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  • 1. Ahmed, Mona
    et al.
    Baumgartner, Roland
    Aldi, Silvia
    Dusart, Philip
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Hedin, Ulf
    Gustafsson, Bjorn
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Human serum albumin-based probes for molecular targeting of macrophage scavenger receptors2019In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 14, p. 3723-3741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Inflammation and accumulation of macrophages are key features of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. The ability of macrophages to take up molecular probes can be exploited in new clinical imaging methods for the detection of unstable atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated whether modifications of human serum albumin (HSA) could be used to target macrophages efficiently in vitro. Materials and methods: Maleylated and aconitylated HSA were compared with unmodified HSA. Fluorescent or radiolabeled (Zr-89) modified HSA was used in in vitro experiments to study cellular uptake by differentiated THP-1 cells and primary human macrophages. The time course of uptake was evaluated by flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, real-time microscopy and radioactivity measurements. The involvement of scavenger receptors (SR-Al, SR-B2, LOX-1) was assessed by knockdown experiments using RNA interference, by blocking experiments and by assays of competition by modified low-density lipoprotein. Results: Modified HSA was readily taken up by different macrophages. Uptake was mediated nonexclusively via the scavenger receptor SR-Al (encoded by the MSR1 gene). Knockdown of CD36 and ORL1 had no influence on the uptake. Modified HSA was preferentially taken up by human macrophages compared with other vascular cell types such as endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Conclusions: Modified Zr-89-labeled HSA probes were recognized by different subsets of polarized macrophages, and maleylated HSA may be a promising radiotracer for radio-nuclide imaging of macrophage-rich inflammatory vascular diseases.

  • 2. Barrefelt, Åsa
    et al.
    Saghafian, Maryam
    Kuiper, Raoul
    Ye, Fei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Egri, Gabriella
    Klickermann, Moritz
    Brismar, Torkel B.
    Aspelin, Peter
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Daehne, Lars
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Biodistribution, kinetics, and biological fate of SPION microbubbles in the rat2013In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 8, p. 3241-3254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the present investigation, we studied the kinetics and biodistribution of a contrast agent consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) microbubbles containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) trapped between the PVA layers (SPION microbubbles). Methods: The biological fate of SPION microbubbles was determined in Sprague-Dawley rats after intravenous administration. Biodistribution and elimination of the microbubbles were studied in rats using magnetic resonance imaging for a period of 6 weeks. The rats were sacrificed and perfusion-fixated at different time points. The magnetic resonance imaging results obtained were compared with histopathologic findings in different organs. Results: SPION microbubbles could be detected in the liver using magnetic resonance imaging as early as 10 minutes post injection. The maximum signal was detected between 24 hours and one week post injection. Histopathology showed the presence of clustered SPION microbubbles predominantly in the lungs from the first time point investigated (10 minutes). The frequency of microbubbles declined in the pulmonary vasculature and increased in pulmonary, hepatic, and splenic macrophages over time, resulting in a relative shift from the lungs to the spleen and liver. Meanwhile, macrophages showed increasing signs of cytoplasmic iron accumulation, initially in the lungs, then followed by other organs. Conclusion: The present investigation highlights the biological behavior of SPION microbubbles, including organ distribution over time and indications for biodegradation. The present results are essential for developing SPION microbubbles as a potential contrast agent and/or a drug delivery vehicle for specific organs. Such a vehicle will facilitate the use of multimodality imaging techniques, including ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and single positron emission computed tomography, and hence improve diagnostics, therapy, and the ability to monitor the efficacy of treatment.

  • 3.
    Fontana, Jacopo Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Yin, Huijuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chen, Yun
    Florez, Ricardo
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fu, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Transport and release of colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid-coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots in human umbilical vein endothelial cells2017In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 12, p. 8615-8629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been extensively researched and developed for biomedical applications, including drug delivery and biosensing assays. Hence, it is pivotal to understand their behavior in terms of intracellular transport and toxicological effects. In this study, we focused on 3-mercaptopropionic acid-coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots (3MPA-QDs) converted from the as-grown octadecylamine-coated quantum dots (ODA-QDs) and their direct and dynamic interactions with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Live cell imaging using confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that 3MPAQDs first attached to and subsequently aggregated on HUVEC plasma membrane similar to 25 min after QD deposition. The aggregated QDs started being internalized at similar to 2 h and reached their highest internalization degree at similar to 24 h. They were released from HUVECs after similar to 48 h. During the 48 h period, the HUVECs responded normally to external stimulations, grew, proliferated and wound healed without any perceptible apoptosis. Furthermore, 1) 3MPA-QDs were internalized in newly formed LysoTracker-stained early endosomes; 2) adenosine 5'-triphosphateinduced [Ca2+](i) modulation caused a transient decrease in the fluorescence of 3MPA-QDs that were attached to the plasma membrane but a transient increase in the internalized 3MPA-QDs; and 3) fluorescence signal modulations of co-stained LysoTracker and QDs induced by the lysosomotropic agent Gly-Phe-beta-naphthylamide were spatially co-localized and temporally synchronized. Our findings suggest that 3MPA-QDs converted from ODA-QDs are a potential nontoxic fluorescent probe for future use in clinical applications. Moreover, the photophysical strategy and techniques reported in this work are easily applicable to study of direct interactions between other nanoparticles and live cells; contributing to awareness and implementation of the safe applications of nanoparticles.

  • 4.
    Yin, Huijuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fontana, Jacopo M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Solandt, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. AstraZeneca R&D, Sweden.
    Jussi, Johnny Israelsson
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xu, Hao
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brismar, Hjalmar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fu, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cellular Biophysics. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Quantum dots modulate intracellular Ca2+ level in lung epithelial cells2017In: International Journal of Nanomedicine, ISSN 1176-9114, E-ISSN 1178-2013, Vol. 12, p. 2781-2792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While adverse effects of nanoparticles on lung health have previously been proposed, few studies have addressed the direct effects of nanoparticle exposure on the airway epithelium. In this work, we examine the response of the pulmonary airway to nanoparticles by measuring intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](i)) in the Calu-3 epithelial layer stimulated by 3-mercaptopropionic-acid (3MPA) coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots (QDs). Simultaneous transient transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) decrease and global [Ca2+](i) increase in Calu-3 epithelial layer, accompanied by cell displacements, contraction, and expansion, were observed under QD deposition. This suggests that a QD-induced global [Ca2+](i) increase in the Calu-3 epithelial layer caused the transient TEER decrease. The [Ca2+](i) increase was marked and rapid in the apical region, while [Ca2+](i) decreased in the basolateral region of the epithelial layer. TEER transient response and extracellular Ca2+ entry induced by QD deposition were completely inhibited in cells treated with stretched-activated (SA) inhibitor GdCl3 and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) inhibitor BTP2 and in cells immersed in Ca2+-free medium. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) inhibitor nifedipine decreased, stabilized, and suppressed the TEER response, but did not affect the [Ca2+](i) increase, due to QD deposition. This demonstrates that the Ca2+ influx activated by QDs' mechanical stretch occurs through activation of both SA and SOCE channels. QD-induced [Ca2+](i) increase occurred in the Calu-3 epithelial layer after culturing for 15 days, while significant TEER drop only occurred after 23 days. This work provides a new perspective from which to study direct interactions between airway epithelium and nanoparticles and may help to reveal the pathologies of pulmonary disease.

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