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  • 1.
    Adolphson, Marcus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Kernel densities and mixed functionality in a multicentred urban region2010In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 550-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interurban-level focus during the last decade has shifted from the compact city towards a polycentric urban framework. The ability to define consistent urban structures and also link them with sustainability goals has been hindered by inconsistent evaluation methods for density and mixed functionality in a polycentric framework. The aim of this research is to test and combine various methods from these perspectives in order to define more reliable and consistent descriptions of urban structures. The methods used are spatial-density modelling using kernel convolution, a polycentric density estimation, and methods depicting mixed functionality and the association between density and mixed functionality. The empirical findings relate to planning goals at both national and international level. The study region is the municipality of Strangnas, within the Stockholm City Region since 1997. Results from the analysis reveal urban development towards further segregated land use and sprawl, as well as a decreasing link with a polycentric urban scheme. The methods developed for depicting urban form could be useful tools in the planning process and may reinforce the possibility for analysing links between urban form and sustainability aspects. This improved knowledge in turn could contribute towards formulating future planning principles.

  • 2.
    Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    Snickars, Folke
    Adapting GIS technology to the needs of local planning2000In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 923-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our objective in this paper is to argue for a new use of geographic information systems-GIS in local planning as an auxiliary tool for decisionmaking. We review the use of the GIS technique in earlier research studies and represent the empirical findings from using GIS in a quality-of-life study in conjunction with an urban renewal project of a residential area in Stockholm County, Sweden. Special attention is given to the potential of GIS for mapping qualitative data representing people's needs and judgments about their residential areas. We conclude with a discussion of future challenges in using GIS techniques in combination with the Internet for social analysis in renewal planning. One of the arguments proposed is that the tool can be used to promote the involvement of urban residents.

  • 3.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Day-to-day interpersonal and intrapersonal variability of individuals' activity spaces in a developing country2014In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1063-1076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the SITRAMP dataset, which was collected in the Jakarta metropolitan area, Indonesia, over four consecutive days, this study examines day-to-day variability of individuals' activity spaces. The impact of individual heterogeneity and variability of transport network conditions on day-to-day variability of activity spaces is also investigated. Results show that individuals' activity spaces vary from day to day and between different individuals. The activity space of other household members was found to be the most significant factor influencing an individual's activity space. Against the common belief in developing countries that better traffic conditions make individuals travel farther, results show that higher road-network travel speed and better road surface conditions within the home zones actually encourage individuals to visit a more compact set of activity locations and/or visit fewer activity locations. Smoother road surface conditions and higher travel speeds within home zones also bring the centroid of activity locations closer to individuals' home locations. Furthermore, day-to-day variability analysis of individual activity spaces showed that weekday activity spaces are more compact than those at weekends. Moreover, it was found that students' activity spaces show most variability, while those of nonworkers have the lowest variability.

  • 4.
    Dharmowijoyo, Dimas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    The Day to Day Inter and Intra Personal Variability of Individual's Action Space in Developing CountryIn: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    A hundred nodes in the Stockholm region: a simple calculation of the effects on commuting2002In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide input to a discussion on the potential for reduced commuting with retained accessibility to work, when the development of information technology sets new conditions, and provides new opportunities, for the location of workplaces. The potential impacts on commuting of a node-structured Stockholm region is calculated. The result of the calculation is presented as a comparison between the node-structured city and a reference scenario for the year 2010. The reference scenario has been designed by the planning authorities in the region. The calculation started with the selection of a number of nodes. The exact number of nodes was not defined in advance. Rather it was a result of requirements for reasonable public transport and on reasonable population densities. This resulted in approximately 100 nodes. These were then treated as attractors of workplaces in the calculation. Some of the commuting trips in the reference scenario were rerouted according to specified assumptions. One assumption was that the desire to cut a trip would increase with distance. Another was that the desire to start working in a node would increase with decreasing distance to the node. A third assumption was that the propensity to work from home would increase with the distance to the workplace in the reference scenario. The calculation resulted in a scenario with considerably shorter commuting trips, with a consequent reduction in commuting volumes, and a subsequent increase in walking and cycling, compared with the reference scenario.

  • 6. Höjer, Mattias
    A hundred nodes in the Stockhom region – a simple calculation of the effects on commuting2002In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 197-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to provide input to a discussion on the potential for reduced commuting with retained accessibility to work, when the development of information technology sets new conditions, and provides new opportunities, for the location of workplaces. The potential impacts on commuting of a node-structured Stockholm region is calculated. The result of the calculation is presented as a comparison between the node-structured city and a reference scenario for the year 2010. The reference scenario has been designed by the planning authorities in the region. The calculation started with the selection of a number of nodes. The exact number of nodes was not defined in advance. Rather it was a result of requirements for reasonable public transport and on reasonable population densities. This resulted in approximately 100 nodes. These were then treated as attractors of workplaces in the calculation. Some of the commuting trips in the reference scenario were rerouted according to specified assumptions. One assumption was that the desire to cut a trip would increase with distance. Another was that the desire to start working in a node would increase with decreasing distance to the node. A third assumption was that the propensity to work from home would increase with the distance to the workplace in the reference scenario. The calculation resulted in a scenario with considerably shorter commuting trips, with a consequent reduction in commuting volumes, and a subsequent increase in walking and cycling, compared with the reference scenario.

  • 7.
    Jonsson, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Fadaei, Masoud
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Olsson, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Reconciling user benefit and time-geography-based individual accessibility measures2014In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1031-1043Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a dynamic discrete choice model of activity scheduling that features classic time-geography properties within a microeconomic framework. We present results that show how the model can produce accessibilities that form space-time prisms, while retaining the properties of traditional measures based on consumer surplus in the form of logsums. The main features of the model are that it handles time-space constraints, travel time uncertainty, and endogenous trip chaining in one consistent framework. The resulting accessibility respects the individual's time budget and fixed activities. The dynamic discrete choice framework makes possible estimation of behavioural parameters using well-known methods. Some of the remaining computational challenges are discussed. The final section provides some examples of the policy analysis possibilities provided by a model of this kind.

  • 8. Kickert, Conrad Christiaan
    et al.
    Berghauser Pont, Meta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Urban Design.
    Nefs, Merten
    Surveying density, urban characteristics, and development capacity of station areas in the Delta Metropolis2014In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 69-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of growing mobility needs and dwindling transportation budgets in the Dutch Delta Metropolis has raised the need for smarter use of existing public transport infrastructure. A significant portion of this smarter use may come from strengthening the ties between infrastructure improvements and transit-oriented development. To further this goal, the Delta Metropolis Association has developed SprintCity (SprintStad in Dutch), a serious game and planning support tool that engages stakeholders in transit-oriented development to explore interaction between transport and land use, as described in Bertolini's node-place model. However, its underlying database has proven insufficient to draw conclusions regarding urban character and development capacity around stations. This paper focuses on morphological research that aims to improve this database by exploring the density and urban morphology of station areas in the Delta Metropolis beyond readily available statistics, and discusses the methodological and theoretical underpinnings of this survey. The surveying of station areas in 2010 was conducted by a team of six researchers, based on the Spacemate (c) methodology developed by Berghauser Pont and Haupt. The methodology allows detailed quantitative measurement of the density and spatial characteristics of clearly demarcated urban districts, defining their so-called 'spatial fingerprint'. The resulting database of 850 districts in 55 station areas has served descriptive goals, strengthening the realism in the SprintCity game, and serves as the database for further establishing the development potential of station areas.

  • 9.
    Shirabe, Takeshi
    Department of Geoinformation and Cartography, Vienna University of Technology.
    Districting Modeling with Exact Contiguity Constraints2009In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1053-1066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A classic problem in planning is districting, which aims to partition a given area into a specified number of subareas according to required criteria. Size, compactness, and contiguity are among the most frequently used districting criteria. While size and compactness may be interpreted differently in different contexts, contiguity is an unambiguous topological property. A district is said to be contiguous if all locations in it are ‘connected’—that is, one can travel between any two locations in the district without leaving it. This paper introduces a new integer-programming-based approach to districting modeling, which enforced contiguity constraints independently of any other criteria that might be additionally imposed. Three experimental models are presented, and tested with sample data on the forty-eight conterminous US states. A major implication of this paper is that the exact formulation of a contiguity requirement allows planners to address diverse sets of districting criteria.

  • 10.
    Ståhle, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Transport and Location Analysis (closed 20110301).
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Place Syntax: geographic accessibility with visibility in GIS2009In: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ståhle, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Marcus, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Koch, Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Place syntax: Geographic attraction-accessibility analysis with axial linesIn: Environment and Planning, B: Planning and Design, ISSN 0265-8135, E-ISSN 1472-3417Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
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