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  • 1.
    Häggmark, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Neuroproteomic profiling of human body fluids2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 485-502Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of protein expression and abundance provides a possibility to extend the current knowledge on disease-associated processes and pathways. The human brain is a complex organ and dysfunction or damage can give rise to a variety of neurological diseases. Although many proteins potentially reflecting disease progress are originating from brain, the scarce availability of human tissue material has lead to utilization of body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood in disease-related research. Within the most common neurological disorders, much effort has been spent on studying the role of a few hallmark proteins in disease pathogenesis but despite extensive investigation, the signatures they provide seem insufficient to fully understand and predict disease progress. In order to expand the view the field of neuroproteomics has lately emerged alongside developing technologies, such as affinity proteomics and mass spectrometry, for multiplexed and high-throughput protein profiling. Here, we provide an overview of how such technologies have been applied to study neurological disease and we also discuss some important considerations concerning discovery of disease-associated profiles.

  • 2.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mattsson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Solomon, David
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity proteomics discovers decreased levels of AMFR in plasma from Osteoporosis patients2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 681-690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Affinity proteomic approaches by antibody bead arrays enable multiplexed analysis of proteins in body fluids. In the presented study, we investigated blood plasma within osteoporosis to discovery differential protein profiles and to propose novel biomarkers candidates for subsequent studies. Experimental design: Starting with 4608 antibodies and plasma samples from 22 women for an untargeted screening, a set of 72 proteins were suggested for further analysis. Complementing these with targets from literature and other studies, a targeted bead array of 180 antibodies was built to profile for 92 proteins in plasma samples of 180 women from two independent population-based studies. Results: Differential profiles between osteoporosis patients and matched controls were discovered for 12 proteins in at least one of the two study sets. Among these targets, the levels of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) were concordantly lower in plasma of female osteoporosis patients. Subsequently, verification of anti-AMFR antibody selectivity was conducted using high-density peptide and protein arrays, and Western blotting. Conclusions and clinical relevance: Further validation in additional study sets will be needed to determine the clinical value of the observed decrease in AMFR plasma levels in osteoporosis patients, but AMFR may aid our understanding of disease mechanisms and could support existing tools for diagnosis and monitoring of patient mobility within osteoporosis.

  • 3.
    Remnestål, Julia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Just, David
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mulder, Jan
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kultima, Kim
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Kilander, Lena
    Lannfelt, Lars
    Svenningsson, Per
    Nellgard, Bengt
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Blennow, Kaj
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    CSF profiling of the human brain enriched proteome reveals associations of neuromodulin and neurogranin to Alzheimer's disease2016In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1242-1253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study is part of a larger effort aiming to expand the knowledge of brain-enriched proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and to provide novel insight into the relation between such proteins and different neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental design: Here 280 brain-enriched proteins in CSF from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are profiled. In total, 441 human samples of ventricular CSF collected post mortem and lumbar CSF collected ante mortem are analyzed using 376 antibodies in a suspension bead array setup, utilizing a direct labelling approach. Results: Among several proteins displaying differentiated profiles between sample groups, we focus here on two synaptic proteins, neuromodulin (GAP43) and neurogranin (NRGN). They are both found at elevated levels in CSF from AD patients in two independent cohorts, providing disease-associated profiles in addition to verifying and strengthening previously observed patterns. Increased levels are also observed for patients for whom the AD diagnosis was not established at the time of sampling. Conclusions and clinical relevance: These findings indicate that analyzing the brain-enriched proteins in CSF is of particular interest to increase the understanding of the CSF proteome and its relation to neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, this study lends support to the notion that measurements of these synaptic proteins could potentially be of great relevance in future diagnostic tests for AD.

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