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  • 1. Abbott, B.P.
    et al.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Li, Liang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Rosswog, S
    et al.,
    SUPPLEMENT: "LOCALIZATION AND BROADBAND FOLLOW-UP OF THE GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE TRANSIENT GW150914" (2016, ApJL, 826, L13)2016In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 225, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Supplement provides supporting material for Abbott et al. (2016a). We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. We compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  • 2. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Agudo, I.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Aller, H. D.
    Aller, M. F.
    Antolini, E.
    Arkharov, A. A.
    Axelsson, M.
    Bach, U.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berdyugin, A.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Blinov, D. A.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Boettcher, M.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buemi, C. S.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carosati, D.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chen, W. P.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Corbel, S.
    Costamante, L.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Donato, D.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Forne, E.
    Fortin, P.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gurwell, M. A.
    Gusbar, C.
    Gomez, J. L.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hagen-Thorn, V. A.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kimeridze, G.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Konstantinova, T. S.
    Kopatskaya, E. N.
    Koptelova, E.
    Kovalev, Y. Y.
    Kurtanidze, O. M.
    Kuss, M.
    Lahteenmaki, A.
    Lande, J.
    Larionov, V. M.
    Larionova, E. G.
    Larionova, L. V.
    Larsson, S.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Leto, P.
    Lister, M. L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Massaro, E.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    McHardy, I. M.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morozova, D. A.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nikolashvili, M. G.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pasanen, M.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Pushkarev, A. B.
    Raino, S.
    Raiteri, C. M.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reinthal, R.
    Ripken, J.
    Ritz, S.
    Roca-Sogorb, M.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Roth, M.
    Roustazadeh, P.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Sigua, L. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Sokolovsky, K.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Takalo, L. O.
    Tanaka, T.
    Taylor, B.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tornikoski, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Trigilio, C.
    Troitsky, I. S.
    Umana, G.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Villata, M.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    FERMI Large Area Telescope and multi-wavelength observations of the flaring activity of PKS 1510-089 between 2008 september and 2009 june2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 721, no 2, p. 1425-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the multi-wavelength observations of PKS 1510-089 (a flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) at z = 0.361) during its high activity period between 2008 September and 2009 June. During this 11 month period, the source was characterized by a complex variability at optical, UV, and gamma-ray bands, on timescales down to 6-12 hr. The brightest gamma-ray isotropic luminosity, recorded on 2009 March 26, was similar or equal to 2 x 1048 erg s-1. The spectrum in the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range shows a mild curvature described well by a log-parabolic law, and can be understood as due to the Klein-Nishina effect. The. -ray flux has a complex correlation with the other wavelengths. There is no correlation at all with the X-ray band, a weak correlation with the UV, and a significant correlation with the optical flux. The. -ray flux seems to lead the optical one by about 13 days. From the UV photometry, we estimated a black hole mass of similar or equal to 5.4 x 10(8)M(circle dot) and an accretion rate of similar or equal to 0.5M(circle dot) yr(-1). Although the power in the thermal and non-thermal outputs is smaller compared to the very luminous and distant FSRQs, PKS 1510-089 exhibits a quite large Compton dominance and a prominent big blue bump (BBB) as observed in the most powerful gamma-ray quasars. The BBB was still prominent during the historical maximum optical state in 2009 May, but the optical/ UV spectral index was softer than in the quiescent state. This seems to indicate that the BBB was not completely dominated by the synchrotron emission during the highest optical state. We model the broadband spectrum assuming a leptonic scenario in which the inverse Compton emission is dominated by the scattering of soft photons produced externally to the jet. The resulting model-dependent jet energetic content is compatible with a scenario in which the jet is powered by the accretion disk, with a total efficiency within the Kerr black hole limit.

  • 3. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Agudo, I.
    Ajello, M.
    Aller, H. D.
    Aller, M. F.
    Angelakis, E.
    Arkharov, A. A.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Bach, U.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Benitez, E.
    Berdyugin, A.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Boettcher, M.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Burrows, D.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Calzoletti, L.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Capalbi, M.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carosati, D.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Charles, E.
    Chaty, S.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chen, W. P.
    Chiang, J.
    Chincarini, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Colafrancesco, S.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cutini, S.
    D'ammando, F.
    Deitrick, R.
    D'Elia, V.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    Donnarumma, I.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dultzin, D.
    Dumora, D.
    Falcone, A.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Forne, E.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fuhrmann, L.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gomez, J. L.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giuliani, A.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Gronwall, C.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gurwell, M. A.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Healey, S. E.
    Heidt, J.
    Hiriart, D.
    Horan, D.
    Hoversten, E. A.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Jorstad, S. G.
    Kadler, M.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kennea, J.
    Kerr, M.
    Kimeridze, G.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kocian, M. L.
    Kopatskaya, E. N.
    Koptelova, E.
    Konstantinova, T. S.
    Kovalev, Y. Y.
    Kovalev, Yu. A.
    Kurtanidze, O. M.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larionov, V. M.
    Latronico, L.
    Leto, P.
    Lindfors, E.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Marchegiani, P.
    Marscher, A. P.
    Marshall, F.
    Max-Moerbeck, W.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nestoras, I.
    Nilsson, K.
    Nizhelsky, N. A.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Ojha, R.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Osborne, J.
    Ozaki, M.
    Pacciani, L.
    Padovani, P.
    Pagani, C.
    Page, K.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pasanen, M.
    Pavlidou, V.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Perri, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piranomonte, S.
    Piron, F.
    Pittori, C.
    Porter, T. A.
    Puccetti, S.
    Rahoui, F.
    Raino, S.
    Raiteri, C.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Richards, J. L.
    Ritz, S.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Ros, J. A.
    Roth, M.
    Roustazadeh, P.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sadun, A.
    Sanchez, D.
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sellerholm, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Sigua, L. A.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Stevenson, M.
    Stratta, G.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Takalo, L. O.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Verrecchia, F.
    Vilchez, N.
    Villata, M.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Zensus, J. A.
    Zhekanis, G. V.
    Ziegler, M.
    The spectral energy distribution of fermi bright blazars2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 716, no 1, p. 30-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray/gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log nu-log nu F-nu representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low-and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(ro), and optical to X-ray, alpha(ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (nu(S)(peak)) is positioned between 10(12.5) and 10(14.5) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(13) and 10(17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than 50% of known radio bright high energy peaked (HBL) BL Lacs are detected in the LBAS sample, only less than 13% of known bright FSRQs and LBL BL Lacs are included. This suggests that the latter sources, as a class, may be much fainter gamma-ray emitters than LBAS blazars, and could in fact radiate close to the expectations of simple SSC models. We categorized all our sources according to a new physical classification scheme based on the generally accepted paradigm for Active Galactic Nuclei and on the results of this SED study. Since the LAT detector is more sensitive to flat spectrum gamma-ray sources, the correlation between nu(S)(peak) and gamma-ray spectral index strongly favors the detection of high energy peaked blazars, thus explaining the Fermi overabundance of this type of sources compared to radio and EGRET samples. This selection effect is similar to that experienced in the soft X-ray band where HBL BL Lacs are the dominant type of blazars.

  • 4. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Amin, M. A.
    Baldini, L.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Buehler, R.
    Bulmash, D.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Chiaro, G.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Corbet, R. H. D.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Finke, J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Inoue, Y.
    Jackson, Miranda S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics. Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Sweden.
    Jogler, T.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Kamae, T.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, S.
    Latronico, L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nemmen, R.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Paneque, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reyes, L. C.
    Ritz, S.
    Romoli, C.
    Roth, M.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takeuchi, Y.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Tronconi, V.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Werner, M.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Gamma-ray flaring activity from the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211 observed by Fermi LAT2015In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 799, no 2, article id 143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Large Area Telescope ( LAT) on board the FermiGamma- ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV- peaked flat- spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830- 211 ( z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic. - ray luminosity ( E > 100 MeV), averaged over 3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/ 15 at 2.9 x 1050 erg s- 1, makes it among the brightest high- redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time- delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large. - ray flares of PKS 1830- 211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the. - ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X- ray flux with the. - ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and. - ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy- dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  • 5. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Antolini, E.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bogart, J. R.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Cannon, A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Celotti, A.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chen, A. W.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cotter, G.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Elia, V.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    De Rosa, A.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Escande, L.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grandi, P.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Healey, S. E.
    Hill, A. B.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Iafrate, G.
    Itoh, R.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, R. P.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lavalley, C.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Malaguti, G.
    Massaro, E.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    McGlynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piranomonte, S.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ripken, J.
    Ritz, S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sanchez, D.
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Stawarz, L.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Taylor, G. B.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Ubertini, P.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Villata, M.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wallace, E.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    The first catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi large area telescope2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 715, no 1, p. 429-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the first catalog of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), corresponding to 11 months of data collected in scientific operation mode. The First LAT AGN Catalog (1LAC) includes 671 gamma-ray sources located at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 10 degrees) that are detected with a test statistic greater than 25 and associated statistically with AGNs. Some LAT sources are associated with multiple AGNs, and consequently, the catalog includes 709 AGNs, comprising 300 BL Lacertae objects, 296 flat-spectrum radio quasars, 41 AGNs of other types, and 72 AGNs of unknown type. We also classify the blazars based on their spectral energy distributions as archival radio, optical, and X-ray data permit. In addition to the formal 1LAC sample, we provide AGN associations for 51 low-latitude LAT sources and AGN "affiliations" (unquantified counterpart candidates) for 104 high-latitude LAT sources without AGN associations. The overlap of the 1LAC with existing gamma-ray AGN catalogs (LBAS, EGRET, AGILE, Swift, INTEGRAL, TeVCat) is briefly discussed. Various properties-such as gamma-ray fluxes and photon power-law spectral indices, redshifts, gamma-ray luminosities, variability, and archival radio luminosities-and their correlations are presented and discussed for the different blazar classes. We compare the 1LAC results with predictions regarding the gamma-ray AGN populations, and we comment on the power of the sample to address the question of the blazar sequence.

  • 6. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Asano, K.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Camilo, F.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    den Hartog, P. R.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Luca, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Dormody, M.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Gotthelf, E. V.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Hobbs, G.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Johnston, S.
    Kamae, T.
    Kanai, Y.
    Kanbach, G.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Keith, M.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Manchester, R. N.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Rea, N.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Thorsett, S. E.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Venter, C.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Weltevrede, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Detection of the energetic pulsar PSR B1509-58 and its pulsar wind nebula in MSH 15-52 using the Fermi-large area telescope2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 714, no 1, p. 927-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the young and energetic pulsar PSR B1509-58 and its pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the composite supernova remnant G320.4-1.2 (aka MSH 15-52). Using 1 yr of survey data with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT), we detected pulsations from PSR B1509-58 up to 1 GeV and extended gamma-ray emission above 1 GeV spatially coincident with the PWN. The pulsar light curve presents two peaks offset from the radio peak by phases 0.96 +/- 0.01 and 0.33 +/- 0.02. New constraining upper limits on the pulsar emission are derived below 1 GeV and confirm a severe spectral break at a few tens of MeV. The nebular spectrum in the 1-100 GeV energy range is well described by a power law with a spectral index of (1.57 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.13) and a flux above 1 GeV of (2.91 +/- 0.79 +/- 1.35) x 10(-9) cm(-2) s(-1). The first errors represent the statistical errors on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. The LAT spectrum of the nebula connects nicely with Cherenkov observations, and indicates a spectral break between GeV and TeV energies.

  • 7. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Luca, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Dormody, M.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giavitto, G.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Hobbs, G.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, Miranda S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Manchester, R. N.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    McGlynn, Sinead
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Noutsos, A.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Ray, P. S.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ritz, S.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Usher, T. L.
    Van Etten, A.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Venter, C.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Watters, K.
    Weltevrede, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    THE VELA PULSAR: RESULTS FROM THE FIRST YEAR OF FERMI LAT OBSERVATIONS2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 713, no 1, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on analysis of timing and spectroscopy of the Vela pulsar using 11 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The intrinsic brightness of Vela at GeV energies combined with the angular resolution and sensitivity of the LAT allows us to make the most detailed study to date of the energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectra, using a LAT-derived timing model. The light curve consists of two peaks (P1 and P2) connected by bridge emission containing a third peak (P3). We have confirmed the strong decrease of the P1/P2 ratio with increasing energy seen with EGRET and previous Fermi LAT data, and observe that P1 disappears above 20 GeV. The increase with energy of the mean phase of the P3 component can be followed with much greater detail, showing that P3 and P2 are present up to the highest energies of pulsation. We find significant pulsed emission at phases outside the main profile, indicating that magnetospheric emission exists over 80% of the pulsar period. With increased high-energy counts the phase-averaged spectrum is seen to depart from a power law with simple exponential cutoff, and is better fit with a more gradual cutoff. The spectra in fixed-count phase bins are well fit with power laws with exponential cutoffs, revealing a strong and complex phase dependence of the cutoff energy, especially in the peaks. By combining these results with predictions of the outer magnetosphere models that map emission characteristics to phase, it will be possible to probe the particle acceleration and the structure of the pulsar magnetosphere with unprecedented detail.

  • 8. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fukui, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rodriguez, Y.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Uehara, T.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yamamoto, H.
    Yamazaki, R.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT W28 (G6.4-0.1)2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 718, no 1, p. 348-356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present detailed analysis of two gamma-ray sources, 1FGL J1801.3-2322c and 1FGL J1800.5-2359c, that have been found toward the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. 1FGL J1801.3-2322c is found to be an extended source within the boundary of SNR W28, and to extensively overlap with the TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1801-233, which is associated with a dense molecular cloud interacting with the SNR. The gamma-ray spectrum measured with the LAT from 0.2 to 100 GeV can be described by a broken power-law function with a break at similar to 1 GeV and photon indices of 2.09 +/- 0.08 (stat) +/- 0.28 (sys) below the break and 2.74 +/- 0.06 (stat) +/- 0.09 (sys) above the break. Given the clear association between HESS J1801-233 and the shocked molecular cloud and a smoothly connected spectrum in the GeV-TeV band, we consider the origin of the gamma-ray emission in both GeV and TeV ranges to be the interaction between particles accelerated in the SNR and the molecular cloud. The decay of neutral pions produced in interactions between accelerated hadrons and dense molecular gas provides a reasonable explanation for the broadband gamma-ray spectrum. 1FGL J1800.5-2359c, located outside the southern boundary of SNR W28, cannot be resolved. An upper limit on the size of the gamma-ray emission was estimated to be similar to 16' using events above similar to 2 GeV under the assumption of a circular shape with uniform surface brightness. It appears to coincide with the TeV source HESS J1800-240B, which is considered to be associated with a dense molecular cloud that contains the ultra compact H II region W28A2 (G5.89-0.39). We found no significant gamma-ray emission in the LAT energy band at the positions of TeV sources HESS J1800-230A and HESS J1800-230C. The LAT data for HESS J1800-230A combined with the TeV data points indicate a spectral break between 10 GeV and 100 GeV.

  • 9. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Chaty, S.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Hill, A. B.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Livingstone, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wallace, E.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi large area telescope observation of a gamma-ray source at the position of Eta Carinae2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 723, no 1, p. 649-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected a gamma-ray source that is spatially consistent with the location of Eta Carinae. This source has been persistently bright since the beginning of the LAT survey observations (from 2008 August to 2009 July, the time interval considered here). The gamma-ray signal is detected significantly throughout the LAT energy band (i.e., up to similar to 100 GeV). The 0.1-100 GeV energy spectrum is well represented by a combination of a cutoff power-law model (<10 GeV) and a hard power-law component (>10 GeV). The total flux (>100 MeV) is 3.7(-0.1)(+0.3) x 10(-7) photons s(-1) cm(-2), with additional systematic uncertainties of 10%, and consistent with the average flux measured by AGILE. The light curve obtained by Fermi is consistent with steady emission. Our observations do not confirm the presence of a gamma-ray flare in 2008 October, as reported by Tavani et al., although we cannot exclude that a flare lasting only a few hours escaped detection by the Fermi LAT. We also do not find any evidence for gamma-ray variability that correlates with the large X-ray variability of Eta Carinae observed during 2008 December and 2009 January. We are thus not able to establish an unambiguous identification of the LAT source with Eta Carinae.

  • 10. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    et al,
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA-X PULSAR WIND NEBULA2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 713, no 1, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on gamma-ray observations in the off-pulse window of the Vela pulsar PSR B0833-45 using 11 months of survey data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This pulsar is located in the 8 degrees diameter Vela supernova remnant, which contains several regions of non-thermal emission detected in the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The gamma-ray emission detected by the LAT lies within one of these regions, the 2 degrees x 3 degrees area south of the pulsar known as Vela-X. The LAT flux is significantly spatially extended with a best-fit radius of 0.degrees 88 +/- 0.degrees 12 for an assumed radially symmetric uniform disk. The 200 MeV to 20 GeV LAT spectrum of this source is well described by a power law with a spectral index of 2.41 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.15 and integral flux above 100 MeV of (4.73 +/- 0.63 +/- 1.32) x 10(-7) cm(-2) s(-1). The first errors represent the statistical error on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. Detailed morphological and spectral analyses give strong constraints on the energetics and magnetic field of the pulsar wind nebula system and favor a scenario with two distinct electron populations.

  • 11. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Allafort, A.
    McGlynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    et al.,
    DISCOVERY OF PULSED gamma-RAYS FROM PSR J0034-0534 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE: A CASE FOR CO-LOCATED RADIO AND gamma-RAY EMISSION REGIONS2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 712, no 2, p. 957-963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have been firmly established as a class of gamma-ray emitters via the detection of pulsations above 0.1 GeV from eight MSPs by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Using 13 months of LAT data, significant gamma-ray pulsations at the radio period have been detected from the MSP PSR J0034-0534, making it the ninth clear MSP detection by the LAT. The gamma-ray light curve shows two peaks separated by 0.274 +/- 0.015 in phase which are very nearly aligned with the radio peaks, a phenomenon seen only in the Crab pulsar until now. The >= 0.1 GeV spectrum of this pulsar is well fit by an exponentially cutoff power law with a cutoff energy of 1.8 +/- 0.6 +/- 0.1 GeV and a photon index of 1.5 +/- 0.2 +/- 0.1, first errors are statistical and second are systematic. The near-alignment of the radio and gamma-ray peaks strongly suggests that the radio and gamma-ray emission regions are co-located and both are the result of caustic formation.

  • 12. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Antolini, E.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chen, A. W.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Colafrancesco, S.
    Conrad, J.
    Cutini, S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Focke, W. B.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grandi, P.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Jackson, Miranda S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    McGlynn, Sinead
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nestoras, I.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reyes, L. C.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sambruna, R.
    Sander, A.
    Sato, R.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, L.
    Stecker, F. W.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Villata, M.
    Vitale, V.
    von Kienlin, A.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Tavecchio, F.
    Sikora, M.
    Schady, P.
    Roming, P.
    Chester, M. M.
    Maraschi, L.
    SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF LUMINOUS QUASARS: REVEALING THE NATURE OF HIGH-ENERGY BLAZAR EMISSION IN LOW-LEVEL ACTIVITY STATES2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 716, no 1, p. 835-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the results from the Suzaku X-ray observations of five flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), namely PKS 0208-512, Q 0827+243, PKS 1127-145, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3. All these sources were additionally monitored simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously by the Fermi satellite in gamma rays and the Swift UVOT in the UV and optical bands, respectively. We constructed their broadband spectra covering the frequency range from 10(14) Hz up to 10(25) Hz, and those reveal the nature of high-energy emission of luminous blazars in their low-activity states. The analyzed X-ray spectra are well fitted by a power-law model with photoelectric absorption. In the case of PKS 0208-512, PKS 1127-145, and 3C 454.3, the X-ray continuum showed indication of hardening at low energies. Moreover, when compared with the previous X-ray observations, we see a significantly increasing contribution of low-energy photons to the total X-ray fluxes when the sources are getting fainter. The same behavior can be noted in the Suzaku data alone. A likely explanation involves a variable, flat-spectrum component produced via inverse-Compton emission, plus an additional, possibly steady soft X-ray component prominent when the source gets fainter. This soft X-ray excess is represented either by a steep power-law (photon indices Gamma similar to 3-5) or a blackbody-type emission with temperatures kT similar to 0.1-0.2 keV. We model the broadband spectra of the five observed FSRQs using synchrotron self-Compton and/or external-Compton radiation models. Our modeling suggests that the difference between the low-and high-activity states in luminous blazars is due to the different total kinetic power of the jet, most likely related to varying bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow within the blazar emission zone.

  • 13. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Antolini, E.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cutini, S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Healey, S. E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lurrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzan, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Ritz, S.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Strong, A. W.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    The Fermi-LAT high-latitude survey: Source count distributions and the origin of the extragalactic diffuse background2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 720, no 1, p. 435-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first of a series of papers aimed at characterizing the populations detected in the high-latitude sky of the Fermi-LAT survey. In this work, we focus on the intrinsic spectral and flux properties of the source sample. We show that when selection effects are properly taken into account, Fermi sources are on average steeper than previously found (e.g., in the bright source list) with an average photon index of 2.40 +/- 0.02 over the entire 0.1-100 GeV energy band. We confirm that flat spectrum radio quasars have steeper spectra than BL Lacertae objects with an average index of 2.48 +/- 0.02 versus 2.18 +/- 0.02. Using several methods, we build the deepest source count distribution at GeV energies, deriving that the intrinsic source (i.e., blazar) surface density at F-100 >= 10(-9) ph cm(2) s(-1) is 0.12(-0.02)(+0.03) deg(-2). The integration of the source count distribution yields that point sources contribute 16(+/- 1.8)% (+/- 7% systematic uncertainty) of the GeV isotropic diffuse background. At the fluxes currently reached by LAT, we can rule out the hypothesis that pointlike sources (i.e., blazars) produce a larger fraction of the diffuse emission.

  • 14. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Antolini, E.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cutini, S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Healey, S. E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, S.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Massaro, E.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Mueller, M.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Ritz, S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wallace, E.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Gamma-ray light curves and variability of bright fermi-detected blazars2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 722, no 1, p. 520-542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f(alpha) PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)-measured for a few blazars showing strong activity-complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the brightest gamma-ray blazars.

  • 15. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Asano, K.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    McGlynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    Fermi detection of delayed GeV emission from the short gamma-ray burst 081024B2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 712, no 1, p. 558-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the detailed analysis of the high-energy extended emission from the short gamma-ray burst (GRB) 081024B detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Historically, this represents the first clear detection of temporal extended emission from a short GRB. The light curve observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor lasts approximately 0.8 s whereas the emission in the Fermi Large Area Telescope lasts for about 3 s. Evidence of longer lasting high-energy emission associated with long bursts has been already reported by previous experiments. Our observations, together with the earlier reported study of the bright short GRB 090510, indicate similarities in the high-energy emission of short and long GRBs and open the path to new interpretations.

  • 16. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Asano, K.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Pushkarev, A. B.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM NGC 12752009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 699, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery of high-energy (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from NGC 1275, a giant elliptical galaxy lying at the center of the Perseus cluster of galaxies, based on observations made with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The positional center of the gamma-ray source is only approximate to 3' away from the NGC 1275 nucleus, well within the 95% LAT error circle of approximate to 5'. The spatial distribution of gamma-ay photons is consistent with a point source. The average flux and power-law photon index measured with the LAT from 2008 August 4 to 2008 December 5 are F-gamma = (2.10 +/- 0.23) x 10(-7) ph (>100 MeV) cm(-2) s(-1) and Gamma = 2.17 +/- 0.05, respectively. The measurements are statistically consistent with constant flux during the four-month LAT observing period. Previous EGRET observations gave an upper limit of F-gamma < 3.72 x 10(-8) ph (>100 MeV) cm(-2) s(-1) to the gamma-ray flux from NGC 1275. This indicates that the source is variable on timescales of years to decades, and therefore restricts the fraction of emission that can be produced in extended regions of the galaxy cluster. Contemporaneous and historical radio observations are also reported. The broadband spectrum of NGC 1275 is modeled with a simple one-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model and a model with a decelerating jet flow.

  • 17. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwoo, W. B.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bottacini, E.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Cutini, S.
    D'Ammando, F.
    De Angelis, A.
    De Palma, F.
    Dermer, C. D.
    Digel, S. W.
    Do Couto E Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Dubois, R.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Gomez-Vargas, G. A.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hays, E.
    Hill, A. B.
    Horan, D.
    Hou, X.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Iafrate, G.
    Jackson, Miranda S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Jóhannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Knödlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Larsson, S.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orienti, M.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Pivato, G.
    Poon, H.
    Porter, T. A.
    Prokhorov, D.
    Rainò, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sanchez, D. A.
    Sbarra, C.
    Schalk, T. L.
    Sgrò, C.
    Share, G. H.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, Ł.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tinivella, M.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Troja, E.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vianello, G.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, D. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Zimmer, S.
    Fermi observations of γ-ray emission from the moon2012In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 758, no 2, p. 140-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the detection of high-energy γ-ray emission from the Moon during the first 24 months of observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). This emission comes from particle cascades produced by cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei and electrons interacting with the lunar surface. The differential spectrum of the Moon is soft and can be described as a log-parabolic function with an effective cutoff at 2-3GeV, while the average integral flux measured with the LAT from the beginning of observations in 2008 August to the end of 2010 August is F(&gt;cm -2s -1. This flux is about a factor 2-3 higher than that observed between 1991 and 1994 by the EGRET experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, F(&gt;100 MeV) ≈ 5 × 10 -7cm -2s -1, when solar activity was relatively high. The higher γ-ray flux measured by Fermi is consistent with the deep solar minimum conditions during the first 24 months of the mission, which reduced effects of heliospheric modulation, and thus increased the heliospheric flux of Galactic CRs. A detailed comparison of the light curve with McMurdo Neutron Monitor rates suggests a correlation of the trends. The Moon and the Sun are so far the only known bright emitters of γ-rays with fast celestial motion. Their paths across the sky are projected onto the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes as well as onto other areas crowded with high-energy γ-ray sources. Analysis of the lunar and solar emission may thus be important for studies of weak and transient sources near the ecliptic.

  • 18. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, B.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Belfiore, A.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Camilo, F.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Luca, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    Dormody, M.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Edmonds, Y.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giavitto, G.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gwon, C.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, R. P.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Kanai, Y.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Pierbattista, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Ransom, S. M.
    Ray, P. S.
    Razzano, M.
    Rea, N.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Thorsett, S. E.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Usher, T. L.
    Van Etten, A.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Venter, C.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Watters, K.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wolff, M. T.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi large area telescope observations of PSR J1836+59252010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 712, no 2, p. 1209-1218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of the gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1836+5925, powering the formerly unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1835+5918, was one of the early accomplishments of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Sitting 25 degrees off the Galactic plane, PSR J1836+5925 is a 173 ms pulsar with a characteristic age of 1.8 million years, a spindown luminosity of 1.1 x 10(34) erg s(-1), and a large off-peak (OP) emission component, making it quite unusual among the known gamma-ray pulsar population. We present an analysis of one year of LAT data, including an updated timing solution, detailed spectral results, and a long-term light curve showing no indication of variability. No evidence for a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen and the spectral characteristics of the OP emission indicate it is likely magnetospheric. Analysis of recent XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray counterpart yields a detailed characterization of its spectrum, which, like Geminga, is consistent with that of a neutron star showing evidence for both magnetospheric and thermal emission.

  • 19. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    Fermi large area telescope observations of the crab pulsar and nebula2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 708, no 2, p. 1254-1267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on gamma-ray observations of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula using 8 months of survey data with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The high quality light curve obtained using the ephemeris provided by the Nancay and Jodrell Bank radio telescopes shows two main peaks stable in phase with energy. The first gamma-ray peak leads the radio main pulse by (281 +/- 12 +/- 21) mu s, giving new constraints on the production site of non-thermal emission in pulsar magnetospheres. The first uncertainty is due to gamma-ray statistics, and the second arises from the rotation parameters. The improved sensitivity and the unprecedented statistics afforded by the LAT enable precise measurement of the Crab Pulsar spectral parameters: cut-off energy at E-c = (5.8 +/- 0.5 +/- 1.2) GeV, spectral index of Gamma = (1.97 +/- 0.02 +/- 0.06) and integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (2.09 +/- 0.03 +/- 0.18) x 10(-6) cm(-2) s(-1). The first errors represent the statistical error on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. Pulsed gamma-ray photons are observed up to similar to 20 GeV which precludes emission near the stellar surface, below altitudes of around 4-5 stellar radii in phase intervals encompassing the two main peaks. A detailed phase-resolved spectral analysis is also performed: the hardest emission from the Crab Pulsar comes from the bridge region between the two gamma-ray peaks while the softest comes from the falling edge of the second peak. The spectrum of the nebula in the energy range 100 MeV-300 GeV is well described by the sum of two power laws of indices Gamma(sync) = (3.99 +/- 0.12 +/- 0.08) and Gamma(IC) = (1.64 +/- 0.05 +/- 0.07), corresponding to the falling edge of the synchrotron and the rising edge of the inverse Compton (IC) components, respectively. This latter, which links up naturally with the spectral data points of Cherenkov experiments, is well reproduced via IC scattering from standard magnetohydrodynamic nebula models, and does not require any additional radiation mechanism.

  • 20. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF TeV-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 707, no 2, p. 1310-1333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on observations of TeV-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) made during the first 5.5 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). In total, 96 AGNs were selected for study, each being either (1) a source detected at TeV energies (28 sources) or (2) an object that has been studied with TeV instruments and for which an upper limit has been reported (68 objects). The Fermi observations show clear detections of 38 of these TeV-selected objects, of which 21 are joint GeV-TeV sources, and 29 were not in the third EGRET catalog. For each of the 38 Fermi-detected sources, spectra and light curves are presented. Most can be described with a power law of spectral index harder than 2.0, with a spectral break generally required to accommodate the TeV measurements. Based on an extrapolation of the Fermi spectrum, we identify sources, not previously detected at TeV energies, which are promising targets for TeV instruments. Evidence for systematic evolution of the gamma-ray spectrum with redshift is presented and discussed in the context of interaction with the extragalactic background light.

  • 21. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY DETECTION OF THE RADIO GALAXY M872009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 707, no 1, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovery of high-energy (MeV/GeV) gamma-ray emission positionally consistent with the center of the radio galaxy M87, at a source significance of over 10 sigma in 10 months of all-sky survey data. Following the detections of Cen A and Per A, this makes M87 the third radio galaxy seen with the LAT. The faint point-like gamma-ray source has a >100 MeV flux of 2.45 (+/-0.63) x 10(-8) photons cm(-2) s(-1) (photon index = 2.26 +/- 0.13) with no significant variability detected within the LAT observation. This flux is comparable with the previous EGRET upper limit (<2.18 x 10-8 photons cm(-2) s(-1), 2 sigma), thus there is no evidence for a significant MeV/GeV flare on decade timescales. Contemporaneous Chandra and Very Long Baseline Array data indicate low activity in the unresolved X-ray and radio core relative to previous observations, suggesting M87 is in a quiescent overall level over the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. The LAT gamma-ray spectrum is modeled as synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission from the electron population producing the radio-to-X-ray emission in the core. The resultant SSC spectrum extrapolates smoothly from the LAT band to the historical-minimum TeV emission. Alternative models for the core and possible contributions from the kiloparsec-scale jet in M87 are considered, and cannot be excluded.

  • 22. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Yamashita, T.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    et al.,
    PKS 1502+106: A new and distant gamma-ray blazar in outburst discovered by the fermi large area telescope2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 710, no 1, p. 810-827Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope discovered a rapid (similar to 5 days duration), high-energy (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray outburst from a source identified with the blazar PKS 1502+106 (OR 103, S3 1502+10, z = 1.839) starting on 2008 August 5 (similar to 23 UTC, MJD 54683.95), and followed by bright and variable flux over the next few months. Results on the gamma-ray localization and identification, as well as spectral and temporal behavior during the first months of the Fermi all-sky survey, are reported here in conjunction with a multiwaveband characterization as a result of one of the first Fermi multifrequency campaigns. The campaign included a Swift ToO (followed up by a 16 day observation on August 7-22, MJD 54685-54700), VLBA (within the MOJAVE program), Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) 40 m, Effelsberg-100 m, Metsahovi-14 m, RATAN-600, and Kanata-Hiroshima radio/optical observations. Results from the analysis of archival observations by INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton, and Spitzer space telescopes are reported for a more complete picture of this new gamma-ray blazar. PKS 1502+106 is a sub-GeV peaked, powerful flat spectrum radio quasar (luminosity at E > 100 MeV, L-gamma, is about 1.1 x 10(49) erg s(-1), and black hole mass likely close to 10(9) M-circle dot), exhibiting marked gamma-ray bolometric dominance, in particular during the asymmetric outburst (L-gamma/L-opt similar to 100, and 5 day averaged flux F-E > 100MeV = 2.91 +/- 1.4 x 10(-6) ph cm(-2) s(-1)), which was characterized by a factor greater than 3 of flux increase in less than 12 hr. The outburst was observed simultaneously from optical to X-ray bands (F0.3-10keV = 2.18(-0.12)(+0.15) x 10(-12) erg cm(-2) s(-1), and hard photon index similar to 1.5, similar to past values) with a flux increase of less than 1 order of magnitude with respect to past observations, and was likely controlled by Comptonization of external-jet photons produced in the broad-line region (BLR) in the gamma-ray band. No evidence of a possible blue bump signature was observed in the optical-UV continuum spectrum, while some hints for a possible 4 day time lag with respect to the gamma-ray flare were found. Nonetheless, the properties of PKS 1502+106 and the strict optical/UV, X-, and gamma-ray cross-correlations suggest the contribution of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC), in-jet, process should dominate from radio to X- rays. This mechanism may also be responsible for the consistent gamma-ray variability observed by the LAT on longer timescales, after the ignition of activity at these energies provided by the BLR-dissipated outburst. Modulations and subsequent minor, rapid flare events were detected, with a general fluctuation mode between pink-noise and a random-walk. The averaged gamma-ray spectrum showed a deviation from a simple power law, and can be described by a log-parabola curved model peaking around 0.4-0.5 GeV. The maximum energy of photons detected from the source in the first four months of LAT observations was 15.8 GeV, with no significant consequences on extragalactic background light predictions. A possible radio counterpart of the gamma-ray outburst can be assumed only if a delay of more than three months is considered on the basis of opacity effects at cm and longer wavelengths. The rotation of the electric vector position angle observed by VLBA from 2007 to 2008 could represent a slow field odering and alignment with respect to the jet axis, likely a precursor feature of the ejection of a superluminal radio knot and the high-energy outburst. This observing campaign provides more insight into the connection between MeV-GeV flares and the moving, polarized structures observed by the VLBI.

  • 23. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Conrad, Jan
    FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF THE VERY HARD GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PG 1553+1132010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 708, no 2, p. 1310-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the observations of PG 1553+113 during the first similar to 200 days of Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope science operations, from 2008 August 4 to 2009 February 22 (MJD 54682.7-54884.2). This is the first detailed study of PG 1553+113 in the GeV gamma-ray regime and it allows us to fill a gap of three decades in energy in its spectral energy distribution (SED). We find PG 1553+113 to be a steady source with a hard spectrum that is best fit by a simple power law in the Fermi energy band. We combine the Fermi data with archival radio, optical, X-ray, and very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray data to model its broadband SED and find that a simple, one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model provides a reasonable fit. PG 1553+113 has the softest VHE spectrum of all sources detected in that regime and, out of those with significant detections across the Fermi energy bandpass so far, the hardest spectrum in that energy regime. Thus, it has the largest spectral break of any gamma-ray source studied to date, which could be due to the absorption of the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum by the extragalactic background light (EBL). Assuming this to be the case, we selected a model with a low level of EBL and used it to absorb the power-law spectrum from PG 1553+113 measured with Fermi (200 MeV-157 GeV) to find the redshift, which gave the best fit to the measured VHE data (90 GeV-1.1 TeV) for this parameterization of the EBL. We show that this redshift can be considered an upper limit on the distance to PG 1553+113.

  • 24. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DETECTION OF PULSED gamma-RAYS FROM THE VELA-LIKE PULSARS PSR J1048-5832 AND PSR J2229+61142009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 706, no 2, p. 1331-1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the detection of gamma-ray pulsations (>= 0.1GeV) from PSR J2229+ 6114 and PSR J1048-5832, the latter having been detected as a low-significance pulsar by EGRET. Data in the gamma-ray band were acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, while the radio rotational ephemerides used to fold the gamma-ray light curves were obtained using the Green Bank Telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, and the Parkes Telescope. The two young radio pulsars, located within the error circles of the previously unidentified EGRET sources 3EG J1048-5840 and 3EG J2227+6122, present spin-down characteristics similar to the Vela pulsar. PSR J1048-5832 shows two sharp peaks at phases 0.15 +/- 0.01 and 0.57 +/- 0.01 relative to the radio pulse confirming the EGRET light curve, while PSR J2229+ 6114 presents a very broad peak at phase 0.49 +/- 0.01. The gamma-ray spectra above 0.1 GeV of both pulsars are fit with power laws having exponential cutoffs near 3 GeV, leading to integral photon fluxes of (2.19 +/- 0.22 +/- 0.32) x 10(-7) cm(-2) s(-1) for PSR J1048-5832 and (3.77 +/- 0.22 +/- 0.44) x 10(-7) cm(-2) s(-1) for PSR J2229+6114. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. PSR J1048-5832 is one of the two LAT sources whichwere entangled together as 3EG J1048-5840. These detections add to the growing number of young gamma-ray pulsars that make up the dominant population of GeV gamma-ray sources in the Galactic plane.

  • 25. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Cannon, A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Colafrancesco, S.
    Cominsky, L. R.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Davis, D. S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Falcone, A.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Finke, J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Georganopoulos, M.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grandi, P.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hase, Hayo
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kadler, M.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kishishita, T.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Mueller, C.
    Nakamori, T.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohno, M.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Ojha, R.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Pagani, C.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Plotz, C.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ripken, J.
    Ritz, S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sanchez, D.
    Sander, A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Starck, J. -L
    Stawarz, L.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE VIEW OF THE CORE OF THE RADIO GALAXY CENTAURUS A2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 719, no 2, p. 1433-1444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present gamma-ray observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A). The previous EGRET detection is confirmed, and the localization is improved using data from the first 10 months of Fermi science operation. In previous work, we presented the detection of the lobes by the LAT; in this work, we concentrate on the gamma-ray core of Cen A. Flux levels as seen by the LAT are not significantly different from that found by EGRET, nor is the extremely soft LAT spectrum (Gamma = 2.67 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.08(sys) where the photon flux is Phi alpha E-Gamma). The LAT core spectrum, extrapolated to higher energies, is marginally consistent with the non-simultaneous HESS spectrum of the source. The LAT observations are complemented by simultaneous observations from Suzaku, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-ray Telescope, and radio observations with the Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry program, along with a variety of non-simultaneous archival data from a variety of instruments and wavelengths to produce a spectral energy distribution (SED). We fit this broadband data set with a single-zone synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton model, which describes the radio through GeV emission well, but fails to account for the non-simultaneous higher energy TeV emission observed by HESS from 2004 to 2008. The fit requires a low Doppler factor, in contrast to BL Lac objects which generally require larger values to fit their broadband SEDs. This indicates that the gamma-ray emission originates from a slower region than that from BL Lac objects, consistent with previous modeling results from Cen A. This slower region could be a slower moving layer around a fast spine, or a slower region farther out from the black hole in a decelerating flow. The fit parameters are also consistent with Cen A being able to accelerate ultra-high energy cosmic-rays, as hinted at by results from the Auger observatory.

  • 26. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Drlica-Wagner, A.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giebels, B.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Gustafsson, M.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Jeltema, T. E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, R. P.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Moretti, Elena
    University and INFN of Trieste.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Profumo, S.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ritz, S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Schalk, T. L.
    Sellerholm, A.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Bullock, James S.
    Kaplinghat, Manoj
    Martinez, Gregory D.
    Observations of Milky way dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Fermi-large area telescope detector and constraints on dark matter models2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 712, no 1, p. 147-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the observations of 14 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope taken during the first 11 months of survey mode operations. The Fermi telescope, which is conducting an all-sky gamma-ray survey in the 20 MeV to > 300 GeV energy range, provides a new opportunity to test particle dark matter models through the expected gamma-ray emission produced by pair annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Local Group dSphs, the largest galactic substructures predicted by the cold dark matter scenario, are attractive targets for such indirect searches for dark matter because they are nearby and among the most extreme dark matter dominated environments. No significant gamma-ray emission was detected above 100 MeV from the candidate dwarf galaxies. We determine upper limits to the gamma-ray flux assuming both power-law spectra and representative spectra from WIMP annihilation. The resulting integral flux above 100 MeV is constrained to be at a level below around 10(-9) photons cm(-2) s(-1). Using recent stellar kinematic data, the gamma-ray flux limits are combined with improved determinations of the dark matter density profile in eight of the 14 candidate dwarfs to place limits on the pair-annihilation cross section of WIMPs in several widely studied extensions of the standard model, including its supersymmetric extension and other models that received recent attention. With the present data, we are able to rule out large parts of the parameter space where the thermal relic density is below the observed cosmological dark matter density and WIMPs (neutralinos here) are dominantly produced non-thermally, e. g., in models where supersymmetry breaking occurs via anomaly mediation. The gamma-ray limits presented here also constrain some WIMP models proposed to explain the Fermi and PAMELA e(+)e(-) data, including low-mass wino-like neutralinos and models with TeV masses pair annihilating into muon-antimuon pairs.

  • 27. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Battelino, Milan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    PULSED GAMMA-RAYS FROM PSR J2021+3651 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 700, no 2, p. 1059-1066Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 +/- 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 +/- 0.004 +/- 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 +/- 3 +/- 11) x 10(-8) cm(-2) s(-1). The photon spectrum is well described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE(-Gamma)e((-E/Ec)), where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is Gamma = 1.5 +/- 0.1 +/- 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E-c = 2.4 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is < 10% of the pulsed emission at the 95% confidence level. Radio polarization measurements yield a rotation measure of RM = 524 +/- 4 rad m(-2) but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra X-ray Observatory data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  • 28. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Axelsson, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Angelakis, E.
    Battelino, Milan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM A RELATIVISTIC JET IN THE NARROW-LINE QUASAR PMN J0948+00222009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 699, no 2, p. 976-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of high-energy. gamma-ray emission from the peculiar quasar PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846). The optical spectrum of this object exhibits rather narrow H beta (FWHM(H beta) similar to 1500 km s(-1)), weak forbidden lines, and is therefore classified as a narrow-line type I quasar. This class of objects is thought to have relatively small black hole mass and to accrete at a high Eddington ratio. The radio loudness and variability of the compact radio core indicate the presence of a relativistic jet. Quasi-simultaneous radio/optical/X-ray and gamma-ray observations are presented. Both radio and gamma-ray emissions (observed over five months) are strongly variable. The simultaneous optical and X-ray data from Swift show a blue continuum attributed to the accretion disk and a hard X-ray spectrum attributed to the jet. The resulting broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and, in particular, the gamma-ray spectrum measured by Fermi are similar to those of more powerful Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs). A comparison of the radio and gamma-ray characteristics of PMN J0948+0022 with the other blazars detected by LAT shows that this source has a relatively low radio and gamma-ray power with respect to other FSRQs. The physical parameters obtained from modeling the SED also fall at the low power end of the FSRQ parameter region discussed in Celotti & Ghisellini. We suggest that the similarity of the SED of PMN J0948+0022 to that of more massive and more powerful quasars can be understood in a scenario in which the SED properties depend on the Eddington ratio rather than on the absolute power.

  • 29. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Wagner, S.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Mc Glynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    MULTIWAVELENGTH MONITORING OF THE ENIGMATIC NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 PMN J0948+0022 IN 2009 MARCH-JULY2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 707, no 1, p. 727-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the recent discovery of gamma rays from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846), we started a multiwavelength campaign from radio to gamma rays, which was carried out between the end of 2009 March and the beginning of July. The source displayed activity at all the observed wavelengths: a general decreasing trend from optical to gamma-ray frequencies was followed by an increase of radio emission after less than two months from the peak of the gamma-ray emission. The largest flux change, about a factor of about 4, occurred in the X-ray band. The smallest was at ultraviolet and near-infrared frequencies, where the rate of the detected photons dropped by a factor 1.6-1.9. At optical wavelengths, where the sampling rate was the highest, it was possible to observe day scale variability, with flux variations up to a factor of about 3. The behavior of PMN J0948+0022 observed in this campaign and the calculated power carried out by its jet in the form of protons, electrons, radiation, and magnetic field are quite similar to that of blazars, specifically of flat-spectrum radio quasars. These results confirm the idea that radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies host relativistic jets with power similar to that of average blazars.

  • 30. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastier, D.
    Baughman, B. M.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Bignami, G. F.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Brueli, P.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Dormody, M.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Edmonds, Y.
    Farnier, C.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Focke, W. B.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Furazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giavitto, G.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hardino, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Kawai, N.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Meurer, C.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenk, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Rayi, P. S.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rochester, L. S.
    Rodriguez, A. Y.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Usher, T. L.
    Van Etten, A.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Venter, C.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Watters, K.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi-LAT observations of the Geminga pulsar2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 720, no 1, p. 272-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the Fermi-LAT observations of the Geminga pulsar, the second brightest non-variable GeV source in the gamma-ray sky and the first example of a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. The observations cover one year, from the launch of the Fermi satellite through 2009 June 15. A data sample of over 60,000 photons enabled us to build a timing solution based solely on gamma-rays. Timing analysis shows two prominent peaks, separated by Delta phi = 0.497 +/- 0.004 in phase, which narrow with increasing energy. Pulsed gamma-rays are observed beyond 18 GeV, precluding emission below 2.7 stellar radii because of magnetic absorption. The phase-averaged spectrum was fitted with a power law with exponential cutoff of spectral index Gamma = (1.30 +/- 0.01 +/- 0.04), cutoff energy E-0 = (2.46 +/- 0.04 +/- 0.17) GeV, and an integral photon flux above 0.1 GeV of (4.14 +/- 0.02 +/- 0.32) x 10(-6) cm(-2) s(-1). The first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones are systematic. The phase-resolved spectroscopy shows a clear evolution of the spectral parameters, with the spectral index reaching a minimum value just before the leading peak and the cutoff energy having maxima around the peaks. The phase-resolved spectroscopy reveals that pulsar emission is present at all rotational phases. The spectral shape, broad pulse profile, and maximum photon energy favor the outer magnetospheric emission scenarios.

  • 31. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Brandt, T. J.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Cannon, A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Celotti, A.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Chen, A. W.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Colafrancesco, S.
    Conrad, J.
    Davis, D. S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Angelis, A.
    de Palma, F.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gasparrini, D.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giommi, P.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grandi, P.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S-H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Garde, M. Llena
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Madejski, G. M.
    Makeev, A.
    Malaguti, G.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McConville, W.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Migliori, G.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nestoras, I.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Persic, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Razzaque, S.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reyes, L. C.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F-W
    Sanchez, D.
    Sander, A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Stawarz, L.
    Stecker, F. W.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thaver, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Torresi, E.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Villata, M.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of misaligned active galactic nuclei2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 720, no 1, p. 912-922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis is presented for 15 months of data taken with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope for 11 non-blazar active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including seven FRI radio galaxies and four FRII radio sources consisting of two FRII radio galaxies and two steep spectrum radio quasars. The broad line FRI radio galaxy 3C 120 is reported here as a gamma-ray source for the first time. The analysis is based on directional associations of LAT sources with radio sources in the 3CR, 3CRR, and MS4 (collectively referred to as 3C-MS) catalogs. Seven of the eleven LAT sources associated with 3C-MS radio sources have spectral indices larger than 2.3 and, except for the FRI radio galaxy NGC 1275 that shows possible spectral curvature, are well described by a power law. No evidence for time variability is found for any sources other than NGC 1275. The gamma-ray luminosities of FRI radio galaxies are significantly smaller than those of the BL Lac objects detected by the LAT, whereas the gamma-ray luminosities of the FRII sources are quite similar to those of FSRQs, which could reflect different beaming factors for the gamma-ray emission. A core dominance (CD) study of the 3CRR sample indicates that sources closer to the jet axis are preferentially detected with the Fermi LAT, insofar as the gamma-ray-detected misaligned AGNs have larger CD at a given average radio flux. The results are discussed in view of the AGN unification scenario.

  • 32. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Blandford, R. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Carrigan, S.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cavazzuti, E.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe.
    Charles, E.
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Costamante, L.
    Cutini, S.
    Davis, D. S.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Fegan, S. J.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Fuhrmann, L.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Itoh, R.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    McEnery, J. E.
    Mehault, J.
    Michelson, P. F.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nestoras, I.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Paneque, D.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Porter, T. A.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reyes, L. C.
    Ripken, J.
    Ritz, S.
    Romani, R. W.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sanchez, D.
    Sander, A.
    Scargle, J. D.
    Sgro, C.
    Shaw, M. S.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vilchez, N.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Acciari, V. A.
    Aliu, E.
    Arlen, T.
    Aune, T.
    Beilicke, M.
    Benbow, W.
    Boettcher, M.
    Boltuch, D.
    Bradbury, S. M.
    Buckley, J. H.
    Bugaev, V.
    Byrum, K.
    Cannon, A.
    Cesarini, A.
    Christiansen, J. L.
    Ciupik, L.
    Cui, W.
    de la Calle Perez, I.
    Dickherber, R.
    Errando, M.
    Falcone, A.
    Finley, J. P.
    Finnegan, G.
    Fortson, L.
    Furniss, A.
    Galante, N.
    Gall, D.
    Gillanders, G. H.
    Godambe, S.
    Grube, J.
    Guenette, R.
    Gyuk, G.
    Hanna, D.
    Holder, J.
    Hui, C. M.
    Humensky, T. B.
    Imran, A.
    Kaaret, P.
    Karlsson, N.
    Kertzman, M.
    Kieda, D.
    Konopelko, A.
    Krawczynski, H.
    Krennrich, F.
    Lang, M. J.
    LeBohec, S.
    Maier, G.
    McArthur, S.
    McCann, A.
    McCutcheon, M.
    Moriarty, P.
    Mukherjee, R.
    Ong, R. A.
    Otte, A. N.
    Pandel, D.
    Perkins, J. S.
    Pichel, A.
    Pohl, M.
    Quinn, J.
    Ragan, K.
    Reynolds, P. T.
    Roache, E.
    Rose, H. J.
    Schroedter, M.
    Sembroski, G. H.
    Senturk, G. Demet
    Smith, A. W.
    Steele, D.
    Swordy, S. P.
    Tesic, G.
    Theiling, M.
    Thibadeau, S.
    Varlotta, A.
    Vassiliev, V. V.
    Vincent, S.
    Wakely, S. P.
    Ward, J. E.
    Weekes, T. C.
    Weinstein, A.
    Weisgarber, T.
    Williams, D. A.
    Wissel, S.
    Wood, M.
    Villata, M.
    Raiteri, C. M.
    Gurwell, M. A.
    Larionov, V. M.
    Kurtanidze, O. M.
    Aller, M. F.
    Lahteenmaki, A.
    Chen, W. P.
    Berduygin, A.
    Agudo, I.
    Aller, H. D.
    Arkharov, A. A.
    Bach, U.
    Bachev, R.
    Beltrame, P.
    Benitez, E.
    Buemi, C. S.
    Dashti, J.
    Calcidese, P.
    Capezzali, D.
    Carosati, D.
    Da Rio, D.
    Di Paola, A.
    Diltz, C.
    Dolci, M.
    Dultzin, D.
    Forne, E.
    Gomez, J. L.
    Hagen-Thorn, V. A.
    Halkola, A.
    Heidt, J.
    Hiriart, D.
    Hovatta, T.
    Hsiao, H. -Y
    Jorstad, S. G.
    Kimeridze, G. N.
    Konstantinova, T. S.
    Kopatskaya, E. N.
    Koptelova, E.
    Leto, P.
    Ligustri, R.
    Lindfors, E.
    Lopez, J. M.
    Marscher, A. P.
    Mommert, M.
    Mujica, R.
    Nikolashvili, M. G.
    Nilsson, K.
    Palma, N.
    Pasanen, M.
    Roca-Sogorb, M.
    Ros, J. A.
    Roustazadeh, P.
    Sadun, A. C.
    Saino, J.
    Sigua, L. A.
    Sillanaa, A.
    Sorcia, M.
    Takalo, L. O.
    Tornikoski, M.
    Trigilio, C.
    Turchetti, R.
    Umana, G.
    Belloni, T.
    Blake, C. H.
    Bloom, J. S.
    Angelakis, E.
    Fumagalli, M.
    Hauser, M.
    Prochaska, J. X.
    Riquelme, D.
    Sievers, A.
    Starr, D. L.
    Tagliaferri, G.
    Ungerechts, H.
    Wagner, S.
    Zensus, J. A.
    Multi-wavelength observations of the flaring gamma-ray blazar 3C 66A in 2008 October2011In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 726, no 1, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with an external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.

  • 33. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Bloom, E. D.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Cameron, R. A.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Casandjian, J. M.
    Cecchi, C.
    Celik, Oe
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Conrad, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    de Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M-H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hayashida, M.
    Hays, E.
    Horan, D.
    Hughes, R. E.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Katsuta, J.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S-H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lovellette, M. N.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Mizuno, T.
    Monte, C.
    Monzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Naumann-Godo, M.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Omodei, N.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Raino, S.
    Rando, R.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Ripken, J.
    Roth, M.
    Sadrozinski, H. FW.
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Tajima, H.
    Takahashi, H.
    Takahashi, T.
    Tanaka, T.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Uchiyama, Y.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Wood, K. S.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi-LAT study of Gamma-ray emission in the direction of supernova remnant W49B2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 722, no 2, p. 1303-1311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an analysis of the gamma-ray data obtained with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the direction of SNR W49B (G43.3-0.2). A bright unresolved gamma-ray source detected at a significance of 38 sigma is found to coincide with SNR W49B. The energy spectrum in the 0.2-200 GeV range gradually steepens toward high energies. The luminosity is estimated to be 1.5 x 10(36) (D/8 kpc)(2) erg s(-1) in this energy range. There is no indication that the gamma-ray emission comes from a pulsar. Assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shell is the site of gamma-ray production, the observed spectrum can be explained either by the decay of neutral pi mesons produced through the proton-proton collisions or by electron bremsstrahlung. The calculated energy density of relativistic particles responsible for the LAT flux is estimated to be remarkably large, U-e,U-p > 10(4) eV cm(-3), for either gamma-ray production mechanism.

  • 34. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    Fermi observations of cassiopeia and cepheus: Diffuse gamma-ray emission in the outer galaxy2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 710, no 1, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the analysis of the interstellar gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope toward a region in the second Galactic quadrant at 100 degrees <= l <= 145 degrees and -15 degrees <= b <= +30 degrees. This region encompasses the prominent Gould Belt clouds of Cassiopeia, Cepheus, and the Polaris flare, as well as atomic and molecular complexes at larger distances, like that associated with NGC 7538 in the Perseus arm. The good kinematic separation in velocity between the local, Perseus, and outer arms, and the presence of massive complexes in each of them, make this region well suited to probe cosmic rays (CRs) and the interstellar medium beyond the solar circle. The gamma-ray emissivity spectrum of the gas in the Gould Belt is consistent with expectations based on the locally measured CR spectra. The gamma-ray emissivity decreases from the Gould Belt to the Perseus arm, but the measured gradient is flatter than expectations for CR sources peaking in the inner Galaxy as suggested by pulsars. The X-CO = N(H-2)/W-CO conversion factor is found to increase from (0.87 +/- 0.05) x 10(20) cm(-2) (K km s(-1))(-1) in the Gould Belt to (1.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(20) cm(-2) (K km s(-1))(-1) in the Perseus arm. We derive masses for the molecular clouds under study. Dark gas, not properly traced by radio and microwave surveys, is detected in the Gould Belt through a correlated excess of dust and gamma-ray emission: its mass amounts to similar to 50% of the CO-traced mass.

  • 35. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    OBSERVATION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 712, no 1, p. 459-468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) IC 443 (G189.1+3.0) with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the energy band between 200 MeV and 50 GeV. IC 443 is a shell-type SNR with mixed morphology located off the outer Galactic plane where high-energy emission has been detected in the X-ray, GeV and TeV gamma-ray bands. Past observations suggest IC 443 has been interacting with surrounding interstellar matter. Proximity between dense shocked molecular clouds and GeV-TeV gamma-ray emission regions detected by EGRET, MAGIC, and VERITAS suggests an interpretation that cosmic-ray (CR) particles are accelerated by the SNR. With the high gamma-ray statistics and broad energy coverage provided by the LAT, we accurately characterize the gamma-ray emission produced by the CRs accelerated at IC 443. The emission region is extended in the energy band with theta(68) = 0 degrees.27 +/- 0 degrees.01(stat) +/- 0 degrees.03(sys) for an assumed two-dimensional Gaussian profile and overlaps almost completely with the extended source region of VERITAS. Its centroid is displaced significantly from the known pulsar wind nebula (PWN) which suggests the PWN is not the major contributor in the present energy band. The observed spectrum changes its power-law slope continuously and continues smoothly to the MAGIC and VERITAS data points. The combined gamma-ray spectrum (200 MeV < E < 2 TeV) is reproduced well by decays of neutral pions produced by a broken power-law proton spectrum with a break around 70 GeV.

  • 36. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Ajello, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    et al,
    PSR J1907+0602: A RADIO-FAINT GAMMA-RAY PULSAR POWERING A BRIGHT TeV PULSAR WIND NEBULA2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 711, no 1, p. 64-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present multiwavelength studies of the 106.6 ms gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+06 near the TeV source MGRO J1908+06. Timing observations with Fermi result in a precise position determination for the pulsar of R.A. = 19(h)07(m)54.(s)7(2), decl. = +06 degrees 02'16(2)'' placing the pulsar firmly within the TeV source extent, suggesting the TeV source is the pulsar wind nebula of PSR J1907+0602. Pulsed gamma-ray emission is clearly visible at energies from 100 MeV to above 10 GeV. The phase-averaged power-law index in the energy range E > 0.1 GeV is Gamma = 1.76 +/- 0.05 with an exponential cutoff energy E-c = 3.6 +/- 0.5 GeV. We present the energy-dependent gamma-ray pulsed light curve as well as limits on off-pulse emission associated with the TeV source. We also report the detection of very faint (flux density of similar or equal to 3.4 mu Jy) radio pulsations with the Arecibo telescope at 1.5 GHz having a dispersion measure DM = 82.1 +/- 1.1 cm(-3) pc. This indicates a distance of 3.2 +/- 0.6 kpc and a pseudo-luminosity of L-1400 similar or equal to 0.035 mJy kpc(2). A Chandra ACIS observation revealed an absorbed, possibly extended, compact (less than or similar to 4 '') X-ray source with significant nonthermal emission at R.A. = 19(h)07(m)54.(s)76, decl. = + 06 degrees 02'14.'' 6 with a flux of 2.3(-1.4)(+0.6) x 10(-14) erg cm(-2) s(-1). From archival ASCA observations, we place upper limits on any arcminute scale 2-10 keV X-ray emission of similar to 1 x 10(-13) erg cm(-2) s(-1). The implied distance to the pulsar is compatible with that of the supernova remnant G40.5-0.5, located on the far side of the TeV nebula from PSR J1907+0602, and the S74 molecular cloud on the nearer side which we discuss as potential birth sites.

  • 37. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Asano, K.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Mc Glynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 707, no 1, p. 580-592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  • 38. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, M.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Wagner, S.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Mc Glynn, Sinéad
    Ylinen, Tomi
    FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE DISCOVERY OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASAR PKS 1454-3542009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 697, no 1, p. 934-941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of high-energy gamma-ray (GeV) emission from the flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1454-354 (z = 1.424). On 2008 September 4, the source rose to a peak flux of (3.5 +/- 0.7) x 10(-6) ph cm(-2) s(-1) (E > 100 MeV) on a timescale of hours and then slowly dropped over the following 2 days. No significant spectral changes occurred during the flare. Fermi/LAT observations also showed that PKS 1454-354 is the most probable counterpart of the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1500-3509. Multiwavelength measurements performed during the following days (7 September with Swift; 6-7 September with the ground-based optical telescope Automated Telescope for Optical Monitoring; 13 September with the Australia Telescope Compact Array) resulted in radio, optical, UV, and X-ray fluxes greater than archival data, confirming the activity of PKS 1454-354.

  • 39. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Axelsson, Magnus
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Battelino, Milan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    PULSED GAMMA RAYS FROM THE MILLISECOND PULSAR J0030+0451 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 699, no 2, p. 1171-1177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the nearby isolated millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J0030+0451 with the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). This discovery makes PSR J0030+0451 the second MSP to be detected in gamma rays after PSR J0218+4232, observed by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The spin-down power (E) over dot = 3.5 x 10(33) erg s(-1) is an order of magnitude lower than the empirical lower bound of previously known gamma-ray pulsars. The emission profile is characterized by two narrow peaks, 0.07 +/- 0.01 and 0.08 +/- 0.02 wide, respectively, separated by 0.44 +/- 0.02 in phase. The first gamma-ray peak falls 0.15 +/- 0.01 after the main radio peak. The pulse shape is similar to that of the "normal" gamma-ray pulsars. An exponentially cutoff power-law fit of the emission spectrum leads to an integral photon flux above 100 MeV of (6.76 +/- 1.05 +/- 1.35) x 10(-8) cm(-2) s(-1) with cutoff energy (1.7 +/- 0.4 +/- 0.5) GeV. Based on its parallax distance of (300 +/- 90) pc, we obtain a gamma-ray efficiency L-gamma/E similar or equal to 15% for the conversion of spin-down energy rate into gamma-ray radiation, assuming isotropic emission.

  • 40. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ackermann, M.
    Atwood, W. B.
    Bagagli, R.
    Johnson, A. S.
    Klamra, Wlodzimierz
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Pearce, Mark
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Mc Glynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Sellerholm, Alexander
    FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE VELA PULSAR2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 696, no 2, p. 1084-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Vela pulsar is the brightest persistent source in the GeV sky and thus is the traditional first target for new gamma-ray observatories. We report here on initial Fermi Large Area Telescope observations during verification phase pointed exposure and early sky survey scanning. We have used the Vela signal to verify Fermi timing and angular resolution. The high-quality pulse profile, with some 32,400 pulsed photons at E >= 0.03 GeV, shows new features, including pulse structure as fine as 0.3 ms and a distinct third peak, which shifts in phase with energy. We examine the high-energy behavior of the pulsed emission; initial spectra suggest a phase-averaged power-law index of Gamma = 1.51(-0.04)(+0.05) with an exponential cutoff at E-c = 2.9 +/- 0.1 GeV. Spectral fits with generalized cutoffs of the form e(-(E/Ec)b) require b <= 1, which is inconsistent with magnetic pair attenuation, and thus favor outer-magnetosphere emission models. Finally, we report on upper limits to any unpulsed component, as might be associated with a surrounding pulsar wind nebula.

  • 41. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ajello, M.
    Antolini, E.
    Baldini, L.
    Ballet, J.
    Barbiellini, G.
    Baring, M. G.
    Bastieri, D.
    Bechtol, K.
    Bellazzini, R.
    Berenji, B.
    Bonamente, E.
    Borgland, A. W.
    Bouvier, A.
    Bregeon, J.
    Brez, A.
    Brigida, M.
    Bruel, P.
    Buehler, R.
    Burnett, T. H.
    Buson, S.
    Caliandro, G. A.
    Camilo, F.
    Caraveo, P. A.
    Celik, Oe
    Chekhtman, A.
    Cheung, C. C.
    Chiang, J.
    Ciprini, S.
    Claus, R.
    Cognard, I.
    Cohen-Tanugi, J.
    Dermer, C. D.
    De Palma, F.
    Digel, S. W.
    do Couto e Silva, E.
    Drell, P. S.
    Dubois, R.
    Dumora, D.
    Favuzzi, C.
    Ferrara, E. C.
    Fortin, P.
    Frailis, M.
    Freire, P. C. C.
    Fukazawa, Y.
    Funk, S.
    Fusco, P.
    Gargano, F.
    Gehrels, N.
    Germani, S.
    Giglietto, N.
    Giordano, F.
    Giroletti, M.
    Glanzman, T.
    Godfrey, G.
    Grenier, I. A.
    Grondin, M. -H
    Grove, J. E.
    Guillemot, L.
    Guiriec, S.
    Hadasch, D.
    Hanabata, Y.
    Harding, A. K.
    Hays, E.
    Johannesson, G.
    Johnson, R. P.
    Johnson, T. J.
    Johnson, W. N.
    Johnston, S.
    Kamae, T.
    Katagiri, H.
    Kataoka, J.
    Keith, M.
    Kerr, M.
    Knoedlseder, J.
    Kramer, M.
    Kuss, M.
    Lande, J.
    Latronico, L.
    Lee, S. -H
    Lemoine-Goumard, M.
    Longo, F.
    Loparco, F.
    Lott, B.
    Lubrano, P.
    Makeev, A.
    Manchester, R. N.
    Marelli, M.
    Mazziotta, M. N.
    Mitthumsiri, W.
    Mizuno, T.
    Moiseev, A. A.
    Monte, C.
    Mnzani, M. E.
    Morselli, A.
    Moskalenko, I. V.
    Murgia, S.
    Nakamori, T.
    Nolan, P. L.
    Norris, J. P.
    Noutos, A.
    Nuss, E.
    Ohsugi, T.
    Okumura, A.
    Orlando, E.
    Ormes, J. F.
    Ozaki, M.
    Panetta, J. H.
    Parent, D.
    Pelassa, V.
    Pepe, M.
    Pesce-Rollins, M.
    Piron, F.
    Raino, S.
    Razzano, M.
    Reimer, A.
    Reimer, O.
    Reposeur, T.
    Rirken, J.
    Romani, R. W.
    Sadrozinski, H. F. -W
    Sander, A.
    Parkinson, P. M. Saz
    Sgro, C.
    Siskind, E. J.
    Smith, D. A.
    Smith, P. D.
    Spandre, G.
    Spinelli, P.
    Strickman, M. S.
    Suson, D. J.
    Takahashi, H.
    Tanaka, T.
    Thayer, J. B.
    Thayer, J. G.
    Theureau, G.
    Thompson, D. J.
    Thorsett, S. E.
    Tibaldo, L.
    Tibolla, O.
    Torres, D. F.
    Tosti, G.
    Tramacere, A.
    Usher, T. L.
    Vandenbroucke, J.
    Vasileiou, V.
    Vitale, V.
    Waite, A. P.
    Wang, P.
    Weltevrede, P.
    Winer, B. L.
    Yang, Z.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of gamma-ray pulsars PSR J1057-5226, J1709-4429, and J1952+32522010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 720, no 1, p. 26-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data have confirmed the pulsed emission from all six high-confidence gamma-ray pulsars previously known from the EGRET observations. We report results obtained from the analysis of 13 months of LAT data for three of these pulsars (PSR J1057-5226, PSR J1709-4429, and PSR 11952+3252) each of which had some unique feature among the EGRET pulsars. The excellent sensitivity of LAT allows more detailed analysis of the evolution of the pulse profile with energy and also of the variation of the spectral shape with phase. We measure the cutoff energy of the pulsed emission from these pulsars for the first time and provide a more complete picture of the emission mechanism. The results confirm some, but not all, of the features seen in the EGRET data.

  • 42. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Battelino, Milan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    McGlynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    EARLY FERMI GAMMA-RAY SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUASAR 3C 454.32009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 699, no 1, p. 817-823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first report of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observations of the quasar 3C 454.3, which has been undergoing pronounced long-term outbursts since 2000. The data from the Large Area Telescope, covering 2008 July 7-October 6, indicate strong, highly variable.-ray emission with an average flux of similar to 3 x 10 (6) photons cm(-2) s(-1), for energies > 100 MeV. The gamma-ray flux is variable, with strong, distinct, symmetrically shaped flares for which the flux increases by a factor of several on a timescale of about 3 days. This variability indicates a compact emission region, and the requirement that the source is optically thin to pair production implies relativistic beaming with Doppler factor delta > 8, consistent with the values inferred from Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations of superluminal expansion (delta similar to 25). The observed gamma-ray spectrum is not consistent with a simple power law, but instead steepens strongly above similar to 2 GeV, and is well described by a broken power law with photon indices of similar to 2.3 and similar to 3.5 below and above the break, respectively. This is the first direct observation of a break in the spectrum of a high-luminosity blazar above 100 MeV, and it is likely direct evidence for an intrinsic break in the energy distribution of the radiating particles. Alternatively, the spectral softening above 2 GeV could be due to gamma-ray absorption via photon-photon pair production on the soft X-ray photon field of the host active galactic nucleus, but such an interpretation would require the dissipation region to be located very close (less than or similar to 100 gravitational radii) to the black hole, which would be inconsistent with the X-ray spectrum of the source.

  • 43. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Carlson, Per
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    Fermi LAT observation of diffuse gamma rays produced through interactions between local interstellar matter and high-energy cosmic rays2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 703, no 2, p. 1249-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi mission of diffuse gamma-rays in a mid-latitude region in the third quadrant (Galactic longitude l from 200 degrees to 260 degrees and latitude vertical bar b vertical bar from 22 degrees to 60 degrees) are reported. The region contains no known large molecular cloud and most of the atomic hydrogen is within 1 kpc of the solar system. The contributions of gamma-ray point sources and inverse Compton scattering are estimated and subtracted. The residual gamma-ray intensity exhibits a linear correlation with the atomic gas column density in energy from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. The measured integrated gamma-ray emissivity is (1.63 +/- 0.05) x 10(-26) photons s(-1)sr(-1) H-atom(-1) and (0.66 +/- 0.02) x 10(-26) photons s(-1)sr(-1) H-atom(-1) above 100 MeV and above 300 MeV, respectively, with an additional systematic error of similar to 10%. The differential emissivity from 100 MeV to 10 GeV agrees with calculations based on cosmic ray spectra consistent with those directly measured, at the 10% level. The results obtained indicate that cosmic ray nuclei spectra within 1 kpc from the solar system in regions studied are close to the local interstellar spectra inferred from direct measurements at the Earth within similar to 10%.

  • 44. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Conrad, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    McGlynn, Sinéad
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    Moretti, Elena
    University and INFN of Trieste.
    BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SOURCE LIST FROM THE FIRST THREE MONTHS OF THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE ALL-SKY SURVEY2009In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 700, no 1, p. 597-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first three months of sky-survey operation with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope reveal 132 bright sources at |b| > 10 degrees with test statistic greater than 100 ( corresponding to about 10 sigma). Two methods, based on the CGRaBS, CRATES, and BZCat catalogs, indicate high-confidence associations of 106 of these sources with known active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This sample is referred to as the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). It contains two radio galaxies, namely, Centaurus A and NGC 1275, and 104 blazars consisting of 58 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 42 BL Lac objects, and 4 blazars with unknown classification. Four new blazars were discovered on the basis of the LAT detections. Remarkably, the LBAS includes 10 high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs), sources which were previously difficult to detect in the GeV range. Another 10 lower-confidence associations are found. Only 33 of the sources, plus two at |b| < 10 degrees, were previously detected with Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope( EGRET), probably due to variability. The analysis of the gamma-ray properties of the LBAS sources reveals that the average GeV spectra of BL Lac objects are significantly harder than the spectra of FSRQs. No significant correlation between radio and peak gamma-ray fluxes is observed. Blazar log N-log S distributions and luminosity functions are constructed to investigate the evolution of the different blazar classes, with positive evolution indicated for FSRQs but none for BL Lacs. The contribution of LAT blazars to the total extragalactic gamma-ray intensity is estimated.

  • 45. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Jackson, Miranda
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M.
    et al.,
    OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE2011In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 734, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present observations of the young supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We clearly detect a source positionally coincident with the SNR. The source is extended with a best-fit extension of 0 degrees.55 +/- 0 degrees.04 matching the size of the non-thermal X-ray and TeV gamma-ray emission from the remnant. The positional coincidence and the matching extended emission allow us to identify the LAT source with SNR RX J1713.7-3946. The spectrum of the source can be described by a very hard power law with a photon index of Gamma = 1.5 +/- 0.1 that coincides in normalization with the steeper H. E. S. S.-detected gamma-ray spectrum at higher energies. The broadband gamma-ray emission is consistent with a leptonic origin as the dominant mechanism for the gamma-ray emission.

  • 46. Abdo, A A
    et al.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Zook, A.
    et. al.,
    Fermi large area telescope observations of Markarian 421: The missing piece of its spectral energy distribution2011In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 736, no 2, p. 131-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the gamma-ray activity of the high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae object Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) during the first 1.5 years of Fermi operation, from 2008 August 5 to 2010 March 12. We find that the Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray spectrum above 0.3 GeV can be well described by a power-law function with photon index Gamma = 1.78 +/- 0.02 and average photon flux F(>0.3 GeV) = (7.23 +/- 0.16) x 10(-8) ph cm(-2) s(-1). Over this time period, the Fermi-LAT spectrum above 0.3 GeV was evaluated on seven-day-long time intervals, showing significant variations in the photon flux (up to a factor similar to 3 from the minimum to the maximum flux) but mild spectral variations. The variability amplitude at X-ray frequencies measured by RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT is substantially larger than that in gamma-rays measured by Fermi-LAT, and these two energy ranges are not significantly correlated. We also present the first results from the 4.5 month long multifrequency campaign on Mrk 421, which included the VLBA, Swift, RXTE, MAGIC, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments that provided excellent temporal and energy coverage of the source throughout the entire campaign (2009 January 19 to 2009 June 1). During this campaign, Mrk 421 showed a low activity at all wavebands. The extensive multi-instrument (radio to TeV) data set provides an unprecedented, complete look at the quiescent spectral energy distribution (SED) for this source. The broadband SED was reproduced with a leptonic (one-zone synchrotron self-Compton) and a hadronic model (synchrotron proton blazar). Both frameworks are able to describe the average SED reasonably well, implying comparable jet powers but very different characteristics for the blazar emission site.

  • 47. Abdo, A. A.
    et al.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Zook, A
    et al.,
    Insights into the high-energy γ-ray emission of Markarian 501 from extensive multifrequency observations in the Fermi era2011In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 727, no 2, p. 129-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the gamma-ray activity of the blazar Mrk 501 during the first 480 days of Fermi operation. We find that the average Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray spectrum of Mrk 501 can be well described by a single power-law function with a photon index of 1.78 +/- 0.03. While we observe relatively mild flux variations with the Fermi-LAT (within less than a factor of two), we detect remarkable spectral variability where the hardest observed spectral index within the LAT energy range is 1.52 +/- 0.14, and the softest one is 2.51 +/- 0.20. These unexpected spectral changes do not correlate with the measured flux variations above 0.3 GeV. In this paper, we also present the first results from the 4.5 month long multifrequency campaign (2009 March 15-August 1) on Mrk 501, which included the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), Swift, RXTE, MAGIC, and VERITAS, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments which provided excellent temporal and energy coverage of the source throughout the entire campaign. The extensive radio to TeV data set from this campaign provides us with the most detailed spectral energy distribution yet collected for this source during its relatively low activity. The average spectral energy distribution of Mrk 501 is well described by the standard one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. In the framework of this model, we find that the dominant emission region is characterized by a size less than or similar to 0.1 pc (comparable within a factor of few to the size of the partially resolved VLBA core at 15-43 GHz), and that the total jet power (similar or equal to 10(44) erg s(-1)) constitutes only a small fraction (similar to 10(-3)) of the Eddington luminosity. The energy distribution of the freshly accelerated radiating electrons required to fit the time-averaged data has a broken power-law form in the energy range 0.3 GeV-10 TeV, with spectral indices 2.2 and 2.7 below and above the break energy of 20 GeV. We argue that such a form is consistent with a scenario in which the bulk of the energy dissipation within the dominant emission zone of Mrk 501 is due to relativistic, proton-mediated shocks. We find that the ultrarelativistic electrons and mildly relativistic protons within the blazar zone, if comparable in number, are in approximate energy equipartition, with their energy dominating the jet magnetic field energy by about two orders of magnitude.

  • 48. Abdo, A.A
    et al.
    Ackermann, M
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics.
    Tornikoski, M
    et al, et al
    THE FIRST FERMI MULTIFREQUENCY CAMPAIGN ON BL LACERTAE: CHARACTERIZING THE LOW-ACTIVITY STATE OF THE EPONYMOUS BLAZAR2011In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 730, no 2, p. nr 101-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on observations of BL Lacertae during the first 18 months of Fermi LAT science operations and present results from a 48 day multifrequency coordinated campaign from 2008 August 19 to 2008 October 7. The radio to gamma-ray behavior of BL Lac is unveiled during a low-activity state thanks to the coordinated observations of radio-band (Metsahovi and VLBA), near-IR/optical (Tuorla, Steward, OAGH, and MDM), and X-ray (RXTE and Swift) observatories. No variability was resolved in gamma rays during the campaign, and the brightness level was 15 times lower than the level of the 1997 EGRET outburst. Moderate and uncorrelated variability has been detected in UV and X-rays. The X-ray spectrum is found to be concave, indicating the transition region between the low- and high-energy components of the spectral energy distribution (SED). VLBA observation detected a synchrotron spectrum self-absorption turnover in the innermost part of the radio jet appearing to be elongated and inhomogeneous, and constrained the average magnetic field there to be less than 3 G. Over the following months, BL Lac appeared variable in gamma rays, showing flares (in 2009 April and 2010 January). There is no evidence for the correlation of gamma rays with the optical flux monitored from the ground in 18 months. The SED may be described by a single-zone or a two-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, but a hybrid SSC plus external radiation Compton model seems to be preferred based on the observed variability and the fact that it provides a fit closest to equipartition.

  • 49. Abdo, A.A
    et al.
    Ryde, Felix
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ylinen, Tomi
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Ziegler, M
    et al, et al
    SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF BRIGHT FERMI-DETECTED BLAZARS IN THE GAMMA-RAY BAND2010In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 710, no 2, p. 1271-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gamma-ray energy spectra of bright blazars of the LAT Bright AGN Sample LBAS) are investigated using Fermi-LAT data. Spectral properties hardness, curvature, and variability) established using a data set accumulated over 6 months of operation are presented and discussed for different blazar classes and subclasses: flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), low-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (LSP-BLLacs), intermediate-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (ISP-BLLacs), and high-synchrotron peaked BLLacs (HSP-BLLacs). The distribution of photon index G, obtained from a power-law fit above 100 MeV) is found to correlate strongly with blazar subclass. The change in spectral index from that averaged over the 6 months observing period is < 0.2-0.3 when the flux varies by about an order of magnitude, with a tendency toward harder spectra when the flux is brighter for FSRQs and LSP-BLLacs. A strong departure from a single power-law spectrum appears to be a common feature for FSRQs. This feature is also present for some high-luminosity LSP-BLLacs, and a small number of ISP-BLLacs. It is absent in all LBAS HSP-BLLacs. For 3C 454.3 and AO 0235+164, the two brightest FSRQ source and LSP-BLLac source, respectively, a broken power law (BPL) gives the most acceptable of power law, BPL, and curved forms. The consequences of these findings are discussed.

  • 50. Abdollahi, S.
    et al.
    Larsson, Stefan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.
    Wood, K. S.
    The Second Catalog of Flaring Gamma-Ray Sources from the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis2017In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 846, no 1, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the second catalog of flaring gamma-ray sources (2FAV) detected with the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool that blindly searches for transients over the entire sky observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. With respect to the first FAVA catalog, this catalog benefits from a larger data set, the latest LAT data release (Pass 8), as well as from an improved analysis that includes likelihood techniques for a more precise localization of the transients. Applying this analysis to the first 7.4 years of Fermi observations, and in two separate energy bands 0.1-0.8 GeV and 0.8-300 GeV, a total of 4547 flares were detected with significance greater than 6s (before trials), on the timescale of one week. Through spatial clustering of these flares, 518 variable gamma-ray sources were identified. Based on positional coincidence, likely counterparts have been found for 441 sources, mostly among the blazar class of active galactic nuclei. For 77 2FAV sources, no likely gamma-ray counterpart has been found. For each source in the catalog, we provide the time, location, and spectrum of each flaring episode. Studying the spectra of the flares, we observe a harder-when-brighter behavior for flares associated with blazars, with the exception of BL Lac flares detected in the low-energy band. The photon indexes of the flares are never significantly smaller than 1.5. For a leptonic model, and under the assumption of isotropy, this limit suggests that the spectrum of freshly accelerated electrons is never harder than p similar to 2.

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