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  • 1. Bergström, Jonas P.
    et al.
    Gry, Marcus
    Lengqvist, Johan
    Lindberg, Johan
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Watkins, Paul B.
    Schuppe Koistinen, Ina
    Novel DILI biomarkers for prediction of acetaminophen-induced human hepatotoxicity2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S76-S76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Beronius, A.
    et al.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hanberg, A.
    Improving the transparency of data evaluation in risk assessment of endocrine disrupting compounds-Implications from the bisphenol A case study2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 205, p. S256-S256Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex biology and toxicology of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) makes toxicity testing as well as evaluation of data for risk assessment difficult. Standardized test guidelines have previously been questioned as to their applicability for evaluating EDC toxicity. However, several guidelines have been updated and enhanced in an effort to better cover EDCs. Also, EDC toxicity is a very active research field and a lot of toxicological data are generated in research studies NOT conducted according to standardized guidelines. Our previous work indicates that differences in how the reliability and relevance of toxicity studies are judged may vary greatly between risk assessments of the same compound and may result in different conclusions about the size and nature of health risks. Further, the process of data evaluation is in many cases in-transparent. The purpose of this on-going study is to contribute to making health risk assessments of EDCs more transparent, systematic, and predictable. The investigation is conducted as a literature study using the EDC bisphenol A (BPA) for a case study. We scrutinize and compare the strengths and weaknesses of both guideline and non-guideline studies evaluating developmental neurotoxicity of BPA. One goal is to further assess the applicability of standardized guidelines in this case. Another aim is to propose improvements in the process of data reporting of non-guideline studies and recommend criteria for the evaluation of data in order to facilitate risk assessment of EDCs.

  • 3.
    Beronius, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Willighagen, Egon
    Maastricht Univ, Maastricht, Netherlands .
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hanberg, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Factors influencing developmental neurotoxicity study outcome in the bisphenol A case2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S128-S129Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4. Chaudhry, Qasim A.
    et al.
    Hanke, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Study of intracellular reaction and diffusion mechanism of carcinogenic PAHs: Using non-standard compartment modeling approach2013In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 221, p. S182-S182Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cronholm, Pontus
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Hanna L.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Jonas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lowe, Troy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Elihn, Karine
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Wallinder, Inger Odnevall
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Möller, Lennart
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A Trojan Horse type mechanism: Cellular dose and toxicity of Ag and CuO nanoparticles2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S201-S201Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ding, Qian
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rudén, Christina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Are the new Chinese chemicals regulations catching up with REACH?2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ding, Qian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Schenk, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    A comparison of occupational exposure limits in Asia and Europe2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 205, p. S241-S241Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational exposure limits (OELs) are used as a risk management tool aiming at protecting against negative health effects due to occupational exposure to harmful substances. The systems of OELs development have not been standardized and the divergent outcomes have been reported. However some harmonization process has been initiated, primary in Europe. This study aims at analysis of the state of harmonization in a more global context. The OELs systems of eight Asian and seventeen European organizations are analyzed with respect to: (1) the information regarding each organization's system for determining OELs; (2) similarity of substance selection in each system; (3) similarity of value levels of OEL. The analysis shows that the majority of investigated organizations declare to be influenced by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) systems, what in many cases is empirically confirmed. The EU harmonization process is also reflected in results showing the trends of convergence within the EU. However, the comparisons of Asian and European organisations indicate that there is no obvious evidence that OELs are becoming globally harmonized.

  • 8.
    Dreij, Kristian
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Chaudhry, Qasim A.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Zhang, Jie
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Sundberg, Kathrin
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Jernström, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hanke, Michael
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Morgenstern, Ralf
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    In silico modeling of the intracellular dynamics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S60-S61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gupta, G. S.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Mol Toxicol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gliga, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Mol Toxicol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedberg, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Serra, A.
    Univ Tampere, Inst Biosci & Med Technol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Inst Biotechnol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Greco, D.
    Univ Tampere, Inst Biosci & Med Technol, Tampere, Finland.;Univ Helsinki, Inst Biotechnol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Fadeel, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Mol Toxicol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cobalt-impregnated tungsten nanoparticles and cobalt ions trigger toxicity in differentiating neuronal cells: potential link to parkinsonian neurodegeneration2019In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 314, p. S201-S202Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History.
    Assessment factors for extrapolation from short-time to chronic exposure-Are the REACH guidelines adequate2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S243-S243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11. Hedberg, Jesper
    et al.
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Donnes, Pierre
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Molecular profiling of human kidney injury using antibody suspension bead arrays2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S94-S94Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Stockmann-Juvala, Helene Helene
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland .
    Zitting, Antti
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland .
    Santonen, Tiina
    Finnish Inst Occupat Hlth, Helsinki, Finland .
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Relevance of in vitro studies for in vivo inhalation toxicity of 316L powder2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S125-S125Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13. Huuskonen, Sirpa
    et al.
    Heinala, Milla
    Herting, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Santonen, Tiina
    Human health risk assessment of ferrosilicon alloys under REACH2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S178-S178Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Andersson, Patrik
    Nordberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Bergman, Åke
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Human experts' judgment of chemicals reactivity for identification of hazardous chemicals2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S243-S243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Nanomaterials in REACH2010In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 196, p. S105-S105Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation aims to address the problematics of assessing and managing risks of nanomaterials (NMs) by the means of REACH regulation. It is based on the authors contribution to the project Nanomaterials in REACH that brings together international expertise on chemicals regulation, physico-chemical properties and toxicity of nanomaterials, and environmental and technology policy, and was initiated January 2010. The main aim of the project is to evaluate the current EU chemicals regulation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals) to ensure that the unique characteristics of nanoparticles (NPs) and NMs are taken into account in the implementation of the regulatory framework. This may require specific recommendations for NMs and specific recommendations to deal with human and environmental hazards associated with these materials. Current discussion covers following topics: REACH provisions for registration of nanomaterials and data requirements, definitions, substance identification, standardization and methodology for hazard identification and risk characterisation. We have put forward hypothesis that all nanomaterials should be treated as new substances until proven otherwise. At this stage in our view, the NMs specific provisions triggering registration and data requirements as well as chemical safety report should be developed. The current provisions for the registration of substances in articles do not reflect or consider: (1) the unknown hazards that nanomaterials could potentially pose (only known SVHC are to be registered); (2) unique properties of nanomaterials associated with high activity of very low quantities (the quantity of 0.1% w/w in the final product might not be reached while the risk for the hazard is high; (3) unique applications like coatings that can results in higher exposure then anticipated from the total quantity being below the 0.1% w/w of the final product. Further analysis and discussions are on-going.

  • 16.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Assessment factors for extrapolation from short-time to chronic exposure-Are the REACH guidelines adequate?2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 190, no 1, p. 16-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the relative scarcity of long-term toxicity data, assessment factors for extrapolation from relatively short to chronic exposures have an important role in the risk assessment of chemicals. A recent REACH guidance document includes recommended default assessment factors that cover subacute-subchronic, subchronic-chronic, and subacute-chronic extrapolations. The recommended assessment factors are smaller than in most previous proposals, since they are calibrated to achieve central estimates (50th percentile of the target distribution) rather than a higher percentile such as the 95th, as has been more common. These assessment factors are nevertheless presented as representing a "widely agreed level of conservatism", a statement that may lead to misunderstandings of what is achieved by using them in a risk assessment. Assessment factors have been based on evidence from animal studies with different designs, in particular with focus on different endpoints. Our re-analysis of experimental data shows that using mortality as an endpoint leads to smaller assessment factors than if the factors are derived from corresponding ratios for non-lethal toxicity.

  • 17.
    Malkiewicz, Katarzyna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Pettitt, M.
    Dawson, K. A.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Lynch, I.
    Lead, J.
    Nanomaterials in reach2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 205, p. S45-S45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several critical differences between the “nano” forms of substances and their “bulk” counterparts may necessitate additional considerations in regulatory frameworks to adequately address potential risks posed by nanomaterials (NMs). The aim of this presentation is to address the problematics of assessing and managing risks of NMs by the means of EU chemicals regulation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization of Chemicals). It is based on the results of the SKEP-ERA net project “Nanomaterials in REACH”, which during year 2010 gathered international expertise on chemicals regulation, physico-chemical properties and toxicity of NMs, and environmental and technology policy. Analysis and discussion points cover following topics: definitions concerning nanomaterials, REACH provisions for registration of NMs as substances, and in articles (including “phase-in”/“non-phase-in” status, mass based tonnage thresholds, “prioritization” criteria, classification as hazardous, percentage thresholds in articles), substance identification, scope of data requirements, standardization and methodology for human and environmental hazards identification and risk characterisation. Examples of resulting recommendations include: (1) adopt a single overarching definition of NMs for regulatory purposes; (2) treat “nano” forms as different from their “bulk” counterparts and as “non-phase in” substances; (3) differentiate “nano” forms with the same core chemistry using differences in the physicochemical parameters; (4) introduce mandatory list of physicochemical properties for substance identification; (5) introduce alternatives to the tonnage triggers; (6) develop register of comprehensive information on the presence of NMs in articles; (7) extend a scope of data requirements with nano-specific data requirements; (8) develop nano-specific criteria for inclusion in the SVHC list.

  • 18.
    Molander, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Beronius, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hanberg, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Endpoints and dose-response relationships of low-dose studies of Bisphenol A2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S130-S130Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Molander, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Breitholtz, M.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Missing links in the regulatory chain controlling life cycle emissions of hazardous chemicals from articles2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 205, p. S243-S243Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is widely acknowledged that the management of risks associated with chemicals in articles, including consumer products, needs to be improved.

    The purpose of the present study is to empirically analyze to what extent European legislations that control emissions of hazardous chemicals from articles during different life cycle phases are coherent or not. To illustrate this, the regulation of a number of case-study chemicals, used in various consumer products and in high volumes, is scrutinized. This analysis identifies missing regulatory links between the rules that are relevant for the use phase and the rules applicable to the waste phase. With the exception of the RoHS directive, a clear connection to the rules for waste is missing in the regulatory system. Clear links are also missing between the rules regulating chemical emissions during the articles’ life cycle and maximum environmental concentration limits set for sludge, soil and surface water. The Waste Directive, the WEEE Directive, and the Water Framework Directive refer to EU environmental and waste policies. These policies state that environmental damage should be rectified at source. The lack of connection between the rules regulating different phases of an article's life cycle makes these objectives difficult to fulfill. These legislative gaps will encourage end-of-pipe solutions, rather than actions to manage the source of the problem. We argue that it is necessary to minimize the input of hazardous chemicals into articles, so that waste and other end-products can be recovered and used without harming human health or the environment.

  • 20.
    Neus, Feliu Torres
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Walter, Marie V.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Montanez, Maria I.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kunzmann, Andrea
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hult, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fadeel, Bengt
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Biocompatibility of polyester dendrimers in comparison to polyamidoamine dendrimers2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S203-S204Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nordberg, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
    The usefulness of the bioconcentration factor as a tool for priority setting in chemicals control2007In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, no 168, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of the REACH system will lead to the creation of a single, uniform legislation for industrial chemicals in Europe. An important aim of this legislation is to generate toxicity data for previously untested chemicals. Testing tens of thousands of chemicals can however not be done in one step, and criteria for priority setting is therefore an essential part of the proposed REACH system. In this study we investigate potential consequences of using bioaccumulation (B) data as a tool for priority setting in chemicals control. The results of this investigation suggests that the use of data for the bioconcentration factor (BCF, as an estimation of B) at first tier will not introduce bias towards a particular type of toxicity (i.e. carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity or mutagenicity) in the priority setting process.

  • 22.
    Nordberg, Anna
    et al.
    KTH.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH.
    Towards developing efficient testing strategies - Analyzing the decision relevance of different toxicity tests2006In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 164, p. S78-S79Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Evaluation of carcinogen risk assessments and the role of evidence-based toxicology in chemicals control2008In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 180, p. S17-S17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    REACH is but the first step-on the need to improve testing and risk assessment for industrial chemicals2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S249-S249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    Ten proposals to improve testing and risk assessment2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S5-S6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
    What influences a health risk assessment?2006In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 167, no 3, p. 201-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper it is claimed that the health risk assessment process is influenced by (at least) four general factors, namely: the regulatory framework, the quality and availability of scientific data, general risk assessment principles, and case-by-case assumptions. Furthermore, the scientific basis of risk assessment relies on three overall types of methods for data generation: standardized animal experiments, epidemiology, and non-standardized mechanism data. In this paper, the use of the different types of data for risk assessment purposes are analyzed in the light of the factors claimed to influence the risk assessment process. It is concluded that the availability of pre-defined criteria for the interpretation and evaluation of data for regulatory health risk assessment purposes need to be further developed. Especially with the implementation of the new European chemicals legislation REACH.

  • 27.
    Rudén, Christina
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    How accurate are the European Union's classifications of chemical substances2003In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 159-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Commission has decided on harmonized classifications for a large number of individual chemicals according to its own directive for classification and labeling of dangerous substances. We have compared the harmonized classifications for acute oral toxicity to the acute oral toxicity data available in the RTECS database. Of the 992 substances eligible for this comparison, 15% were assigned a too low danger class and 8% a too high danger class according to the RTECS data. Due to insufficient transparency-scientific documentations of the classification decisions are not available-the causes of this discrepancy can only be hypothesized. We propose that the scientific motivations of future classifications be published and that the apparent over- and underclassifications in the present system be either explained or rectified, according to what are the facts in the matter.

  • 28.
    Rudén, Christina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Towards improved chemicals regulations: Designing efficient test systems2006In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 164, no SI, p. S147-S147Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Rudén, Christina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rosander, Per
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Bridging the gap between science and politics: The role of precaution in chemicals control2006In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 164, no SI, p. S148-S148Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Schenk, Linda
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Setting occupational exposure limits: Practices and outcomes2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S129-S129Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Schenk, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ding, Qian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Science and policy in risk-based occupational exposure limits2014In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 229, p. 120-120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Schenk, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Johanson, G.
    Comparing the safety margins in the European indicative occupational exposure limits and the derived no-effect levels under reach2011In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 205, p. S268-S268Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The new European Union (EU) REACH legislation requires Derived No-Effect Levels (DNEL) to be calculated for substances produced in quantities above 10 tonnes/year. Workers are one population that these DNELs are to protect. Meanwhile, the setting of occupational exposure limits (OEL) continues both at the member state and the EU level. Health-based OELs are proposed by the Commission's Scientific Committee on OELs (SCOEL) and eventually result in Indicative OEL Values (IOELV) in EU Directives. According to REACH, IOELVs may under some circumstances be used as worker-DNELs. On the other hand, worker-DNELs will be derived for several thousand substances, far more than the roughly 100 substances for which IOELVs have been established. Thus, the procedure to set health-based OELs may become influential on that of DNELs and vice versa. This study presents a comparison of the safety margins of 88 SCOEL recommendations with those of the corresponding worker-DNELs, derived according to the REACH guidance document. Overall, the REACH safety margins were approximately six times higher than those derived from the SCOEL documentation but varied widely with REACH/SCOEL ratios ranging by two orders of magnitude, from 0.3 to 58. It was also found that the REACH guidance document, although encompassing detailed advice on many issues, including default assessment factors for species and route extrapolation, gives no quantitative guidance on when and how to depart from defaults.

  • 33.
    Schenk, Linda
    et al.
    Södertörn University College.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University College.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Occupational Exposure Limits: A comparative study of the levels today and development during the past ten years2007In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 172, p. S123-S124Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Schenk, Linda
    et al.
    Södertörn University College.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Gilek, Michael
    Södertörn University College.
    Risk assessment and occupational exposure limits2008In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, p. S74-S74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Schenk, Linda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Wester, Misse
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Are occupational exposure limits still an effective tool for chemicals risk management at the work place?2010In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 196, p. S101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemicals in the occupational setting are well known to pose a variety of health risks to workers, and are accordingly subject to risk management measures. In Sweden, as well as many other countries, occupational exposure limits (OELs) are presented as an important tool for managing chemical risks. However, measurements to ensure compliance with OELs have decreased significantly and the question is to what extent the OELs still perform their function, and through which mechanisms. By performing interviews at a number of different workplaces in Sweden, that handle chemicals, we will try to identify regulatory, social and organizational factors that influence the risk perception and communication at workplaces and also investigate the role played by OELs in these processes. Previous research on risk management at the workplace has often been focused on physical risks or accident prevention. We believe that the management, communication and perception of chemical risks differ significantly in their nature from most physical risks, since exposures to harmful chemicals generally lead to delayed and unpredictable effects and individuals tend to estimate risks with delayed effects lower than if the consequences are immediate.

  • 36.
    Shi, Jingwen
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Yolanda
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lundin, Maria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Karlsson, Hanna
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Möller, Lennart
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hemolysis of silica particles: Importance of surface properties and plasma corona2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S203-S203Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37. Stockmann-Juvala, Helene
    et al.
    Zitting, Antti
    Darrie, Grant
    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Corrosion Science (closed 20081231).
    Santonen, Tiina
    Read-across approach in the risk assessment of ferrochromium. Case: Repeated dose toxicity2009In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 189, p. S245-S245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Exploring the Human Protein Atlas in the field of toxicology2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S2-S2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Wandall, Birgitte
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Values in science and risk assessment2004In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 152, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely accepted claim that scientific practice contains value judgments, i.e. decisions made on the basis of values. This paper clarifies the concepts involved in this claim and explains its implications for risk assessment. It is explained why values are necessarily a part of science and of risk assessment. A certain type of values that contribute to the aim of science, so-called epistemic values, are identified as rationally justified as basis for judgment in science. It is argued that the aims of pure science and risk assessment differ in some aspects and that consequently pure science's epistemic values are not sufficient for risk assessment. I suggest how the epistemic values may be supplemented in order to align better with the aim of risk assessment. It is concluded that since risk assessment is no less value-laden than pure science, it is important (a) that risk assessors become aware of what values they are (often implicitly) relying on, (b) that the values are justifiable, and (c) that transparency is ensured, i.e. that the values and value-based assumptions applied in particular risk assessments are explicitly acknowledged.

  • 40.
    Ågerstrand, Marlene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Hansson, Sven Ove
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Regulatory perspectives on pharmaceuticals in the environment2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, p. S31-S31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ågerstrand, Marlene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Rudén, Christina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    Wester, Misse
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, Philosophy.
    The Swedish environmental information and classification scheme for pharmaceuticals - An empirical investigation of the motivations, intentions and expectations underlying its development and implementation2008In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 180, p. S177-S178Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 41 of 41
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