desertification risk reveals more2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 11, article id 4001Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Sociol & Work Sci, S-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Williamsson, Anna
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Mat & Prod Div, S-43153 Mölndal, Sweden..
    Skagert, Katrin
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Mat & Prod Div, S-43153 Mölndal, Sweden..
    How Conditions and Resources Connected to Digital Management Systems and Remote Work Are Associated with Sustainable Work2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 23, article id 15731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current state of work-life transformation will see more white-collar work being performed remotely using digital management systems. There is, however, a lack of research on factors and resources contributing to sustainable work when working remotely using digital management systems. The aim of this study was to study the conditions and resources connected to digital management systems and remote work, and their associations with sustainable work, in terms of process quality, trust, and sense of coherence, when working remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic. An analytical cross-sectional study was performed. Questionnaire data from white-collar employees (n = 484) in two private companies were analyzed with regression models, focusing on the importance of the conditions and resources connected to digital management systems and remote work, stratified by working from home or at the office. The results showed digital conditions and resources being associated with indicators of sustainable work. Furthermore, the results showed that social work relations were additional important explanatory factors for sustainable remote work. This study contributes to the development of a new post-pandemic work-life balance by concluding that sustainable remote work needs to be ensured by functional digital management systems and adequate leadership supporting the development of a positive team and learning climate.

  • 8.
    Henriksson, Greger
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hagman, Olle
    Andreasson, Hakan
    Environmentally Reformed Travel Habits During the 2006 Congestion Charge Trial in Stockholm-A Qualitative Study2011In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 8, no 8, p. 3202-3215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour.

  • 9.
    Islam, Md Aminul
    et al.
    COVID-19 Diagnostic Lab, Department of Microbiology, Noakhali Science and Technology University, Noakhali, 3814, Bangladesh, Noakhali; Advanced Molecular Lab, Department of Microbiology, President Abdul Hamid Medical College, Karimganj, 2310, Bangladesh.
    Hasan, Mohammad Nayeem
    Department of Statistics, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114, Bangladesh.
    Tiwari, Ananda
    Department of Health Security, Expert Microbiology Research Unit, Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, 70701, Finland.
    Raju, Md Abdul Wahid
    Department of Statistics, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114, Bangladesh.
    Jannat, Fateha
    Department of Public Health, North East University, Sylhet, 3100, Bangladesh.
    Sangkham, Sarawut
    Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Phayao, Muang District, Phayao, 56000, Thailand, Muang District, Phayao.
    Shammas, Mahaad Issa
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering, Dhofar University, P.O. Box 2509, Salalah, 211, Oman, P.O. Box 2509.
    Sharma, Prabhakar
    School of Ecology and Environment Studies, Nalanda University, Rajgir, 803116, India.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Kumar, Manish
    Sustainability Cluster, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun, 248007, India; Escuela de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Monterey, Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur, Monterrey, 64849, Mexico, Campus Monterey, Eugenio Garza Sada 2501 Sur.
    Correlation of Dengue and Meteorological Factors in Bangladesh: A Public Health Concern2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 6, article id 5152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family (which causes Dengue fever), and an arthropod-transmitted human viral infection. Bangladesh is well known for having some of Asia’s most vulnerable Dengue outbreaks, with climate change, its location, and it’s dense population serving as the main contributors. For speculation about DENV outbreak characteristics, it is crucial to determine how meteorological factors correlate with the number of cases. This study used five time series models to observe the trend and forecast Dengue cases. Current data-based research has also applied four statistical models to test the relationship between Dengue-positive cases and meteorological parameters. Datasets were used from NASA for meteorological parameters, and daily DENV cases were obtained from the Directorate General of Health Service (DGHS) open-access websites. During the study period, the mean of DENV cases was 882.26 ± 3993.18, ranging between a minimum of 0 to a maximum of 52,636 daily confirmed cases. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient between climatic variables and Dengue incidence indicated that no substantial relationship exists between daily Dengue cases and wind speed, temperature, and surface pressure (Spearman’s rho; r = −0.007, p > 0.05; r = 0.085, p > 0.05; and r = −0.086, p > 0.05, respectively). Still, a significant relationship exists between daily Dengue cases and dew point, relative humidity, and rainfall (r = 0.158, p < 0.05; r = 0.175, p < 0.05; and r = 0.138, p < 0.05, respectively). Using the ARIMAX and GA models, the relationship for Dengue cases with wind speed is −666.50 [95% CI: −1711.86 to 378.86] and −953.05 [−2403.46 to 497.36], respectively. A similar negative relation between Dengue cases and wind speed was also determined in the GLM model (IRR = 0.98). Dew point and surface pressure also represented a negative correlation in both ARIMAX and GA models, respectively, but the GLM model showed a positive association. Additionally, temperature and relative humidity showed a positive correlation with Dengue cases (105.71 and 57.39, respectively, in the ARIMAX, 633.86, and 200.03 in the GA model). In contrast, both temperature and relative humidity showed negative relation with Dengue cases in the GLM model. In the Poisson regression model, windspeed has a substantial significant negative connection with Dengue cases in all seasons. Temperature and rainfall are significantly and positively associated with Dengue cases in all seasons. The association between meteorological factors and recent outbreak data is the first study where we are aware of the use of maximum time series models in Bangladesh. Taking comprehensive measures against DENV outbreaks in the future can be possible through these findings, which can help fellow researchers and policymakers.

  • 10.
    Islam, Md. Aminul
    et al.
    President Abdul Hamid Med Coll, Dept Microbiol, Adv Mol Lab, Karimganj 2310, Bangladesh.;Noakhali Sci & Technol Univ, Dept Microbiol, COVID 19 Diagnost Lab, Noakhali 3814, Bangladesh..
    Sangkham, Sarawut
    Univ Phayao, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Environm Hlth, Muang Dist 56000, Phayao, Thailand..
    Tiwari, Ananda
    Univ Helsinki, Fac Vet Med, Dept Food Hyg & Environm Hlth, Helsinki 00014, Finland.;Finnish Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Hlth Secur, Expert Microbiol Res Unit, Kuopio 70701, Finland..
    Vadiati, Meysam
    Univ Calif Davis, Hubert H Humphrey Fellowship Program, Global Affairs, 10 Coll Pk, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Hasan, Mohammad Nayeem
    Shahjalal Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Stat, Sylhet 3114, Bangladesh.;Food Hungry, Joint Rohingya Response Program, Coxs Bazar 4700, Bangladesh..
    Noor, Syed Toukir Ahmed
    Shahjalal Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Stat, Sylhet 3114, Bangladesh..
    Mumin, Jubayer
    Platform Med & Dent Soc, Dhaka 1214, Bangladesh..
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Sherchan, Samendra P. P.
    Morgan State Univ, Dept Biol, Baltimore, MD 11428 USA.;Tulane Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Trop Med, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, New Orleans, LA 70118 USA..
    Association between Global Monkeypox Cases and Meteorological Factors2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 23, article id 15638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of an outbreak of Monkeypox disease (MPXD) is caused by a contagious zoonotic Monkeypox virus (MPXV) that has spread globally. Yet, there is no study investigating the effect of climatic changes on MPXV transmission. Thus, studies on the changing epidemiology, evolving nature of the virus, and ecological niche are highly paramount. Determination of the role of potential meteorological drivers including temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, dew point, wind speed, and surface pressure is beneficial to understand the MPXD outbreak. This study examines the changes in MPXV cases over time while assessing the meteorological characteristics that could impact these disparities from the onset of the global outbreak. To conduct this data-based research, several well-accepted statistical techniques including Simple Exponential Smoothing (SES), Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), Automatic forecasting time-series model (Prophet), and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average with Explanatory Variables (ARIMAX) were applied to delineate the correlation of the meteorological factors on global daily Monkeypox cases. Data on MPXV cases including affected countries spanning from 6 May 2022, to 9 November 2022, from global databases and meteorological data were used to evaluate the developed models. According to the ARIMAX model, the results showed that temperature, relative humidity, and surface pressure have a positive impact [(51.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): -274.55 to 377.68), (17.32, 95% CI: -83.71 to 118.35) and (23.42, 95% CI: -9.90 to 56.75), respectively] on MPXV cases. In addition, dew/frost point, precipitation, and wind speed show a significant negative impact on MPXD cases. The Prophet model showed a significant correlation with rising MPXD cases, although the trend predicts peak values while the overall trend increases. This underscores the importance of immediate and appropriate preventive measures (timely preparedness and proactive control strategies) with utmost priority against MPXD including awareness-raising programs, the discovery, and formulation of effective vaccine candidate(s), prophylaxis and therapeutic regimes, and management strategies.

  • 11.
    Jaldestad, Ellen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Blom, Philip
    Scania CV AB, Hlth & Work Environm, NL-8000 AP Zwolle, Netherlands..
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Factors Influencing Retirement Decisions among Blue-Collar Workers in a Global Manufacturing Company-Implications for Age Management from A System Perspective2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 20, article id 10945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maintenance of older workers and determining the appropriate age for retirement are growing issues related to the fact that fewer people, still active in working life, have to provide for more non-working people due to increased life expectancy. As a result, retirement age has started to rise in many countries, and employers need to find ways to maintain an older and healthy work force, not least to avoid the loss of important experience. The aim of the current study was to increase the knowledge of factors influencing the retirement decisions among blue-collar workers in different national settings. A survey and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 100 blue-collar workers in Sweden, the Netherlands, and France, aged 55 years and older, within a global manufacturing company. Based on the results, implications for companies' age management strategies were discussed from a system perspective. Factors contributing to both retirement and to a prolonged work life were found on individual, organisational, and societal levels. This indicates the importance of a system perspective when planning for age management interventions.

  • 12.
    Jutengren, Göran
    et al.
    Univ Borås, Dept Work Life & Social Welf, SE-50190 Borås, Sweden..
    Jaldestad, Ellen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Sociol & Work Sci, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics.
    The Potential Importance of Social Capital and Job Crafting for Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction among Health-Care Employees2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 12, article id 4272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (1) Background: Both employees and organizations benefit from a work environment characterized by work engagement and job satisfaction. This study examines the influence of work-group social capital on individuals' work engagement, job satisfaction, and job crafting. In addition, the mediating effect of job crafting between social capital on the one side and job satisfaction and work engagement on the other side was analyzed. (2) Methods: This study used data from 250 health-care employees in Sweden who had completed a questionnaire at two time points (six to eight months apart). Analyses of separate cross-lagged panel designs were conducted using structural regression modeling with manifest variables. (3) Results: Social capital was predictive of both job satisfaction and work engagement over time. The results also indicated that higher degrees of social capital was predictive of more cognitive and relational, but not task-related job crafting over time. There was no clear evidence for a mediating effect of job crafting for social capital to work engagement or job satisfaction. (4) Conclusion: It would be beneficial for the health-care sector to consider setting up the organizations to promote social capital within work groups. Individual workers would gain in well-being and the organization is likely to gain in efficiency and lower turnover rates.

  • 13. Kahlmeier, Sonja
    et al.
    Boig, Esther Anaya
    Castro Fernandez, Alberto
    Smeds, Emilia
    Benvenuti, Fabrizio
    Eriksson, Ulf
    Iacorossi, Francesco
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.
    Panis, Luc Int
    Rojas-Rueda, David
    Wegener, Sandra
    Nazelle, Audrey de
    Assessing the Policy Environment for Active Mobility in Cities—Development and Feasibility of the PASTA Cycling and Walking Policy Environment Score2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 986-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of setting a policy focus on promoting cycling and walking as sustainable and healthy modes of transport is increasingly recognized. However, to date a science-driven scoring system to assess the policy environment for cycling and walking is lacking. In this study, spreadsheet-based scoring systems for cycling and walking were developed, including six dimensions (cycling/walking culture, social acceptance, perception of traffic safety, advocacy, politics and urban planning). Feasibility was tested using qualitative data from pre-specified sections of semi-standardized interview and workshop reports from a European research project in seven cities, assessed independently by two experts. Disagreements were resolved by discussions of no more than 75 minutes per city. On the dimension “perception of traffic safety”, quantitative panel data were used. While the interrater agreement was fair, feasibility was confirmed in general. Validity testing against social norms towards active travel, modal split and network length was encouraging for the policy area of cycling. Rating the policy friendliness for cycling and walking separately was found to be appropriate, as different cities received the highest scores for each. Replicating this approach in a more standardized way would pave the way towards a transparent, evidence-based system for benchmarking policy approaches of cities towards cycling and walking.

  • 14.
    Langenskiöld, Charlotta
    et al.
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 4, Stockholm, SE-113 65, Sweden.
    Berg, Annelie
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 4, Stockholm, SE-113 65, Sweden.
    Yang, Liyun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solnavägen 4, Stockholm, SE-113 65, Sweden.
    The Effect of Corrective and Encouraging Accumulated Vibrotactile Feedback on Work Technique Training and Motivation: A Pilot Study2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 18, article id 6741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Encouraging feedback is shown to increase motivation and facilitate learning in different settings, though there is a lack of knowledge of applying it in work technique training. This pilot study aimed to evaluate two accumulated vibrotactile feedback strategies for work technique training using a smart workwear system. Eight women and two men participated in the study. They were divided into two groups, receiving the corrective feedback or the combined corrective and encouraging feedback while doing simulated manual handling tasks in a lab environment. Questionnaires and semi-structured interviews were used to evaluate the motivation, learning, and user experiences. In this small sample size, we saw that both groups significantly improved their work technique of upper arm and trunk postures, and no significant difference between groups was seen. In addition, both groups reported increased ergonomic awareness, were satisfied with the feedback training, and considered the system useful. However, the combined feedback group had slightly lower ratings of motivation and more negative experiences of the corrective feedback itself compared to the corrective feedback group. Both groups had positive experiences with the encouraging feedback. Future research should consider investigating the long-term learning effects of using solely corrective or encouraging accumulated feedback for work technique training with such systems.

  • 15.
    Lorentzen, Johnny C.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Integrat Toxicol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Reg Stockholm, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, SE-11365 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Johanson, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Integrat Toxicol, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Björk, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sustainable Buildings.
    Stensson, Sofia
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, SE-50115 Borås, Sweden..
    Overcrowding and Hazardous Dwelling Condition Characteristics: A Systematic Search and Scoping Review of Relevance for Health2022In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 23, article id 15542Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crowding in dwellings is an important public health issue. We hypothesize that overcrowding may cause indirect health effects by adversely affecting the dwelling itself, for example, by increasing dampness leading to mold. We therefore performed a systematic search and a scoping review on overcrowding leading to dwelling condition characteristics of relevance for health. A literature search was performed using the PubMed and Scopus databases up to 5 March 2021. The search yielded 100 records with relevant information. We found that overcrowding is defined in numerous ways and often address "socially deprived" populations. Six studies report associations of overcrowding with at least one dwelling condition characteristic, namely lead, cadmium, microorganism distribution, dust mite and cockroach allergens in dust, cockroach infestation, peeling paint, and mold. One of the studies reports associations between several characteristics, e.g., association of mold with cleanliness and rodent infestation, and points out the common use of pesticides. Additional characteristics were extracted from the remaining 94 records, without data on statistical associations with overcrowding. Our review suggests that multiple potentially hazardous dwelling condition characteristics often coincide in overcrowded dwellings. The epidemiological attribution of health effects to any characteristic is therefore difficult. Causal relationships are even more difficult to establish, as overcrowding is also associated with a range of social and other circumstances that may affect health. The complexity should be considered by scientists and practitioners dealing with overcrowding in dwellings.

  • 16. Ma, Y.
    et al.
    Bring, A.
    Kalantari, Z.
    Destouni, G.
    Potential for hydroclimatically driven shifts in infectious disease outbreaks: The case of tularemia in high-latitude regions2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 19, article id 3717Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Ma, Y.
    et al.
    Vigouroux, G.
    Kalantari, Z.
    Goldenberg, R.
    Destouni, G.
    Implications of projected hydroclimatic change for tularemia outbreaks in high-risk areas across sweden2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 18, p. 1-13, article id 6786Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. McDonald, Nick
    et al.
    McKenna, Lucy
    Vining, Rebecca
    Doyle, Brian
    Liang, Junli
    Ward, Marie E.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management & Technology.
    Geary, Una
    Guilfoyle, John
    Shuhaiber, Arwa
    Hernandez, Julio
    Fogarty, Mary
    Healy, Una
    Tallon, Christopher
    Brennan, Rob
    Evaluation of an Access-Risk-Knowledge (ARK) Platform for Governance of Risk and Change in Complex Socio-Technical Systems2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 23, p. 12572-12572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three key challenges to a whole-system approach to process improvement in health systems are the complexity of socio-technical activity, the capacity to change purposefully, and the consequent capacity to proactively manage and govern the system. The literature on healthcare improvement demonstrates the persistence of these problems. In this project, the Access-Risk-Knowledge (ARK) Platform, which supports the implementation of improvement projects, was deployed across three healthcare organisations to address risk management for the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). In each organisation, quality and safety experts initiated an ARK project and participated in a follow-up survey and focus group. The platform was then evaluated against a set of fifteen needs related to complex system transformation. While the results highlighted concerns about the platform’s usability, feedback was generally positive regarding its effectiveness and potential value in supporting HCAI risk management. The ARK Platform addresses the majority of identified needs for system transformation; other needs were validated in the trial or are undergoing development. This trial provided a starting point for a knowledge-based solution to enhance organisational governance and develop shared knowledge through a Community of Practice that will contribute to sustaining and generalising that change.

  • 19.
    Nyman, Teresia
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden;Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rhén, Ida-Märta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, SE-113 65 Stockholm, Sweden;Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Peter J.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden;Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Kristina
    Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden;Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kjellberg, Katarina
    Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, SE-113 65 Stockholm, Sweden;Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Per
    Department of Occupational Health Science and Psychology, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, SE-801 76 Gävle, Sweden.
    Fan, Xuelong
    Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsman, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Stockholm County Council, SE-113 65 Stockholm, Sweden;Unit of Occupational Medicine, Institute of Environmental Medicine (IMM), Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Reliability and Validity of Six Selected Observational Methods for Risk Assessment of Hand Intensive and Repetitive Work2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 5505-5505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk assessments of hand-intensive and repetitive work are commonly done using observational methods, and it is important that the methods are reliable and valid. However, comparisons of the reliability and validity of methods are hampered by differences in studies, e.g., regarding the background and competence of the observers, the complexity of the observed work tasks and the statistical methodology. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate six risk assessment methods, concerning inter- and intra-observer reliability and concurrent validity, using the same methodological design and statistical parameters in the analyses. Twelve experienced ergonomists were recruited to perform risk assessments of ten video-recorded work tasks twice, and consensus assessments for the concurrent validity were carried out by three experts. All methods’ total-risk linearly weighted kappa values for inter-observer reliability (when all tasks were set to the same duration) were lower than 0.5 (0.15–0.45). Moreover, the concurrent validity values were in the same range with regards to total-risk linearly weighted kappa (0.31–0.54). Although these levels are often considered as being fair to substantial, they denote agreements lower than 50% when the expected agreement by chance has been compensated for. Hence, the risk of misclassification is substantial. The intra-observer reliability was only somewhat higher (0.16–0.58). Regarding the methods ART (Assessment of repetitive tasks of the upper limbs) and HARM (Hand Arm Risk Assessment Method), it is worth noting that the work task duration has a high impact in the risk level calculation, which needs to be taken into account in studies of reliability. This study indicates that when experienced ergonomists use systematic methods, the reliability is low. As seen in other studies, especially assessments of hand/wrist postures were difficult to rate. In light of these results, complementing observational risk assessments with technical methods should be considered, especially when evaluating the effects of ergonomic interventions.

  • 20. Pereira, Laura
    et al.
    Karpouzoglou, Timon
    Wageningen University, Netherlands.
    Doshi, Samir
    Frantzeskaki, Niki
    Organising a Safe Space for Navigating Social-Ecological Transformations to Sustainability2015In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 6027-6044Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for developing socially just living conditions for the world’s growing population whilst keeping human societies within a ‘safe operating space’ has become a modern imperative. This requires transformative changes in the dominant social norms, behaviours, governance and management regimes that guide human responses in areas such as urban ecology, public health, resource security (e.g., food, water, energy access), economic development and biodiversity conservation. However, such systemic transformations necessitate experimentation in public arenas of exchange and a deepening of processes that can widen multi-stakeholder learning. We argue that there is an emergent potential in bridging the sustainability transitions and resilience approaches to create new scientific capacity that can support large-scale social-ecological transformations (SETs) to sustainability globally, not just in the West. In this article, we elucidate a set of guiding principles for the design of a ‘safe space’ to encourage stronger interactions between these research areas and others that are relevant to the challenges faced. We envisage new opportunities for transdisciplinary collaboration that will develop an adaptive and evolving community of practice. In particular, we emphasise the great opportunity for engaging with the role of emerging economies in facilitating safe space experimentation.

  • 21.
    Svarts, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management & Technology.
    Urciuoli, Luca
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management & Technology.
    Thorell, Anders
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Management & Technology.
    Does Focus Improve Performance in Elective Surgery?: A Study of Obesity Surgery in Sweden2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 18, article id 6682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies have found positive effects from hospital focus on both quality and cost. Some studies indicate that certain patient segments benefit from focus, while others have worse outcomes in focused hospital departments. The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between hospital focus and performance in elective surgery. We studied obesity surgery procedures performed in Sweden in 2016 (5152 patients), using data from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) complemented by a survey of all clinics that performed obesity surgery. We examined focus at two levels of the organization: hospital level and department level. We hypothesized that higher proportions of obesity surgery patients in the hospital, and higher proportions of obesity surgery procedures in the department, would be associated with better performance. These hypotheses were tested using multilevel regression analysis, while controlling for patient characteristics and procedural volume. We found that focus was associated with improved outcomes in terms of reduced complications and shorter procedure times. These positive relationships were present at both hospital and department level, but the effect was larger at the department level. The findings imply that focus is a viable strategy to improve quality and reduce costs for patients undergoing elective surgery. For these patients, general hospitals should consider implementing organizationally separate units for patients undergoing elective surgery.

  • 22.
    Vivekanand, Aashlesha Chekkala
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Chemical Engineering.
    Atasoy, Merve
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering, Resource recovery. UNLOCK, Wageningen University & Research and Technical University Delft, Wageningen, 6708PB, The Netherlands.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Cetecioglu, Zeynep
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Statistical Analysis of SARS-CoV-2 Using Wastewater-Based Data of Stockholm, Sweden2023In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 20, no 5, article id 4181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An approach based on wastewater epidemiology can be used to monitor the COVID-19 pandemic by assessing the gene copy number of SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater. In the present study, we statistically analyzed such data from six inlets of three wastewater treatment plants, covering six regions of Stockholm, Sweden, collected over an approximate year period (week 16 of 2020 to week 22 of 2021). SARS-CoV-2 gene copy number and population-based biomarker PMMoV, as well as clinical data, such as the number of positive cases, intensive care unit numbers, and deaths, were analyzed statistically using correlations and principal component analysis (PCA). Despite the population differences, the PCA for the Stockholm dataset showed that the case numbers are well grouped across wastewater treatment plants. Furthermore, when considering the data from the whole of Stockholm, the wastewater characteristics (flow rate m3/day, PMMoV Ct value, and SARS-CoV gene copy number) were significantly correlated with the public health agency’s report of SARS-CoV-2 infection rates (0.419 to 0.95, p-value < 0.01). However, while the PCA results showed that the case numbers for each wastewater treatment plant were well grouped concerning PC1 (37.3%) and PC2 (19.67%), the results from the correlation analysis for the individual wastewater treatment plants showed varied trends. SARS-CoV-2 fluctuations can be accurately predicted through statistical analyses of wastewater-based epidemiology, as demonstrated in this study.

  • 23.
    Xue, Jiao
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Design, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Liu, Wei
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sustainable Buildings.
    Liu, Kuixing
    Tianjin Univ, Sch Architecture, Tianjin 300072, Peoples R China..
    Influence of Thermal Environment on Attendance and Adaptive Behaviors in Outdoor Spaces: A Study in a Cold-Climate University Campus2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 11, article id 6139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creating a favorable thermal environment in an outdoor space is essential for attracting more occupants to outdoor areas and vitalizing a city. It is possible to study occupants' needs in an outdoor thermal environment by observing their attendance and behaviors, since people may exhibit certain adaptive measures, such as seeking shade, using parasols, etc., "vote with their feet", or even leave the space, if they feel uncomfortable. In order to investigate the influence of thermal environment on attendance and adaptive behaviors in outdoor spaces, in this study we carried out field campaigns in a university campus in a cold-climate city. The thermal environment was monitored, while surveys of thermal perceptions and observations of attendance and adaptive behaviors were conducted. Through the data analyses, it was found that the thermal environment had a great impact on the attendance of optional activities, but necessary activities were not influenced. The greatest influence on attendance came from air temperature. The influences of wind and humidity on attendance were found to be coupled with that of air temperature. Adaptive behaviors, such as seeking shade, using parasols, changing clothes, and changing the lengths of stay, were also greatly influenced by air temperature.

  • 24.
    Öhrn, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Wahlstrom, Viktoria
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Harder, Mette S.
    Umeå Univ, Umeå Sch Architecture, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Pettersson-Stromback, Anita
    Umeå Univ, Dept Psychol, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Danielsson, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Olsson, David
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Andersson, Martin
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Jarvholm, Lisbeth Slunga
    Umeå Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Sect Sustainable Hlth, S-90187 Umeå, Sweden..
    Productivity, Satisfaction, Work Environment and Health after Relocation to an Activity-Based Flex Office-The Active Office Design Study2021In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 14, article id 7640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation of activity-based flex offices (AFOs) are becoming increasingly common. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an AFO on perceived productivity, satisfaction, work environment and health. Questionnaire data from the longitudinal, quasi-experimental Active Office Design Study was used. The study evaluates a public organization relocating staff to either an AFO or to cell offices. Measures from baseline, 6 and 18 months after relocation, were analyzed. Employees in the AFO experienced a decreased productivity and satisfaction with the office design. Lack of privacy as well as increased noise disturbance, less satisfaction with sit comfort and work posture were reported. Employees in the AFO with work tasks requiring a high degree of concentration experienced lower productivity while those with a high proportion of teamwork rated productivity to be continually high. No significant group differences were found between the two office types in general health, cognitive stress, salutogenic health indicators or pain in the neck, shoulder or back. The study highlights the importance of taking work characteristics into account in the planning and implementation process of an AFO. Flexible and interactive tasks seem more appropriate in an AFO, whereas individual tasks demanding concentration seem less fit.

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