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  • 1.
    Brinkerink, Maarten
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, A.
    System dynamics within typical days of a high variable 2030 European power system2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 22, p. 94-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of variability in electricity generation on future high variable European power systems is a subject of extensive research within the current scientific literature. The common approach in these studies, regarding the assessment of the impact of the variability and related balancing assets, is by showing yearly aggregates (or longer) of results based on a variety of indicators. Although significant, these studies often lack in temporal details. This paper therefore focuses on the dynamics between load, generation, marginal cost and assets for balancing the generation variability, within a variety of typical days in a fully-integrated European power market. This is done by assessments of daily snapshots based on an hourly time resolution. The assessments underline the necessity of balancing assets, both during peaks as well as during lows in the output of variable generators. Interconnection capacity, electricity storage and demand response (DR) applications all contribute to renewables integration and to optimized utilization of cost-efficient generation capacity throughout the European power system. Important load flows from and towards load centers with high capacities of variable renewables are identified, as well as a significant role for transit countries with high interconnection capacities between these load centers. Despite the importance of electricity storage, it is shown that the traditional diurnal utilization of centralized electricity storage fleets becomes less viable with increasing penetration of variable renewables. A potential high CO2 price in the future European power market can become a determining factor in the system dynamics. Large price differentials in the merit order stimulate long distance flows as well as an increasing profitability for storage assets.

  • 2. Brouwer, F.
    et al.
    Avgerinopoulos, Georgios
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Fazekas, D.
    Laspidou, C.
    Mercure, J. -F
    Pollitt, H.
    Ramos, Eunice Pereira
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Energy modelling and the Nexus concept2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 19, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nexus concept is the interconnection between the resources energy, water, food, land and climate. Such interconnections enable to address trade-offs and seek for synergies among them. Several policy areas (e.g. bio-based economy, circular economy) increasingly consider the Nexus concept. Ignoring synergies and trade-offs between energy and natural flows, can generate misleading modelling outcomes. Several modelling tools are available to address energy and the Nexus. Based on six such models, this paper aims to support the design and testing of coherent strategies for sustainable development. Model improvements would be achieved by comparing model outcomes and including a common baseline.

  • 3. Fais, Birgit
    et al.
    Keppo, Ilkka
    Zeyringer, Marianne
    Usher, William
    Daly, Hannah
    Impact of technology uncertainty on future low-carbon pathways in the UK2016In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 13-14, p. 154-168Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. University College London, United Kingdom.
    Keppo, I.
    Strachan, N.
    Myopic decision making in energy system decarbonisation pathways. A UK case study2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 17, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an application on the UK, this paper shows that myopic planning might result in delayed strategic investments and in considerably higher costs for achieving decarbonisation targets compared to estimates done with perfect foresight optimisation energy models. It also suggests that carbon prices obtained from perfect foresight energy models might be under-estimated. The study was performed using a combination of the standard UK Times Model (UKTM), a perfect foresight, bottom-up, technology-rich cost optimisation energy model, and its myopic foresight version: My-UKTM. This also demonstrates that using perfect foresight optimisation models in tandem with their myopic equivalents can provide valuable indications for policy design.

  • 5.
    Gardumi, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Morrison, Robbie
    Schillerstr 85, D-10627 Berlin, Germany..
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Beltramo, Agnese
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sridharan, Vignesh
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Hoersch, Jonas
    Frankfurt Inst Adv Studies, Frankfurt, Germany..
    Niet, Taco
    British Columbia Inst Technol, Burnaby, BC, Canada..
    Almulla, Youssef
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Ramos, Eunice
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Burandt, Thorsten
    Tech Univ Berlin, Workgrp Econ & Infrastruct Policy WIP, Berlin, Germany..
    Pena Balderrama, J. Gabriela
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Pinto de Moura, Gustavo Nikolaus
    Univ Fed Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil..
    Zepeda, Eduardo
    United Nations Dept Econ & Social Affairs, Dev Policy & Anal Div, New York, NY USA..
    Alfstad, Thomas
    United Nations Dept Econ & Social Affairs, Dev Policy & Anal Div, New York, NY USA..
    From the development of an open-source energy modelling tool to its application and the creation of communities of practice: The example of OSeMOSYS2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 20, p. 209-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decades, energy modelling has supported energy planning by offering insights into the dynamics between energy access, resource use, and sustainable development. Especially in recent years, there has been an attempt to strengthen the science-policy interface and increase the involvement of society in energy planning processes. This has, both in the EU and worldwide, led to the development of open-source and transparent energy modelling practices. This paper describes the role of an open-source energy modelling tool in the energy planning process and highlights its importance for society. Specifically, it describes the existence and characteristics of the relationship between developing an open-source, freely available tool and its application, dissemination and use for policy making. Using the example of the Open Source energy Modelling System (OSeMOSYS), this work focuses on practices that were established within the community and that made the framework's development and application both relevant and scientifically grounded.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Daniel K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Sweden.
    Johansson, B.
    Månsson, A.
    Nilsson, L. J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI), Sweden.
    Sonnsjö, H.
    Energy security matters in the EU Energy Roadmap2015In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 6, p. 48-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy security has gained increasing prominence on the EU political agenda, but is often framed narrowly, in terms of import dependency or security of supply. In this paper we screen and scope out a more comprehensive suite of energy security aspects to be considered when assessing low-carbon energy scenarios and apply it using the EU Energy Roadmap as an example. Availability and affordability issues as well as security of demand matters and geopolitical security aspects are identified and discussed. External factors, e.g., future international climate treaties and international relations, are important for some energy security outcomes. A broader framing of energy security together with structured assessments on the security implications of energy transitions would benefit future EU energy policy.

  • 7.
    Khastieva, Dina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Hesamzadeh, Mohammad Reza
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Vogelsang, I.
    Rosellón, J.
    Amelin, Mikael
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Value of energy storage for transmission investments2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 24, p. 94-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates joint investment planning of transmission lines and energy storage. Energy storage can be seen as a complement to transmission infrastructure and can be used for transmission deferral. On the other hand, under certain conditions, when the expected profit of both sectors depends on congestion in the system, transmission and energy storage can be seen as competitors. The transmission sector is in this study assumed to be a natural monopoly and operation and planning of transmission lines is performed by an independent company whereas the energy storage owner company operates and invests under competitive market rules. Three main questions are addressed in this paper. First of all, will additional energy storage capacity contribute to the growth of social welfare? Second, how will incentive regulation of the transmission network affect the need for energy storage? Third, how will the choice of incentive regulation affect the value of energy storage. This paper first provides an overview of incentive regulation which can be applied to transmission investments. Then case studies based on a 6-node power system network and the IEEE 118-node system are proposed in order to answer the aforementioned questions. The results of the case studies show that energy storage investments complement transmission expansion and contribute to higher social welfare values. The benefits from energy storage investments are significantly higher under two investigated incentive regulations as compared to the case without incentive regulation. Thus, the transmission investment planning process should consider energy storage options.

  • 8.
    Larsen, M. A. D.
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Prod Storvet, Bldg 424, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Petrovic, S.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Prod Storvet, Bldg 424, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Segerström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Drews, M.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Prod Storvet, Bldg 424, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Liersch, S.
    Potsdam Inst Climate Impact Res, Telegraphenberg A 62, D-14473 Potsdam, Germany..
    Karlsson, K. B.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Prod Storvet, Bldg 424, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Challenges of data availability: Analysing the water-energy nexus in electricity generation2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 26, article id UNSP 100426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water is paramount for the operation of energy systems, for securing food supply and for the industry and municipalities. Intersectoral competition for water resources can negatively affect water scarce regions by e.g. power plants shutdowns, poor agricultural yields, and lack of potable water. Future economic and population growth as well as climate change is likely to exacerbate these patterns. However, models used for energy system management and planning in general do not properly include water availability which can lead to improper representations of water-energy interlinkages. The paper initially highlights the water usage rates of current technologies within electricity generation and technologies with a potential to reduce water usage, electricity consumption or GHG emissions. Secondly, the paper presents currently available data on current and future projected water resources as well as data on energy statistics relevant to water-energy nexus studies. Thirdly, implementation cases are presented showing examples of water-energy nexus studies for the data presented. Finally, the paper highlights main challenges in studying the linkage between water and energy. We find a substantial gap in the general availability and quality of regional and global data for detailed quantitative analyses and also identify a need for standardization of formats and data collection methodologies across data and disciplines. An effort towards a coordinated, and sustained open-access data framework with energy sector water usage at fine spatio-temporal scales alongside hydroclimatic observation and model data using common forcings and scenarios for future projections (of climate, socio-economy and technology) is therefore recommended for future water-energy nexus studies.

  • 9. Lehne, Johanna
    et al.
    Blyth, William
    Lahn, Glada
    Bazilian, M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Grafham, Owen
    Energy services for refugees and displaced people2016In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 13-14, p. 134-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current literature on energy access highlights energy deprivation on a regional or country basis, but frequently neglects those outside of national energy agendas such as refugees and displaced people. To fill this gap and to help inform future analysis, this paper presents an end-use accounting model for energy consumption for cooking and lighting by displaced populations. We present initial estimates for the overall scale of energy poverty and three high-level scenarios for improving access to energy for cooking and lighting. Key findings suggest that as many as 7 million displaced people in camps have access to electricity for less than 4 h a day and that the widespread introduction of improved cookstoves and basic solar lanterns could save $303 million a year in fuel costs after an initial capital investment of $334 million. We conclude that there is a strong human, economic, and environmental case to be made for improving energy access for refugees and displaced people, and for recognising energy as a core concern within humanitarian relief efforts.

  • 10.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Siyal, Shahid Hussain
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Korkovelos, Alexandros
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Estimating the spatially explicit wind generated electricity cost in Africa - A GIS based analysis2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 17, p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, more than 620 million people in Africa live without access to electricity. Nowhere in the world is the chasm between available energy resources and access to electricity greater than on the African continent. With the exception of conventional hydropower, the share of renewable energy in the electricity mix remains insignificant, despite the considerable untapped renewable energy potential in the region. A critical issue in the development of renewable energy sources is the cost, which is a function of the resource availability, the geographic and topological characteristics of a studied area as well as the selected energy conversion technologies. This paper applies a detailed Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach in order to identify the cost of generating electricity using onshore wind turbines considering several localization criteria. The levelized cost of wind generated electricity is calculated geospatially and shall be used as an indicator to compare different suitable sites at the pre-feasibility stage. The levelized cost of generating electricity varies between 0.04 and 0.17 USD/kWh, placing wind power in a cost competitive position in the electricity market of the continental countries.

  • 11.
    Mueller, Berit
    et al.
    RLI, Berlin, Germany..
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Huelk, Ludwig
    RLI, Berlin, Germany..
    Comprehensive representation of models for energy system analyses: Insights from the Energy Modelling Platform for Europe (EMP-E) 20172018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 21, p. 82-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses different approaches that are used to present and categorise models used in energy system analysis, with the overall objective to improve their quality, efficiency, and outreach to policy makers and public stakeholders involved in the European energy transition. A comprehensive literature review identifying strengths and limitations of existing approaches of classification is conducted. It highlights the tendency towards a versatile presentation of models, where the same set of information is available for all users while the way it is presented can be customised according to the background and interests of several stakeholder groups (e.g., modellers, researchers in the energy field, policy advisers, and policy makers). Online platforms enhance this concept by allowing dynamic adaptations. We think that improving this approach could be a potentially significant contribution to the scientific work in the field of energy system analysis. In addition to the literature review, we include experiences from the first meeting of the Energy Modelling Platform for Europe (EMP-E 2017). The participants used different formats to present their models. In the open space provided, the trade-off between simplicity and completeness of representation was visible. Feedback of the meeting showed that gathering European modellers and policy makers in a personal meeting is valuable as it motivates and improves exchange between modelling groups and between modellers and those stakeholders who are interested in specific results.

  • 12.
    Nevzorova, Tatiana
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Kutcherov, Vladimir G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology. Department of Physics, Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas (National Research University), Moscow, Russian Federation.
    Barriers to the wider implementation of biogas as a source of energy: A state-of-the-art review2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 26, p. 100414-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries have realised that biogas as a source of energy is an important component for sustainability transition. However, the total production volume of biogas is still relatively low. Such slow development raises a fundamental question—what are the current barriers hindering the wider uptake of biogas as a source of energy? In order to answer the question, a systematic state-of-the-art review of the barriers was conducted based on the Scopus database. The results of the review were summarised by country and were divided into two broad categories: developed and developing economies. Each group was analysed separately according to six types of barriers: (1) technical, (2) economic, (3) market, (4) institutional, (5) socio-cultural, and (6) environmental barriers. By analysing the barriers through different contexts, the most frequent and crucial constraints the biogas industry currently faces were identified and integrated into a systematic classification. In addition, possible solutions on how to overcome the most critical barriers were added.

  • 13.
    Pang, Xi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Trubins, Renats
    Vidas, Lekavicius
    Galinas, Arvydas
    Mozgeris, Gintautas
    Kulbokas, Gintaras
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Forest bioenergy feedstock in Lithuania – renewable energy goals and the use of forest resources2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 24, p. 244-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demands on forest bioenergy feedstock are expected to increase in many countries due to climate change mitigation. However, sustainable use of forest biomass resources can be ensured only if local and landscape conditions are taken into account, linking energy use to its resource base. The aim of this study was to analyse the forest biomass potential for Lithuania’s energy pathways, while comparing the projected demand of forest bioenergy feedstock with resource projections. This was performed using the Landscape simulation and Ecological Assessment (LEcA) tool and the energy model MESSAGE. Biomass demand can be met up to 2050, after which demands under a Biomass Low pathway can still be met by the domestic forest resource if other wood uses are reduced, while Biomass High leads to a biomass deficit regarding domestic forest resource. Information exchange between the energy model and the LEcA tool enables an integrated sustainability assessment, and may contribute to a sustainable and efficient use of forest as a bioenergy feedstock resource.

  • 14.
    Pena Balderrama, J. Gabriela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. UMSS, Bolivia.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sevillano, R. Carlos
    Alejo, Lucio
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Techno-economic demand projections and scenarios for the Bolivian energy system2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 16, p. 96-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing energy access in emerging economies has played an important role to maintain or achieve desirable social and economic development targets. As a consequence, the growing energy requirements need policy instruments to ensure energy supply for future generations. The literature reports many studies with different approaches to model and test policy measures in the energy sector, however few energy-related studies for Bolivia are available. This paper addresses this knowledge gap, representing the first national level energy demand model and projections for Bolivia. The model use demographic, economic, technology and policy trends with a pragmatic model structure that combines bottom-up and top-down modelling. The scenario analysis has a particular focus on alternatives for energy savings, energy mix diversification and air quality. Three scenarios were analysed: Energy Savings, Fuel Substitution and the aggregate effects in a Combined scenario. The reference scenario results show the overall energy consumption grows 134% in 2035 compared to 2012 with an annual average growth of 3.8%. The final energy demand in the energy savings scenario is 8.5% lower than the Reference scenario, 1.5% lower in the fuel substitution scenario and 9.4% lower in the combined Scenario. The aggregate impact of both energy savings and fuel substitution measures leads to potential avoided emissions of 25.84 million Tons of CO2 equivalent in the model horizon 2012-2035.

  • 15. Pfenninger, Stefan
    et al.
    Hirth, Lion
    Schlecht, Ingmar
    Schmid, Eva
    Wiese, Frauke
    Brown, Tom
    Davis, Chris
    Gidden, Matthew
    Heinrichs, Heidi
    Heuberger, Clara
    Hilpert, Simon
    Krien, Uwe
    Matke, Carsten
    Nebel, Arjuna
    Morrison, Robbie
    Mueller, Berit
    Plessmann, Guido
    Reeg, Matthias
    Richstein, Joern C.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Staffell, Iain
    Trondle, Tim
    Wingenbach, Clemens
    Opening the black box of energy modelling: Strategies and lessons learned2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 19, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global energy system is undergoing a major transition, and in energy planning and decision-making across governments, industry and academia, models play a crucial role. Because of their policy relevance and contested nature, the transparency and open availability of energy models and data are of particular importance. Here we provide a practical how-to guide based on the collective experience of members of the Open Energy Modelling Initiative (Openmod). We discuss key steps to consider when opening code and data, including determining intellectual property ownership, choosing a licence and appropriate modelling languages, distributing code and data, and providing support and building communities. After illustrating these decisions with examples and lessons learned from the community, we conclude that even though individual researchers' choices are important, institutional changes are still also necessary for more openness and transparency in energy research.

  • 16. Pinto de Moura, G. N.
    et al.
    Loureiro Legey, L. F.
    Balderrama, Gabriela Peña
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    South America power integration, Bolivian electricity export potential and bargaining power: An OSeMOSYS SAMBA approach2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 17, p. 27-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bolivia has plenty of energy resources that can supply not only its own electricity demand but has also the potential to export surplus production to its neighbors in South America. This study presents a comparative analysis of the electricity export potential of Bolivia, considering modeling results carried out by the Bolivian government and those from OSeMOSYS SAMBA - South America Model Base. Four scenarios were modelled from different conceptions of strategic large hydropower combinations. The scenarios comparison highlights the cross-border potential trade between Bolivia and neighboring countries, mainly Brazil. Using a Cooperative Games approach, through the calculation of the Shapley value, the bargaining power of Bolivia was identified, reaching its higher value in the scenario where El Bala and Cachuela Esperanza dams are present. The cooperative games approach provides a better understanding of electricity trade opportunities to support policy makers in international negotiations, thus considerably reducing incentives to non-cooperative actions.

  • 17.
    Riva, Fabio
    et al.
    Politecn Milan, Dept Energy, Via Lambruschini 4, Milan, Italy..
    Tognollo, Annalisa
    Politecn Milan, Dept Energy, Via Lambruschini 4, Milan, Italy..
    Gardumi, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Colombo, Emanuela
    Politecn Milan, Dept Energy, Via Lambruschini 4, Milan, Italy..
    Long-term energy planning and demand forecast in remote areas of developing countries: Classification of case studies and insights from a modelling perspective2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 20, p. 71-89Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than half a billion people will still lack reliable and affordable electricity in 2040 and around 1.8 billion may remain reliant on traditional solid biomass for cooking. Long-term energy planning could help to achieve the energy access targets in developing countries, especially in remote rural areas. Different studies exist on long-term rural electricity and thermal energy planning, but the different foci, terminology and methodologies make it difficult to track their similarities, weaknesses and strengths. With this work, we aim at providing a critical analysis of peer-reviewed studies on long-term rural energy planning, to help researchers in the field move across the diverse know-how developed in the last decades. The work resulted in the analysis of 130 studies and categorisation of 85 of them that focus on electricity, thermal energy, and oil supply in rural areas, under a number of rules clearly defined in the first part of the paper. We classify the studies in two consecutive steps, first according to their type and afterwards according to the methodology they employ to forecast the energy demand, which is one the most critical aspects when dealing with long-term rural energy planning. The work also provides specific insights, useful to researchers interested in rural energy modelling. Few studies assume a dynamic demand over the years and most of them do not consider any evolution of the future energy load, or forecast its growth through arbitrary trends and scenarios. This however undermines the relevance of the results for the purpose of long-term planning and highlights the necessity of further developing the forecasting methodologies. We conclude that bottom-up approaches, system-dynamics and agent-based models seem appropriate approaches to forecast the evolution of the demand for energy in the long-term; we analyse their potential capability to tackle the context-specific complexities of rural areas and the nexus causalities among energy and socio-economic dynamics.

  • 18.
    Runsten, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Tait, L.
    Energy provision in South African informal urban Settlements - A multi-criteria sustainability analysis2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 19, p. 76-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, as in much of sub-Saharan Africa, strong urbanization trends lead to people settling in ever less suitable informal locations, which are often considered ineligible for basic service provision. This study explores how access to basic energy services can be provided to informal urban households in South Africa that are ineligible for grid electrification. This is done through a multi-criteria sustainability analysis of current and alternative ways of accessing energy services. The case of the Western Cape Province is explored, showing that barriers for electrification can be overcome in some cases, given that there is political will at the local level to do so. When electrification is unviable, off-grid electricity alternatives combined with support for access to modern cooking fuels may provide short or medium-term solutions. This study further suggests that governmental efforts of meeting basic energy needs must be persistently oriented and structured towards access to energy services, as opposed to supply of electricity. 

  • 19.
    Sarfati, Mahir
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Hesamzadeh, Mohammad Reza
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electric Power and Energy Systems.
    Holmberg, Pär
    Res Inst Ind Econ IPN, Stockholm, Sweden.;Univ Cambridge, Energy Policy Res Grp, Cambridge, England.;Stanford Univ, PESD, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Production efficiency of nodal and zonal pricing in imperfectly competitive electricity markets2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 24, p. 193-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity markets employ different congestion management methods to handle the limited transmission capacity of the power system. This paper compares production efficiency and other aspects of nodal and zonal pricing. We consider two types of zonal pricing: zonal pricing with Available Transmission Capacity (ATC) and zonal pricing with Flow-Based Market Coupling (FBMC). We develop a mathematical model to study the imperfect competition under zonal pricing with FBMC. Zonal pricing with FBMC is employed in two stages, a dayahead market stage and a re-dispatch stage. We show that the optimality conditions and market clearing conditions can be reformulated as a mixed integer linear program (MILP), which is straightforward to implement. Zonal pricing with ATC and nodal pricing is used as our benchmarks. The imperfect competition under zonal pricing with ATC and nodal pricing are also formulated as MILP models. All MILP models are demonstrated on 6-node and the modified IEEE 24-node systems. Our numerical results show that the zonal pricing with ATC results in large production inefficiencies due to the inc-dec game. Improving the representation of the transmission network as in the zonal pricing with FBMC mitigates the inc-dec game.

  • 20.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Dobbins, A.
    University of Stuttgart-IER, Stuttgart, Germany.
    Fahl, U.
    University of Stuttgart-IER, Stuttgart, Germany.
    Singh, A.
    Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland.
    Drivers of renewable energy deployment in the EU: An analysis of past trends and projections2019In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 26, article id 100402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy policy in the European Union (EU) is driven by the objective to transition to an affordable, reliable, and low carbon energy system. To achieve this objective, the EU has explicitly stated targets for greenhouse reduction, shares of renewable energy sources (RES), and energy efficiency improvements for 2020 and 2030. In this paper, we focus on the drivers, barriers and enablers to achieving the EU's RES targets (20% by 2020 and 27% by 2030). Effective energy policies play a key role in the deployment of RES technologies. In order to design effective policies, a clear understanding of past trends and projections for future deployment is required. In this paper, we first analyse the past deployment of RES technologies for electricity supply (RES-E) in selected EU Member States. This highlights the key drivers, barriers, and enablers for deployment of RES in the past. In a second step, we conduct a meta-analysis of projections for RES-E shares from multiple well-established studies. Such an analysis will help in supporting the design of more effective energy policies and successfully achieving the EU's energy targets.

  • 21.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Dobbins, Audrey
    University of Stuttgart-IER.
    Fahl, Ulrich
    University of Stuttgart-IER.
    Singh, Antriksh
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    DRIVERS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY DEPLOYMENT IN THE EU: AN ANALYSIS OF PAST TRENDS AND PROJECTIONSIn: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy policy in the European Union (EU) is driven by the objective to transition to an affordable, reliable, and low carbon energy system. To achieve this objective, the EU has explicitly stated targets for greenhouse reduction, shares of renewable energy sources (RES), and energy efficiency improvements for 2020 and 2030. In this paper, we focus on the drivers, barriers and enablers to achieving the EU’s RES targets (20% by 2020 and 27% by 2030). Effective energy policies play a key role in the deployment of RES technologies. In order to design effective policies, a clear understanding of past trends and projections for future deployment is required. In this paper, we first analyse the past deployment of RES technologies for electricity supply (RES-E) in selected EU Member States. This highlights the key drivers, barriers, and enablers for deployment of RES in the past. In a second step, we conduct a meta-analysis of projections for RES-E shares from multiple well-established studies. Such an analysis will help in supporting the design of more effective energy policies and successfully achieving the EU’s energy targets.

  • 22.
    Shivakumar, Abhishek
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Pye, Steve
    University College London.
    Anjo, João
    KTH.
    Miller, Michael
    University of Stuttgart - IER.
    Rouelle, Pierre Boutinard
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    Densing, Martin
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    Kober, Tom
    Paul Scherrer Institute.
    Smart energy solutions in the EU: State of play and measuring progress2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 20, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European energy system is undergoing, and will continue to in the future, a transition towards a more sustainable energy system. An important part of this will be the deployment of smart energy solutions in the household sector, including smart meters, controls, appliances, and their integration in home networks. This study is in support of the Commission's work related to smart energy solutions in the framework of the SET plan, in particular in understanding methods to develop indicators that can be used to measure progress under the Declaration of Intent for the Action 3.1 on Initiative for Smart solutions for energy consumers. First, ‘smart energy solutions’ are defined and the type of technologies that this includes are detailed. Once the scope has been established, existing indicators that are able to monitor the levels of deployment of such technologies will be reviewed. This includes indicators being proposed or used by international and Member State level energyagencies and other organisations. It is not intended that this study will comprehensively assess the actual deployment of smart energy solutions across all EU Member States. Instead, selected countries who are more advanced in the deployment of such technologies are considered in more detail. These include France, Switzerland, Ireland, UK, and Sweden. Finally, we review estimates of the potential of demand response in Europe to achieve goals related to energy efficiency, cost savings, and renewable energy penetration.

  • 23.
    Taliotis, Constantinos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. Columbia University, United States .
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Gielen, D.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Grand Inga to power Africa: Hydropower development scenarios to 20352014In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 4, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vision of harnessing the Congo River's immense flow to generate power for the African continent has existed in the agenda of energy planners and politicians for nearly a century. However after the installations of Inga I in 1972 and Inga II in 1982, progress came to a standstill. Recently though the larger aspirations of Grand Inga seem to be moving forward again. Construction of Inga III low-head is set to commence in 2015 with a projected capacity of 4755MW, of which 2500MW are contracted for the South African market. Upon completion, the total capacity of Grand Inga could reach 42GW. In this paper, we present scenario-driven results of a Sub-Saharan African-focused partial-equilibrium energy model related to the further development of the project. The analysis is presented to show the broad range of possible energy futures related to this project, without taking into deep consideration the admittedly important issues related to governance, environmental impacts or social tensions. Scenarios are developed to assess the energy outlook of the Central African power pool, in which Grand Inga is located, and the exchange of electricity between regions when the project is completed. The project has the potential to cover the increasing needs for power in this power pool and provide electricity exports to other regions; primarily Southern and Western Africa in a high demand scenario and Southern and Northern Africa in a low demand scenario.

  • 24.
    Xylia, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Leading or lagging in the EU? Sweden’s progress towards energy efficiency targets for 20202016In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden aims at becoming one of the first fossil-free welfare countries in the world. In line with that goal, ambitious energy and climate targets were announced in 2009. The focus of this paper is energy efficiency, since its progress towards the 2020 target lags in relation to the other energy and climate policy targets. Statistical methods for time series analysis are applied in order to compare the country’s performance in comparison to the EU-28 average and explore the potential development of energy use at national and sectoral level in the years up to 2020. The results show that Swedish progress with energy efficiency does not stand out within the EU-28, in contrast with other energy and climate targets. The trend analysis also shows that it is uncertain whether the targets for 2020 will be achieved. Energy intensity may not be the most appropriate indicator for monitoring energy efficiency improvement, and absolute final energy savings should be used instead. The analysis for the three main Swedish end-use sectors shows decreasing final energy use trends in the past ten years.  However, none of the sectors is expected to show strongly decreasing trends in the upcoming years. In order to enhance the role of energy efficiency in energy and climate policy, its contribution in reducing emissions should be clarified and promoted. Finally, increased simplicity and transparency should be established when setting targets for energy efficiency and monitoring progress.

1 - 24 of 24
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