Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Allen, J.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Cars, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Multiculturalism and governing neighbourhoods2001In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 2195-2209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parekh's theory of multiculturalism offers a number of insights which are useful in analysing the role of neighbourhood governance in promoting social cohesion within culturally diverse small areas. The problems of neighbourhood governance are rooted in disjointed structural change across Europe over the past 25 years. In this context, the formation of a multicultural European polity risks creating a white European ethnicity which will institutionalise specific forms of racism within distressed neighbourhoods. At the same time, the shift from government to governance as a way to address the problems of governability in structurally reconstituted societies is associated with the top-down imposition of specific forms of neighbourhood governance which can then, unwittingly, become part of the institutionalisation of racism. Using Parekh's theory to construct a critique yields a set of principles which illuminate a number of key strategic elements which can be used practically in designing neighbourhood governance mechanisms and which illuminate the pre-occupations in the existing literature.

  • 2. Barthel, S.
    et al.
    Parker, J.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    ckholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University; African Centre for Cities, University of Cape Town.
    Food and Green Space in Cities: A Resilience Lens on Gardens and Urban Environmental Movements2015In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 1321-1338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the role played by urban gardens during historical collapses in urban food supply lines and identifies the social processes required to protect two crit- ical elements of urban food production during times of crisis—open green spaces and the collective memory of how to grow food. Advanced communication and transport technologies allow food sequestration from the farthest reaches of the planet, but have markedly increasing urban dependence on global food systems over the past 50 years. Simultaneously, such advances have eroded collective memory of food production, while suitable spaces for urban gardening have been lost. These factors combine to heighten the potential for food shortages when—as occurred in the 20th century— major economic, political or environmental crises sever supply lines to urban areas. This paper considers how to govern urban areas sustainably in order to ensure food security in times of crisis by: evincing the effectiveness of urban gardening during crises; showing how allotment gardens serve as conduits for transmitting collective social-ecological memories of food production; and, discussing roles and strategies of urban environmental movements for protecting urban green space. Urban gardening and urban social movements can build local ecological and social response capacity against major collapses in urban food supplies. Hence, they should be incorporated as central elements of sustainable urban development. Urban governance for resilience should be historically informed about major food crises and allow for redundant food production solutions as a response to uncertain futures.

  • 3.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Crime in a City in Transition: The Case of Tallinn, Estonia2009In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 1611-1638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to characterise the criminogenic conditions of an eastern European city experiencing the transition from a planned to a market-oriented economy. Tallinn, the capital of Estonia, has been chosen as the case study. The article first describes the various levels of a set of expressive and acquisitive offences in Tallinn and then assesses whether patterns of crime in Tallinn are caused by underlying processes similar to the ones indicated in the Western literature of urban criminology. The study identifies variables that most significantly contribute to the variation of crime ratios using regression models, GIS and spatial statistical techniques. Findings suggest that, although there is no dramatic difference between the geography of crimes in Tallinn and those found in western European and North American cities, some of the explanatory variables function in ways which would not be predicted by Western literature.

  • 4. Ceccato, Vania
    et al.
    Haining, R.
    Assessing the geography of vandalism: Evidence from a Swedish city2005In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 42, no 9, p. 1637-1656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the occurrence of vandalism at the small-area level for the Swedish city of Malmo using data from the Skane Police Authority's database. Demographic, socioeconomic and land use characteristics measured at the small-area level are used as predictors of vandalism with particular interest in the role of collective resources. Standardised vandalism ratios were calculated and mapped using a geographical information system (GIS). Spatial regression models were used to test hypotheses relating to the variation in vandalism rates. Findings show that spatial variation in vandalism is significantly related to social disorganisation risk factors as well as land use factors, but that the physical presence of local leisure associations (a 'collective resource') produces higher vandalism rates.

  • 5.
    Hårsman, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Ethnic Diversity and Spatial Segregation in the Stockholm Region2006In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1341-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the development of ethnic segregation and ethnic diversity in the Stockholm region from 1991 to 2001, a period characterised by a rapid increase in the population share with foreign background and in ethnic variety. The population is cross-classified into 13 ethnic groups, 16 age and income groups and 240 planning districts and various entropy measures are used to quantify the ethnic diversity and residential segregation by ethnicity. Light is also shed upon the ethnic segregation process by means of the 'shift-and-share' technique. In the discussion, the quantitative results are related to important policy changes that have taken place since the 1970s. The cementation of ethnic diversity in some planning districts and the increasing overall segregation in the region contrast sharply with the longstanding political rhetoric concerning the importance of fighting segregation and fostering spatial diversity. It is perhaps even more worrying that some of the policy measures imbedded in the Swedish model of social welfare might have contributed to this development.

  • 6.
    Lawhon, Mary
    et al.
    University of Oklahoma.
    Nilsson, David
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Silver, Jonathan
    Sheffield University.
    Ernstson, Henrik
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Lwasa, Shuaib
    Makerere University.
    Thinking through Heterogeneous Infrastructure Configurations2018In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 720-732Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of infrastructure have demonstrated broad differences between Northern and Southern cities, and deconstructed urban theory derived from experiences of the networked urban regions of the global North. This includes critiques of the universalization of the historically-culturally produced normative ideal of universal, uniform infrastructure. We introduce the notion of “heterogeneous infrastructure configurations” (HICs) as a way to analyze urban infrastructure that builds on postcolonial critiques of knowledge, as well as ethnographies of everyday Southern urbanisms. We argue that the notion of HIC helps us to move beyond technological and performative accounts of actually existing infrastructures to provide an analytical lens through which to compare different configurations. Our approach enables a clearer analysis of infrastructural artifacts not as individual objects but as parts of geographically spread socio-technological configurations: configurations which might involve many different kinds technologies, relations, capacities and operations, entailing different risks and power relationships. We use examples from ongoing research on sanitation and waste in Kampala, Uganda- a city in which service delivery is characterized by multiplicity, overlap, disruption and inequality- to demonstrate the kinds of research questions that emerge when thinking through the notion of HICs.

  • 7.
    Metzger, Jonathan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wiberg, Sofia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Contested framings of urban qualities: Dis/qualifications of value in urban development controversies2018In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 55, no 10, p. 2300-2316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What makes a place what it is? What makes it valuable? Questions of this type inevitably relate to practices that articulate urban qualities. This paper investigates the processes and practices through which urban qualities are dis/qualified in urban development processes. Such practices frequently tend to focus on particular urban areas and their development, where some concrete and specific situated value is sensed to be at stake, and therefore often come to play out as struggles over the definition of the supposed ‘essence’ of a particular place, and with this, its qualities and value. The paper brings together the literatures of valuation studies and discussions of framing practices in relation to urban development. Drawing upon these theoretical groundings it conceptualises the dis/qualification of urban qualities as a form of ontological politics which articulates value by way of framing practices. Through the analysis of an empirical case drawn from a Swedish context it is argued that although values and qualities can be negotiated, it is nonetheless always highly uncertain to which degree value-negotiations will hold steady further downstream in the urban development process.

  • 8.
    Tunström, Moa
    Örebro universitet, Akademin för humaniora, utbildning och samhällsvetenskap.
    Jigsaw Cities: Big Places, Small Spaces [by Anne Power and John Houghton]2009In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 2009-2011Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Vranic, Petar
    et al.
    Nis University.
    Vasilevska, Ljiljana
    Nis University.
    Haas, Tigran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Hybrid spatialities: Multi-storey extensions of socialist blocks of flats under post-socialist transition in Serbia, the case of Nis2015In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1261-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research is to study the emergence and evolution of the multi-storey extension (MSE) of socialist blocks of flats in the form of additional storeys or lofts on top of host buildings, which is seen as a dominant model of post-socialist spatial change in inherited multi-storey housing areas in Serbia. Relying on an analysis of empirical data sources, interviews, observation and a comparative analysis, the paper investigates the MSE as a predominantly self-organising process. It also considers its manifestations at different operational and spatial levels in the study area of the city of Nis. It is argued that the MSE, under conditions of low economic capacity, an indifferent attitude of local authorities, an inconsistent legislative environment, and the market as an essential driving force of the process, results in uneven urban transformations, both in physical and social terms.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf