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  • 1.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Moberg, Åsa
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nors, Minna
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Hohenthal, Catharina
    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland.
    Media content provided on different platforms –Environmental performance of online and printed versions of Alma Medianewspapers.2014In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 7-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Kamal Alm, Hajer
    et al.
    Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Ström, Göran
    Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Schoelkopf, Joachim
    Omya AG.
    Ridgway, Cathy
    Gane, Patrick
    Omya AG.
    Ink adhesion failure during full scale offset printing: causes and impact on print quality2015In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 257-278Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Arushanyan, Yevgeniya
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Local Television Content Production: Process Structures and Climate Impacts – a Case Study2012In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 215-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The business environment in which media companies exist today is rapidly changing. If they have not done so already, media companies need to position themselves to this ongoing change and find their place in the new media landscape. However, this could also mean a good opportunity to optimize work processes on different levels. In order to meet these opportunities, as well as being proactive when it comes to environmental performance, we first need to understand the current structure of media companies, for example when it comes to work processes.

    The aim of this study is to identify and analyze the process structure and the potential climate impact of the content production of the local television station TV4 Gävle/Dalarna in Sweden. The study objectives are:

    • to identify the major editorial and marketing processes and to visualize the two workflows in order to discover how the processes could be optimized and how this in turn may affect the environmental impact.
    • to assess the carbon footprint of the content production of the local television station and to identify the major reasons for this climate change impact.

    Two main methods were used – semi-structured interviews and carbon footprint assessment.

    The editorial part of the workflow is centered on broadcasting news at certain times. A total of nine process steps were identified in the editorial workflow. The largest amount of person hours can be found in the process steps of content production and content editing. Work is done in order to meet the deadlines which come every time there is a broadcast. This fact puts special demands on the personnel, such as an ability to manage stress and short deadlines, and an ability to handle the technical equipment in one-person teams. There is a total of seven process steps on the marketing side, two of which are located outside of the local television station.

    A large part of the carbon footprint from the TV4 Gävle/Dalarna content production is caused by business trips by car. The editorial department makes most of the business trips, but the marketing department is also responsible for some of the trips. The total carbon footprint from the television production is estimated to 52 tons of CO2 eq/year, including the employees’ trips to andfrom the workplace. The trips to and from work is the second largest contributor to the carbon footprint. When considering the impact per viewer, the result is 0.35 kg of CO2 eq/viewer and year.

    Judging from today’s situation, the efficiency on the editorial side is very good. However, it might still be fruitful to consider the travelling practices in order to improve the overall environmental performance.

  • 4.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Explorative scenarios of emerging media trends2014In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with the on-going structural changes in the media landscape is one of the most urgent challenges in today's society, both for people working in the media industry and for consumers trying to adapt to a large and increasing number of new media technologies and services. In this article, we present and discuss a number of current media trends, outline possible future scenarios and evaluate and discuss these scenarios in terms of future media consumption, mainly focusing on the Nordic media market. The research questions are: What are the main media consumption trends today, and what could be the most important characteristics of media consumption in different future scenarios? We have used a combination of a future studies approach, semi-structured expert interviews and design fiction methodology. We have organized two reference group workshops and then interviewed 11 media experts, both from the media industry and the academic world, and combined the results of these interviews and workshops with the significant media trends generated through design fiction methodology in the project course "The Future of Media" at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

    One of the conclusions drawn is that the mobile phone (smartphone) and other mobile devices such as tablets, etc., are playing an increasingly important role in current media consumption trends. We can see this through an increased number of mobile devices, an increased use of multiple devices (often used simultaneously) and in the fact that users tend to be "always connected and always synchronized". Another conclusion drawn is that there is an increased focus on personalized and individualized news with more co-creation and sharing of media content. The amount of non-text formats for news, e.g., video, is increasing, as well as the need for a high-speed, high-quality infrastructure/network. The news consumers are increasingly time-pressed, and commute more, which creates new and different demands on the media content, such as being easily accessible at all times and places. Finally, more data is collected by media companies about the consumption habits of media users and more surveillance is performed on citizens by governments and corporations. When interviewed about the scenarios and trends in this study, the experts considered the most desirable future society to have a balanced mix of governmental control and commercial powers. As an example, public service media was considered an important counterbalance to commercially oriented media companies. According to the experts that were interviewed, aspects of all four proposed scenarios could however become true in the future, depending on choices made both on an individual level and on a societal level.

  • 5.
    Rehberger, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Glasenapp, Astrid Odeberg
    Xiaofan, Zhang
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    VDP Quality aspects on fibre based packaging: An elementary print quality study on corrugated boardIn: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Variable data printing (VDP) is a technique whereby certain information can be altered in an otherwise static layout with the help of a digital printing system, and in the packaging industry a wide range of applications are possible. Inkjet printing, due to its non-impact printing (NIP) principle, is the most suitable technique to be implemented in packaging production (van Daele, 2005). Only when printing high volumes is inkjet printing much more expensive than conventional printing (Viström, et al., 2006). However, the advantages of inkjet printing could still be adopted by another approach.

    At Innventia AB, the “HybSpeed Printing” project was initiated to study the combination of a conventional printing process with inkjet printing. The aim of the project is to assess the practicability of attaining high quality VDP at high speed on a variety of packaging papers for corrugated board production. The exploratory trials were conducted on a Kodak Versamark DP5240 in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden, in cooperation with the Mid-Sweden University - Digital Printing Centre (DPC). Nine different substrates, white top and pure white liner, single-coated, double-coated, kraftliner and testliner were printed at a speed of 2 m/s.

    Rehberger et al. (2010) described in the first part of the study that high-speed inkjet printing at 5 m/s has only an insignificant influence on the print quality. In this article, the influence of paper properties is discussed and it is shown that the paper quality has a considerable influence on the print quality. All paper qualities led to an acceptable print result at a medium print resolution. Speed is the most important factor for inline implementation of inkjet, but the tests revealed that the paper properties are most decisive for good print quality.

  • 6.
    Teljas, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interactive and social - A study of Swedish online newspapers2013In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, no 2-13, p. 63-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how established media services such as online newspapers meet the increasing popularity of social media. A case study of Aftonbladet.se was conducted in order to understand how one of the leading Swedish online newspapers uses social media and relates to this new media form. The most important evidence of the influence of social media on Aftonbladet is apparent in the way its role as an online newspaper is expressed: "Aftonbladet wants to be a meeting place (……). The whole experience builds on interactivity and community". The case study results of Aftonbladet's social media use are interesting because they offer indications of Sweden's leading online newspaper's take on new media developmentand more specifically of the reasoning within the newspaper organization around the changing user relations.

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