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  • 1. Andersson, Mats
    et al.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Holmgren, Lina
    Non-industrial private forest owners' financial risk taking: Does gender matter?2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 25, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Male and female non-industrial private forest (NIPF) owners differ in inheritance positions, valuations and forest management style. A survey of Swedish NIPF owners found that male and female owners differ in their willingness to take a financial risk. The preliminary analysis, looking only at gender, revealed no difference in the willingness to take risk. Dividing the population according to dependence on income from forestry, however, showed that female NIPF owners increased their willingness to take financial risk when the dependence of income from forestry changed from insubstantial to notable. Females' tolerance towards risk was also significantly higher than males' at the notable level of dependence of forestry income. Having or not having economic yield as one of the most important objectives of ownership seemed to have a little effect on the willingness to take financial risk; however, the results were further strengthened when adding this dimension. A gender perspective was applied to explain identified differences between male and female forest owners concerning their willingness to take financial risks. Whether these differences emanate from real differences in willingness to take risk, or whether they are effects from other differences in male and female forest ownership, is discussed.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Marie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kännaste, Astrid
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Lindström, Anders
    School of Industrial Technology and Management, Dalarna University.
    Hellqvist, Claes
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Stattin, Eva
    School of Industrial Technology and Management, Dalarna University.
    Långström, Bo
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Mini-seedlings of Picea abies are less attacked by Hylobius abietis than conventional ones: Is plant chemistry the explanation?2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 299-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pine weevil, Hylobius abietis (L.), is a major pest in conifer reforestation areas in the Palaearctic region. Size and chemistry of the seedlings may explain the damage rates in plantations. The performance of 10-week containerized seedlings (mini-seedlings) was compared with 1-year-old conventional seedlings of Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.), in a field experiment in central Sweden. After 2 years the weevil damage was lower for the mini-seedlings than for the conventional seedlings (3.5 vs 55%). After 3 years, the overall survival was 82 and 75%, respectively. Weevil damage was the main cause of mortality for conventional seedlings, whereas mini-seedlings mainly died from drought. Volatiles of the two seedling types were compared by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). Unwounded mini-seedlings and conventional seedlings differed in their compositions of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Miniseedlings mainly emitted limonene, known to be repellent to the pine weevil. When wounded, green leaf volatiles were released by mini-seedlings while the pine weevil attractant alpha-pinene was released by conventional seedlings. Volatiles may partly explain the mini-seedlings' resistance against weevil attack. Further studies are needed to clarify how long this miniseedling effect remains.

  • 3.
    Lindström, Tom
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. Innventia AB, Paper Chem & Nanomat Grp, Sweden.
    Aulin, Christian
    Market and technical challenges and opportunities in the area of innovative new materials and composites based on nanocellulosics2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 345-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This communication is a review over the major market and technical challenges and opportunities for nanocellulosic materials on a large scale but in low-to-medium-end markets. Basically, the potential use of nanocellulose as a wet-end strength additive in papermaking has been known for decades, but not come into operation because of the high-energy costs of producing these materials. Cost performance compared to starch derivatives is one challenge, and the other is to design suitable dewatering/retention aid systems. Other paper applications are as a surface-sizing agent and as a barrier coating material. Major challenges are associated with the high viscosity of nanocellulosic materials and how to apply the nanocellulose in order to obtain good surface coverage. There are several opportunities in the nanocomposite markets. The packaging sector together with the automotive sector and the building sector constitute large potential markets. Challenges are related to the mixing of hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials so that a good dispersion of nanocellulose is obtained. Scaling up of nanocellulose production processes and procedures for nanocomposite manufacturing in order to obtain price-performance in the various applications remains, as expected, the largest challenge.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Bengt
    et al.
    SLU.
    Hannrup, Björn
    SkogForsk.
    Jönsson, Marie
    SLU.
    Larsolle, Anders
    SLU.
    Nordström, Maria
    SkogForsk.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Rudolphi, Jörgen
    SLU.
    Strömgren, Maria
    SLU.
    A decision support model for individual tree stump harvesting options based on criteria for economic return and environmental protection2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 32, p. 246-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on principles of multi-criteria analysis techniques, a model (MAPStump-E) for decision support on stump harvesting at stand level was developed. The model applies the concept that each stump can be attributed production values (economic) and environmental values (here soil protection and water quality). Individual tree stump information was incorporated directly from the production reports of harvesters and combined with high-resolution Geographical Information System data on topography and soil type to create a production submodel and a soil and water vulnerability submodel (SWM). To test the model, it was applied to a 45-ha study forest in south-central Sweden and the outcome of nine scenarios with varying bioenergy prices and environmental protection levels was examined. Combined analysis of the effects of production and environmental criteria on total dry mass of harvestable stumps at the study site showed that biomass prices had a stronger influence than environmental criteria. Conflict stumps were defined as stumps suitable for harvest based on production criteria, but unsuitable based on soil and water protection criteria. In a ?medium? price scenario, the proportion of conflict stumps at the study site ranged from 6% to 18%, depending on protection level set.

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