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  • 1.
    Di Bucchianico, Sebastiano
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gliga, Anda R.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Åkerlund, Emma
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Skoglund, Sara
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Calcium-dependent cyto- and genotoxicity of nickel metal and nickel oxide nanoparticles in human lung cells2018In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 15, article id 32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genotoxicity is an important toxicological endpoint due to the link to diseases such as cancer. Therefore, an increased understanding regarding genotoxicity and underlying mechanisms is needed for assessing the risk with exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). The aim of this study was to perform an in-depth investigation regarding the genotoxicity of well-characterized Ni and NiO NPs in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells and to discern possible mechanisms. Comparisons were made with NiCl2 in order to elucidate effects of ionic Ni. Methods: BEAS-2B cells were exposed to Ni and NiO NPs, as well as NiCl2, and uptake and cellular dose were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The NPs were characterized in terms of surface composition (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), agglomeration (photon cross correlation spectroscopy) and nickel release in cell medium (ICP-MS). Cell death (necrosis/apoptosis) was investigated by Annexin VFITC/PI staining and genotoxicity by cytokinesis-block micronucleus (cytome) assay (OECD 487), chromosomal aberration (OECD 473) and comet assay. The involvement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium was explored using the fluorescent probes, DCFH-DA and Fluo-4. Results: NPs were efficiently taken up by the BEAS-2B cells. In contrast, no or minor uptake was observed for ionic Ni from NiCl2. Despite differences in uptake, all exposures (NiO, Ni NPs and NiCl2) caused chromosomal damage. Furthermore, NiO NPs were most potent in causing DNA strand breaks and generating intracellular ROS. An increase in intracellular calcium was observed and modulation of intracellular calcium by using inhibitors and chelators clearly prevented the chromosomal damage. Chelation of iron also protected against induced damage, particularly for NiO and NiCl2. Conclusions: This study has revealed chromosomal damage by Ni and NiO NPs as well as Ni ionic species and provides novel evidence for a calcium-dependent mechanism of cyto- and genotoxicity.

  • 2. Gliga, Anda R.
    et al.
    Skoglund, Sara
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Size-dependent cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human lung cells: the role of cellular uptake, agglomeration and Ag release2014In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently one of the most manufactured nanomaterials. A wide range of toxicity studies have been performed on various AgNPs, but these studies report a high variation in toxicity and often lack proper particle characterization. The aim of this study was to investigate size-and coating-dependent toxicity of thoroughly characterized AgNPs following exposure of human lung cells and to explore the mechanisms of toxicity. Methods: BEAS-2B cells were exposed to citrate coated AgNPs of different primary particle sizes (10, 40 and 75 nm) as well as to 10 nm PVP coated and 50 nm uncoated AgNPs. The particle agglomeration in cell medium was investigated by photon cross correlation spectroscopy (PCCS); cell viability by LDH and Alamar Blue assay; ROS induction by DCFH-DA assay; genotoxicity by alkaline comet assay and gamma H(2)AX foci formation; uptake and intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and cellular dose as well as Ag release by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Results: The results showed cytotoxicity only of the 10 nm particles independent of surface coating. In contrast, all AgNPs tested caused an increase in overall DNA damage after 24 h assessed by the comet assay, suggesting independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity and DNA damage. However, there was no gamma H(2)AX foci formation and no increased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reasons for the higher toxicity of the 10 nm particles were explored by investigating particle agglomeration in cell medium, cellular uptake, intracellular localization and Ag release. Despite different agglomeration patterns, there was no evident difference in the uptake or intracellular localization of the citrate and PVP coated AgNPs. However, the 10 nm particles released significantly more Ag compared with all other AgNPs (approx. 24 wt% vs. 4-7 wt%) following 24 h in cell medium. The released fraction in cell medium did not induce any cytotoxicity, thus implying that intracellular Ag release was responsible for the toxicity. Conclusions: This study shows that small AgNPs (10 nm) are cytotoxic for human lung cells and that the toxicity observed is associated with the rate of intracellular Ag release, a 'Trojan horse' effect.

  • 3.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Gustafsson, Johanna
    Unit for Analytical Toxicology, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Insitutet, SE-141 86 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Unit for Analytical Toxicology, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Insitutet, SE-141 86 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Lennart
    Unit for Analytical Toxicology, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Novum, Karolinska Insitutet, SE-141 86 Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and toxicity of commercially relevant iron- and chromium-based particles: in vitro studies with an inhalation perspective2010In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 7, no 23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Production of ferrochromium alloys (FeCr), master alloys for stainless steel manufacture, involves casting and crushing processes where particles inevitably become airborne and potentially inhaled. The aim of this study was to assess potential health hazards induced by inhalation of different well-characterized iron- and chromium-based particles, i.e. ferrochromium (FeCr), ferrosiliconchromium (FeSiCr), stainless steel (316L), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), and chromium(III)oxide (Cr2O3), in different size fractions using in vitro methods. This was done by assessing the extent and speciation of released metals in synthetic biological medium and by analyzing particle reactivity and toxicity towards cultured human lung cells (A549).

    Results

    The amount of released metals normalized to the particle surface area increased with decreasing particle size for all alloy particles, whereas the opposite situation was valid for particles of the pure metals. These effects were evident in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF) of pH 4.5 containing complexing agents, but not in neutral or weakly alkaline biological media. Chromium, iron and nickel were released to very low extent from all alloy particles, and from particles of Cr due to the presence of a Cr(III)-rich protective surface oxide. Released elements were neither proportional to the bulk nor to the surface composition after the investigated 168 hours of exposure. Due to a surface oxide with less protective properties, significantly more iron was released from pure iron particles compared with the alloys. Cr was predominantly released as Cr(III) from all particles investigated and was strongly complexed by organic species of ALF. Cr2O3 particles showed hemolytic activity, but none of the alloy particles did. Fine-sized particles of stainless steel caused however DNA damage, measured with the comet assay after 4 h exposure. None of the particles revealed any significant cytotoxicity in terms of cell death after 24 h exposure.

    Conclusion

    It is evident that particle and alloy characteristics such as particle size and surface composition are important aspects to consider when assessing particle toxicity and metal release from alloy particles compared to pure metal particles. Generated results clearly elucidate that neither the low released concentrations of metals primarily as a result of protective and poorly soluble surface oxides, nor non-bioavailable chromium complexes, nor the particles themselves of occupational relevance induced significant acute toxic response, with exception of DNA damage from stainless steel.

  • 4. Karlsson, Hanna L.
    et al.
    Gliga, Anda R.
    Calleja, Fabienne M. G. R.
    Goncalves, Catia S. A. G.
    Odenevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Vrieling, Harry
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Hendriks, Giel
    Mechanism-based genotoxicity screening of metal oxide nanoparticles using the ToxTracker panel of reporter cell lines2014In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 11, p. 41-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The rapid expansion of manufacturing and use of nano-sized materials fuels the demand for fast and reliable assays to identify their potential hazardous properties and underlying mechanisms. The ToxTracker assay is a recently developed mechanism-based reporter assay based on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells that uses GFP-tagged biomarkers for detection of DNA damage, oxidative stress and general cellular stress upon exposure. Here, we evaluated the ability of the ToxTracker assay to identify the hazardous properties and underlying mechanisms of a panel of metal oxide-and silver nanoparticles (NPs) as well as additional non-metallic materials (diesel, carbon nanotubes and quartz). Methods: The metal oxide-and silver nanoparticles were characterized in terms of agglomeration and ion release in cell medium (using photon cross correlation spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma with optical emission spectroscopy, respectively) as well as acellular ROS production (DCFH-DA assay). Cellular uptake was investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. GFP reporter induction and cytotoxicity of the NPs was simultaneously determined using flow cytometry, and genotoxicity was further tested using conventional assays (comet assay, gamma-H(2)AX and RAD51 foci formation). Results: We show that the reporter cells were able to take up nanoparticles and, furthermore, that exposure to CuO, NiO and ZnO nanoparticles as well as to quartz resulted in activation of the oxidative stress reporter, although only at high cytotoxicity for ZnO. NiO NPs activated additionally a p53-associated cellular stress response, indicating additional reactive properties. Conventional assays for genotoxicity assessment confirmed the response observed in the ToxTracker assay. We show for CuO NPs that the induction of oxidative stress is likely the consequence of released Cu ions whereas the effect by NiO was related to the particles per se. The DNA replication stress-induced reporter, which is most strongly associated with carcinogenicity, was not activated by any of the tested nanoparticles. Conclusions: We conclude that the ToxTracker reporter system can be used as a rapid mechanism-based tool for the identification of hazardous properties of metal oxide NPs. Furthermore, genotoxicity of metal oxide NPs seems to occur mainly via oxidative stress rather than direct DNA binding with subsequent replication stress.

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