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  • 1.
    Al-Karawi, Hassan
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Leander, John
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    Al-Emrani, Mohammad
    Architecture and Civil Engineering Department, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Verification of the Maximum Stresses in Enhanced Welded Details via High-Frequency Mechanical Impact in Road Bridges2023In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 364-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-frequency mechanical impact (HFMI) is an efficient post-weld treatment technique  that enhances fatigue strength in metallic welded structures. Steel or steel-concrete  composite road bridges, where the fatigue limit state often governs the design, compose one category of structures that can benefit from the application of this technology. To assert an improvement in fatigue strength using HFMI, the induced compressive residual stresses must be stable. Therefore, the maximum service stresses that can be allowed on HFMI-treated joints should be controlled to avoid the relaxation of the induced beneficial compressive stresses by HFMI treatment. Using statistical analysis of recorded traffic, this paper compares the measured maximum traffic loads to those generated by a load model. More than 870,000 and 470,000 recorded vehicles from traffic measurements in Sweden and the Netherlands are used in this analysis. To capture the characteristic bending moment, the daily maxima of the resulting measured load effect are combined with the extreme value distribution of the bending moment. In addition, it is found that the characteristic load combination is the best-studied option to assess the maximum stress in HFMI-treated weldments in road bridges.

  • 2.
    Angelaki, Stavroula
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Lighting Design.
    Triantafyllidis, Georgios A.
    Lighting Design Lab, Aalborg University, 2450 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Light as a Form of Visual Language Supporting Daily Schedules in Educational Spaces: A Design Framework2024In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 1385-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how lighting can be employed as a visual language to enhance communication between the space and its users and develop a design framework for educational spaces. A primary school is used as a case study to apply the proposed design framework. The study focuses on lighting interventions in existing educational spaces to support daily schedules and transitions between activities. In this context, electric light is used as an indicator, highlighting the daily schedule and activities in the space. A theoretical approach is used as a foundation for establishing the design framework that leads to lighting proposals based on the specific spatial characteristics of each study. The outcome is a design solution based on the dominant spatial elements that define the space’s identity and function. The study focuses on educational spaces and lighting for peripheral vision while considering pupils’ visual and spatial development. The proposal has the role of an additional light layer that signals transitions in terms of activities or spatial mobility.

  • 3.
    Brismark, Johanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Plant An Idea AB.
    Malmqvist, Tove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Borgström, Sara
    WSP Sweden.
    Climate Mitigation in the Swedish Single-Family Homes Industry and Potentials for LCA as Decision Support2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 588-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision support tools for incentivizing environmentally sound decisions in building design,such as LCA (life cycle assessment), have been highlighted as an essential feature for enhancingthe realization of more sustainable buildings. Nevertheless, the use of LCA to support decisions inbuilding design is still limited in practice. A better understanding of the social dynamics and detailedcontexts of the decisions leading up to a final building design is therefore critical for better integrationof LCA-based information in the decision-making processes. This paper reports a qualitative, semistructuredinterview study of single-family home producers in Sweden and their decision-making inrelation to climate mitigation, with a particular focus on embodied carbon mitigation. By studying aspecific branch of the building and construction sector, a more in-depth record can be obtained of theparticularities of implementation contexts and decision-making situations in which LCA may, or maynot, have a role in driving climate mitigation. Four primary decision contexts in which LCA mayhave an influential role to drive embodied carbon reduction include: (1) the development of buildingsystems, (2) development and offering of house models, (3) the selection of construction products forthe building system as well as for the offer of add-on products to customers, and (4) the dialoguesin the individual house-buyer projects. Decision-making that affects sustainable outcomes in thispart of the sector is very much dependent on a supporting regulatory context. Over the years, usingbuilding LCA in early design stages, for optimization towards low-impact final buildings, has been arepeatedly promoted recommendation both in academia and practice. This study, however, revealsthat such a conclusion is too simplistic. The different overarching decision contexts identified for thisparticular branch display the variety of needs for life cycle-based information.

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  • 4.
    Bäcklund, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Molinari, Marco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Lundqvist, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    In Search for Untapped Energy-Saving Potential in Green and Smart Higher Educational Buildings—An Empirical Case Study Involving the Building Occupants2023In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 13, no 12, article id 3103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy-intense activities and the unpredictable and complex behavior of building occupants lead to an increase in building energy demand. It is, therefore, crucial to study underlying factors for building energy demand related to the users. Higher educational buildings are relevant to study for several reasons: they host the future workforce and citizens, they are predicted to increase in numbers, and they represent a building type less studied. Furthermore, green-rated buildings equipped with smart building systems also represent a research gap that is relevant to address since such a building design involves IoT-functionalities and digital features for the building occupants to interact with. There is also a conceivable risk that if the users know that the building is green-rated and technologically advanced, this may alter their perception of the building operation and thus their behavior. To study the relationship between building occupants and such green and smart educational structure, a survey was conducted in a Swedish higher educational building; as a result, 300 responses were collected and analyzed. The responses revealed that the building occupants act with energy awareness, and they are conscious about energy-saving behaviors. One building feature in particular was studied: the Digital Room Panels (DRPs). The DRP allows the building occupants to modify the indoor temperature and is, therefore, essential for thermal comfort. One key finding from the survey revealed that 70% of the building occupants did not know how the DRPs operate. This study argues that this result can be explained with a lack of communication and user friendliness. Inadequate interactions with building systems could also result in opportunities for energy saving might not be realized. The findings of this case study led to valuable recommendations and suggestions for future research endeavors.

  • 5.
    Engerstam, Sviatlana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Warsame, Abukar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Long-Term Dynamics of New Residential Supply: A Case Study of the Apartment Segment in Sweden2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 970-, article id 970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the size of the homeownership ratio differs significantly between countries, it is important to understand the mechanisms that lie behind the decrease or growth of certain sectors of the housing market such as rentals and housing cooperatives. The aim of this study is to analyze the long-term dynamics of the new residential supply in Sweden's three largest cities for the period of 1990-2020 and estimate in what way market fundamentals affect it through new construction and housing conversions. We apply panel data methodology and, in distinction to previous research, consider the development of the housing market (urban growth) as physical volume. The results demonstrate that structural changes are driven mainly by fundamental demand factors and that the displacement effect occurs primarily in the market's rental sector and not in the owner-occupied segment. The apartment price per square meter, together with mortgage interest rates, are the major driving factors in the process of converting dwellings into housing cooperatives. Fundamental variables that affect new construction in both the rental and housing cooperative sectors are population and income growth. In the presence of a rent control environment, the rent or price level does not contribute to adding new units to the total housing stock.

  • 6.
    Fonsati, Arianna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Sustainable Buildings.
    Cosentini, Renato Maria
    Department of Structural, Geotechnical and Building Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, 10129 Turin, Italy.
    Tundo, Chiara
    Department of Structural, Geotechnical and Building Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, 10129 Turin, Italy.
    Osello, Anna
    Department of Structural, Geotechnical and Building Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin, 10129 Turin, Italy.
    From Geotechnical Data to GeoBIM Models: Testing Strategies for an Ex-Industrial Site in Turin2023In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 13, no 9, article id 2343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years, the use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) methods has changed the workflows of various actors, providing better integration across different domains and allowing for new ways of working. This paper outlines the interest towards the integration of BIM with geotechnical/geological modelling (GeoBIM), which still represents a major challenge in several respects. The present study aims to provide a flexible method for assessing various integration strategies and to establish a preferred workflow based on the selected requirements and preference parameters. This integration is designed to provide a final federated model that can also be archived in the as-built documentation. Four alternative processes were selected to analyse the specific types of data and transformations required in the process. Each process was applied on a real case study in order to test the developed assessment framework using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP). Due to technological advances, modelling and integration workflows change rapidly; however, our results show that the proposed evaluation framework is universal and adaptable to any new integration approach. Further research efforts must be undertaken to reduce attribute data losses and enhance the interoperability between systems and professionals.

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  • 7.
    Ismail, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Warsame, Abukar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    An Exploratory Analysis of Housing and the Distribution of COVID-19 in Sweden2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 71-, article id 71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of COVID-19 on various aspects of our life is evident. Proximity and close contact with individuals infected with the virus, and the extent of such contact, contribute to the intensity of the spread of the virus. Healthy and infected household members who both require sanctuary and quarantine space come into close and extended contact in housing. In other words, housing and living conditions can impact the health of occupants and the spread of COVID-19. This study investigates the relationship between housing characteristics and variations in the spread of COVID-19 per capita across Sweden's 290 municipalities. For this purpose, we have used the number of infected COVID-19 cases per capita during the pandemic period-February 2020 through April 2021-per municipality. The focus is on variables that measure housing and housing conditions in the municipalities. We use exploratory analysis and Principal Components Analysis to reduce highly correlated variables into a set of linearly uncorrelated variables. We then use the generated variables to estimate direct and indirect effects in a spatial regression analysis. The results indicate that housing and housing availability are important explanatory factors for the geographical spread of COVID-19. Overcrowding, availability, and quality are all critical explanatory factors.

  • 8.
    Ismail, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Warsame, Abukar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Schools' Capitalization into Housing Values in a Context of Free School Choices2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 1021-, article id 1021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of schools and their capitalization in property values has been analyzed extensively. Our contribution is to analyze this effect in an alternative institutional context. In this case study, we analyzed the housing market in Stockholm, Sweden. What distinguishes the Swedish school system is that we have a free choice of schools, which means that a family does not necessarily have to live in a school district to access the schools in that area. This means that families do not have to move to the district to which they intend to send their children but can apply to send them there regardless of whether they live there or not. Nevertheless, families might be interested in living close to good schools to be within walking distance of these schools. This is especially true at the primary school level. Therefore, we analyzed schools' capitalization in property values in the context of free school choice. We used data on transaction prices for condominiums in Stockholm's inner city. The results indicate a capitalization of living close to good schools, but this capitalization is limited. We can show that schools' capitalization depends partly on the quality of the schools and partly on whether or not they are co-located with other externalities, such as green areas. The results also indicate that capitalization is affected by income differences within the city.

  • 9.
    Jaervenpaeae, Anna-Therese
    et al.
    Luleå Univ Technol, Dept Civil Environm & Nat Resources Engn, S-97187 Luleå, Sweden..
    Pavlik, Anthony
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Contextual Communicative Competence in Multinational Infrastructure Projects (vol 11, 403, 2021)2021In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 11, no 12, article id 652Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Järvenpää, Anna-Therése
    et al.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Construction and Facilities Management.
    Contextual Communicative Competence in Multinational Infrastructure Projects2021In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 11, no 9, p. 403-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communication is dynamic, social, challenging, and a key quality factor for construction projects. This is especially the case in multinational and inter-organizational infrastructure projects where factors like culture and language differ among the involved actors. As infrastructure projects usually extend over longer periods of time, collaborative relationships need to be established in which the actors can develop, for example, mutual understanding, learning, and efficient working routines. By building on empirical data from contemporary infrastructure projects, we explore how international contractors and a large public client communicate in multinational infrastructure projects (i.e., what the challenges are and what competences are needed). The analysis is based on the linguistic framework of communicative competence, and we contribute to the development of collaborative models in construction project management by suggesting the concept of contextual communicative competence. View Full-Text

  • 11.
    Malakhatka, Elena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Al Rahis, Anas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Osman, Osman
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Lundqvist, Per
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Monitoring and Predicting Occupant's Sleep Quality by Using Wearable Device OURA Ring and Smart Building Sensors Data (Living Laboratory Case Study)2021In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's commercially-off-the-shelf (COST) wearable devices can unobtrusively capture several important parameters that may be used to measure the indoor comfort of building occupants, including ambient air temperature, relative humidity, skin temperature, perspiration rate, and heart rate. These data could be used not only for improving personal wellbeing, but for adjusting a better indoor environment condition. In this study, we have focused specifically on the sleeping phase. The main purpose of this work was to use the data from wearable devices and smart meters to improve the sleep quality of residents living at KTH Live-in-Lab. The wearable device we used was the OURA ring which specializes in sleep monitoring. In general, the data quality showed good potential for the modelling phase. For the modelling phase, we had to make some choices, such as the programming language and the AI algorithm, that was the best fit for our project. First, it aims to make personal physiological data related studies more transparent. Secondly, the tenants will have a better sleep quality in their everyday life if they have an accurate prediction of the sleeping scores and ability to adjust the built environment. Additionally, using knowledge about end users can help the building owners to design better building systems and services related to the end-user's wellbeing.

  • 12.
    Mehaffy, Michael W.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    The Impacts of Symmetry in Architecture and Urbanism: Toward a New Research Agenda2020In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Architecture has an ancient relationship to mathematics, and symmetry-in the broad sense of the term-is a core topic of both. Yet the contemporary application of theories of symmetry to architecture and built environments is a surprisingly immature area of research. At the same time, research is showing a divergence between the benefits of and preferences for natural environments on the one hand, and built environments on the other, demonstrating relatively deleterious effects of many contemporary built environments. Yet the research cannot yet pinpoint the actual geometric factors of architecture and urbanism that could produce such an important divergence. This paper explores this research gap, surveying the literature across a range of fields, and assessing current evidence for the impacts of symmetry in the built environment upon human perception and well-being. As an emerging case study, it considers the recent work by Christopher Alexander and Nikos Salingaros, two trained mathematicians who have made notable contributions to architecture and urbanism. The conclusion proposes a new research agenda toward further development of this immature subject area.

  • 13.
    Schönbeck, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Löfsjögård, Malin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    A Decision Support System for Hospital Configurations in Construction Projects2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 10, p. 1-15, article id 1569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hospitals are complex buildings and their functionality is essential for patient healthcare. Definition, verification and implementation of accurate configuration information during construction projects are therefore essential. The purpose of this study was to develop a decision support systemby establishing a value chain of configuration information with an end-to-end perspective. The approach of this study was explorative, investigating how building data can support construction projects in making hospital configuration decisions. A literature review provided a knowledge base about the configuration decision process flow, which determined the prerequisites for the proposed data and model management. Exchange and relationships of required building data were ensured by using Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) and a database model, respectively. The results show that using building model data for configuration decision support is feasible. A case study compared data exchanged in three construction projects of Magnetic Resonance Imaging rooms to those identified in the decision support system. Operational gaps regarding data exchange in the studied cases indicate what changes are required in current data collection and management. The contribution of this study is filling a research gap regarding end-to-end information management to support hospitalconfiguration decisions in construction projects.

  • 14.
    Schönbeck, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Löfsjögård, Malin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Ansell, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Quantitative Review of Construction 4.0 Technology Presence in Construction Project Research2020In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 10, no 10, article id 173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of technologies associated with the fourth industrial revolution is rapid. Construction 4.0 represents the architecture, engineering, construction and operations industries exploration of new technologies, equivalent to Industry 4.0 for the manufacturing industry. These concepts address multiple perspectives besides the technological, such as management and processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent research regarding construction projects addresses information and communication, automatisation or industrialisation technologies. A scoping review was the method used to perform a quantitative analysis of over two thousand journal papers published from 2015 onwards. The results show that new technologies are addressed separately, while synergy studies are uncommon. Longitudinal analyses show that there was no significant increase in journal papers concerning new technologies from 2015 to 2019. Information and communication was the search criterion with the least number of papers found. The environmental perspective of new technologies was present but the least common from 2019 to 2020. Hence, this review shows that there is an extensive research gap regarding Construction 4.0 technologies in the context of construction projects. Studies regarding synergy and environmental effects of new technologies should increase to start the progress towards a successful entry into the fourth industrial revolution.

  • 15.
    Song, Zisheng
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    The Capitalization of School Quality in Rents in the Beijing Housing Market: A Propensity Score Matching Method2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 485-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In China, the capitalization of education resources in housing prices has been widely discussed. However, insufficient attention is paid to it in rents. Thus, this paper mainly aims to identify the capitalization of school quality in rents. It estimates a hedonic treatment effects model by introducing the propensity score matching (PSM) method. The empirical analysis is based on 49,438 rental transaction data of 2016–2018 in Beijing, China. It finds that school quality can be significantly capitalized in rents across different school quality (ranked as 1st-class, 2nd-class, and popular-class), space, and time. Besides, quality school density (the number of quality schools) within neighborhoods can significantly moderate the nearest school’s capitalization, promoting a 3.5% capitalization increase in outer municipal districts but a 3% decrease in inner districts. The popular-class schools can be capitalized into the rent of inner districts, probably because of other exogenous factors (e.g., housing prices, public transit). In addition, the equitable housing policy might show a potential risk in worsening social inequality between homeowners and renters in the municipal areas with high competition for 1st-class schools. In contrast, it may remedy such inequality in outer districts with less competition for quality schools.

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  • 16.
    Wallhagen, Marita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Högskolan i Gävle, Avdelningen för bygg- energi- och miljöteknik.
    Glaumann, Mauritz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Ola
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Westerberg, Ulla
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Framework for Detailed Comparison of Building Environmental Assessment Tools2013In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 39-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding how Building Environmental Assessments Tools (BEATs) measure and define “environmental” building is of great interest to many stakeholders, but it is difficult to understand how BEATs relate to each other, as well as to make detailed and systematic tool comparisons. A framework for comparing BEATs is presented in the following which facilitates an understanding and comparison of similarities and differences in terms of structure, content, aggregation, and scope. The framework was tested by comparing three distinctly different assessment tools; LEED-NC v3, Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH), and EcoEffect. Illustrations of the hierarchical structure of the tools gave a clear overview of their structural differences. When using the framework, the analysis showed that all three tools treat issues related to the main assessment categories: Energy and Pollution, Indoor Environment, and Materials and Waste. However, the environmental issues addressed, and the parameters defining the object of study, differ and, subsequently, so do rating, results, categories, issues, input data, aggregation methodology, and weighting. This means that BEATs measure “environmental” building differently and push “environmental” design in different directions. Therefore, tool comparisons are important, and the framework can be used to make these comparisons in a more detailed and systematic way.

  • 17.
    Wang, Shaozhe
    et al.
    Wuhan Engn Consulting Bur, Wuhan 430014, Peoples R China..
    Sinha, Rajib
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. KTH Royal Inst Technol Stockholm, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, Dept Sustainable Dev Environm Sci & Engn SEED, Teknikringen 10B, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Life Cycle Assessment of Different Prefabricated Rates for Building Construction2021In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, Sweden has promoted prefabricated buildings supporting the increasing of prefabricated rates in buildings with precast components, in order to reduce the environmental problems caused by the construction sector. This study, focusing on the construction activities, examines how the increasing prefabricated rate could influence the environmental impacts of the construction sector. This study conducts a cradle-to-gate life cycle assessment (LCA) of a reference building with a prefabricated rate of 26% in the Stockholm Royal Seaport, and compares nine scenarios with prefabricated rates, ranging from 6% to 96%. The results indicate the water footprint decreases, but the total energy footprint and carbon footprint increase as the prefabricated rate increases. Among other impacts, terrestrial ecotoxicity shows the biggest increase with an increase of the prefabricated rate. This study reveals that material extraction is the largest influencing factor, causing a water footprint when the prefabricated rate increases. The impact changes in the energy footprint, carbon footprint, and terrestrial ecotoxicity, and are primarily determined by transport and are sensitive to transport distance and vehicle types.

  • 18.
    Wilhelmsson, Mats
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    How Does the Presentation of Energy Performance Affect the Price of Houses?: A Case Study of Detached Houses in Stockholm, Sweden2023In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 13, no 6, article id 1367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our study aims to analyse whether the capitalisation of a property's energy performance is affected by how it is presented. In place since 2002, there is an EU directive mandating the introduction of an energy performance certificate (EPC) when selling detached houses. This directive was implemented in Sweden in 2009. We analyse how EPC capitalised on housing prices during 2012-2018 for detached houses in Stockholm. This was previously carried out, but our contribution is to analyse both the effect of energy rating or labelling (A-G) and energy consumption (kWh/m(2)). How energy performance is communicated or displayed to potential buyers conveys that the format, style, and content of energy performance information may influence how buyers perceive its value and impact on the property's market price. We have information on energy rating, consumption, or both for selected properties. This allows us to test the hypothesis that how energy performance is presented affects pricing. We also tested whether information affects different age cohorts differently. The results indicate that how energy performance is presented and visualised is important and that information about rating and consumption might be considered as a substitute for each other. It is also clear that the capitalisation effect differs depending on the age of the building.

  • 19.
    Wu, Yidong
    et al.
    Anhui Univ Technol, Sch Business, Dept Finance & Stat, Maanshan 243032, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Yanbo
    Monash Univ, Sch Business, Melbourne, Vic 3161, Australia..
    Zhang, Yalin
    Nanjing Univ Posts & Telecommun, Sch Econ, Nanjing 210023, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Xianzhu
    Anhui Univ Technol, Sch Business, Dept Finance & Stat, Maanshan 243032, Peoples R China..
    Song, Zisheng
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    The Effect of Building Electricity Consumption on Residents' Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from China2022In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 710-, article id 710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Residential electricity consumption has an important impact on China's construction of a low-carbon society. However, at present, little of the literature analyzes the influencing factors of residents' overall well-being from the perspective of micro investigation. Based on the micro mixed cross section data of the Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), this paper empirically studies the impact of residential electricity consumption on residents' subjective well-being. In addition, in the heterogeneity analysis, we found that an increase in residential electricity consumption will improve the overall well-being of females and people with low levels of education, but it has no significant effect on males and people with high levels of education. Moreover, the increase in residential electricity consumption has improved the life satisfaction of young people and middle-aged people. Meanwhile, the increase in residential electricity consumption has a significant, positive impact on both low-income and high-income households. Further analysis shows that no nonlinear relationship exists between the increase in residents' power consumption and the improvement in life satisfaction. This paper enriches the research on residential energy and provides policy implications for the current Chinese government to save energy, reduce emissions, and improve residents' quality of life.

  • 20.
    Yaqoob, Saima
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Silfwerbrand, Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Concrete Structures.
    Balieu, Romain
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Structural Engineering and Bridges.
    A Parametric Study Investigating the Dowel Bar Load Transfer Efficiency in Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement Using a Finite Element Model2024In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transverse joints are introduced in jointed plain concrete pavement systems to mitigate the risk of cracks that can develop due to shrinkage and temperature variations. However, the structural behaviour of jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP) is significantly affected by the transverse joint, as it creates a discontinuity between adjacent slabs. The performance of JPCP at the transverse joints is enhanced by providing steel dowel bars in the traffic direction. The dowel bar provides reliable transfer of traffic loads from the loaded side of the joint to the unloaded side, known as load transfer efficiency (LTE) or joint efficiency (JE). Furthermore, dowel bars contribute to the slab’s alignment in the JPCP. Joints are the critical component of concrete pavements that can lead to various distresses, necessitating rehabilitation. The Swedish Transport Administration (Trafikverket) is concerned with the repair of concrete pavement. Precast concrete slabs are efficient for repairing concrete pavement, but their performance relies on well-functioning dowel bars. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model (3D-FEM) was developed using the ABAQUS software to evaluate the structural response of JPCP and analyse the flexural stress concentration in the concrete slab by considering the dowel bar at three different locations (i.e., at the concrete slabs’ top, bottom, and mid-height). Furthermore, the structural response of JPCP was also investigated for several important parameters, such as the joint opening between adjacent slabs, mispositioning of dowel bars (horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal translations), size (diameter) of the dowel bar, and bond between the slab and the dowel bar. The study found that the maximum LTE occurred when the dowel bar was positioned at the mid-depth of the concrete slab. An increase in the dowel bar diameter yielded a 3% increase in LTE. Conversely, the increase in the joint opening between slabs led to a 2.1% decrease in LTE. Additionally, the mispositioning of dowel bars in the horizontal and longitudinal directions showed a 2.1% difference in the LTE. However, a 0.5% reduction in the LTE was observed for a vertical translation. Moreover, an approximately 0.5% increase in LTE was observed when there was improved bonding between the concrete slab and dowel bar. These findings can be valuable in designing and evaluating dowel-jointed plain concrete pavements.

  • 21.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Perceived Acoustic Quality and Effect on Occupants’ Satisfaction in Green and Conventional Residential Buildings2019In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presented in this paper focuses on the subjective opinions of occupants of multistory residential buildings by examining the relationship between occupants’ satisfaction and indoor environment quality, and analysing the effect the problems experienced with noise level may have on general satisfaction and the perceived acoustic quality. The analysis is based on data collected through surveys addressed to adults living in green and conventional buildings. The results show that occupants are very satisfied with their apartments, and subjectively rated acoustic quality received very high scores. The responses indicate that noise from neighbours has been experienced relatively seldom by occupants; however, the analysis shows that it is the factor that has the strongest effect on satisfaction with acoustic quality. We have found that the environmental profile of a building has a significant effect on general satisfaction expressed by occupants; however, this effect has not been confirmed for acoustic quality.

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  • 22.
    Zalejska-Jonsson, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Business and Financial Systems.
    Lind, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Building and Real Estate Economics.
    Hintze, Staffan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Energy-Efficient Technologies and the Building’s Saleable Floor Area: Bust or Boost for Highly-Efficient Green Construction?2013In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 570-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the external measurements of a building are fixed, an increase in external wall thickness caused by additional insulation, for example, will lead to loss of saleable floor area. This issue has to be taken into account in the evaluation of investment profitability. This paper examines how technologies used in energy-efficient residential building construction affect the available saleable floor area and how this impacts profitability of investment. Using a modeled building and an analysis of the average construction cost, we assessed losses and gains of saleable floor area in energy-efficient buildings. The analysis shows that the impact of potential losses or gains of saleable floor area should be taken into account when comparing investment alternatives: building energy-efficient green dwellings or building conventional ones. The results indicate that constructing energy-efficient buildings and introducing very energy-efficient technologies may be energy- and cost-effective even compared with conventional buildings. Employing new products in energy-efficient construction allows benefit to be drawn from lower energy consumption during the life cycle of the building, but also from the increase in saleable floor area.

  • 23.
    Zheng, Mo
    et al.
    Institution of Investment Management Center, Happy Life Insurance Co., Ltd., Beijing, 102206, China.
    Song, Han-Suck
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Economics and Finance.
    Liang, Jian
    School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane City, QLD 4000, Australia.
    Modeling the Volatility of Daily Listed Real Estate Returns during Economic Crises: Evidence from Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity Models2024In: Buildings, E-ISSN 2075-5309, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we focus on the dynamic volatility behavior of the daily Swedish Real Estate Sector Index and analyze the existence and degree of a long-range dependence or asymmetric news effect since 2003. More specifically, we give extra attention to the 2007–2008 financial crisis, the 2009–2012 European debt crisis, and the first two years of the global COVID-19 pandemic era (2020–2021). We examine changes in volatility during these extreme events. We apply standard GARCH models, asymmetric GARCH models, and long-memory GARCH models with various error distributions to identify the most accurate volatility models of the daily returns of the Swedish Real Estate Sector Index for the full sample period, January 2003 to June 2021. Our results show that the volatility of the Swedish Real Estate Sector Index is time-varying and highly volatile. The impacts of the global financial crisis, European debt crisis, and COVID-19 pandemic are noticeable. Moreover, the volatility pattern during COVID-19 displays significant time-varying long-range dependence and an asymmetrical news impact, which lead to market inefficiency. Finally, the volatility pattern shows a tendency towards increasing leverage effects and less persistent behavior, indicating that the market stakeholders are highly sensitive to negative returns and becoming quicker to respond to market changes.

1 - 23 of 23
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