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  • 1.
    Cappellini, Francesca
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    McCarrick, Sarah
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedberg, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Derr, Remco
    Toxys, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Hendriks, Giel
    Toxys, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mechanistic insight into reactivity and (geno)toxicity of well-characterized nanoparticles of cobalt metal and oxides2018In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 602-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An increasing use of cobalt (Co)-based nanoparticles (NPs) in different applications and exposures at occupational settings triggers the need for toxicity assessment. Improved understanding regarding the physiochemical characteristics of Co metal NPs and different oxides in combination with assessment of toxicity and mechanisms may facilitate decisions for grouping during risk assessment. The aim of this study was to gain mechanistic insights in the correlation between NP reactivity and toxicity of three different Co-based NPs (Co, CoO, and Co3O4) by using various tools for characterization, traditional toxicity assays, as well as six reporter cell lines (ToxTracker) for rapid detection of signaling pathways of relevance for carcinogenicity. The results showed cellular uptake of all NPs in lung cells and induction of DNA strand breaks and oxidative damage (comet assay) by Co and CoO NPs. In-depth studies on the ROS generation showed high reactivity of Co, lower for CoO, and no reactivity of Co3O4 NPs. The reactivity depended on the corrosion and transformation/dissolution properties of the particles and the media highlighting the role of the surface oxide and metal speciation as also confirmed by in silico modeling. By using ToxTracker, Co NPs were shown to be highly cytotoxic and induced reporters related to oxidative stress (Nrf2 signaling) and DNA strand breaks. Similar effects were observed for CoO NPs but at higher concentrations, whereas the Co3O4 NPs were inactive at all concentrations tested. In conclusion, our study suggests that Co and CoO NPs, but not Co3O4, may be grouped together for risk assessment.

  • 2. Ekvall, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Hedberg, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wallinder, Inger Odnevall
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Cedervall, Tommy
    Long-term effects of tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles in pelagic and benthic aquatic ecosystems2018In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 79-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the production and usage of nanomaterials are increasing so are the concerns related to the release of the material into nature. Tungsten carbide (WC) is widely used for its hard metal properties, although its use, in for instance tyre studs, may result in nano-sized particles ending up in nature. Here, we evaluate the potential long-term exposure effects of WC nanoparticles on a pelagic (Daphnia magna) and a benthic (Asellus aquaticus) organism. No long-term effects were observed in the benthic system with respect to population dynamics or ecosystem services. However, long-term exposure of D. magna resulted in increased time to first reproduction and, if the particles were resuspended, strong effects on survival and reproductive output. Hence, the considerable differences in acute vs. long-term exposure studies revealed here emphasize the need for more long-term studies if we are to understand the effects of nanoparticles in natural systems.

  • 3.
    McCarrick, Sarah
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wei, Zheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Moelijker, Nynke
    Toxys, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Derr, Remco
    Toxys, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Persson, Kjell-Arne
    Swerim AB, Lulea, Sweden..
    Hendriks, Giel
    Toxys, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    High variability in toxicity of welding fume nanoparticles from stainless steel in lung cells and reporter cell lines: the role of particle reactivity and solubility2019In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, no O, 2017, ISO 17075-1, Leather - Chemical Determination of Chromium(VI) Content in Leather - Part 1: Colorimetric Method, tonini JM, 1999, JOURNAL OF TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH-PART A, V58, P343 Neilly JD, 2004, TOXICOLOGY AND APPLIED PHARMACOLOGY, V196, P95 ube Fabian, 2013, ANNALS OF OCCUPATIONAL HYGIENE, V57, P6 tonini JM, 2003, CRITICAL REVIEWS IN TOXICOLOGY, V33, P61 bano A. M., 2012, CURRENT DRUG METABOLISM, V13, P284 aveen P, 2005, JOURNAL OF MATERIALS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY8th International Conference on Advances in Materials and Processing Technologies/13th International Conference on Achievements in Mechanical and Materials Engineering, MAY 16-19, 2005, Gliwice Wisla, POLAND, V164, P1113 Bucchianico Sebastiano, 2017, MUTAGENESIS, V32, P127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Millions of people in the world perform welding as their primary occupation resulting in exposure to metal-containing nanoparticles in the fumes generated. Even though health effects including airway diseases are well-known, there is currently a lack of studies investigating how different welding set-ups and conditions affect the toxicity of generated nanoparticles of the welding fume. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of nine types of welding fume particles generated via active gas shielded metal arc welding (GMAW) of chromium-containing stainless steel under different conditions and, furthermore, to correlate the toxicity to the particle characteristics. Toxicological endpoints investigated were generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and activation of ToxTracker reporter cell lines. The results clearly underline that the choice of filler material has a large influence on the toxic potential. Fume particles generated by welding with the tested flux-cored wire (FCW) were found to be more cytotoxic compared to particles generated by welding with solid wire or metal-cored wire (MCW). FCW fume particles were also the most potent in causing ROS and DNA damage and they furthermore activated reporters related to DNA double- strand breaks and p53 signaling. Interestingly, the FCW fume particles were the most soluble in PBS, releasing more chromium in the hexavalent form and manganese compared to the other fumes. These results emphasize the importance of solubility of different metal constituents of the fume particles, rather than the total metal content, for their acute toxic potential.

  • 4.
    Ogonowski, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Edlund, Ulrica
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Linde, Margareta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ek, Karin
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Liewenborg, Birgitta
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Konnecke, Oda
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Navarro, Julien R. G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Environm Sci & Analyt Chem, Svante Arrhenius Vag 8, S-11418 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Multi-level toxicity assessment of engineered cellulose nanofibrils in Daphnia magna2018In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 509-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibril (CNF)-based materials are increasingly used in industrial and commercial applications. However, the impacts of CNF on aquatic life are poorly understood, and there are concerns regarding their potential toxicity. Using a combination of standard ecotoxicological tests and feeding experiments, we assessed the effects of CNF exposure (0.206-20.6 mg/L) on the feeding (food uptake and gut residence time) and life-history traits (growth and reproduction) in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. No mortality was observed in a 48 h acute exposure at 2060 mg/L. Moreover, a 21-day exposure at low food and moderate CNF levels induced a stimulatory effect on growth, likely driven by increased filtration efficiency, and, possibly, partial assimilation of the CNF by the animals. However, at low food levels and the highest CNF concentrations, growth and reproduction were negatively affected. These responses were linked to caloric restriction caused by dilution of the food source, but not an obstruction of the alimentary canal. Finally, no apparent translocation of CNF past the alimentary canal was detected. We conclude that CNF displays a low toxic potential to filter-feeding organisms and the expected environmental risks are low.

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