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  • 1. Bresciani, E.
    et al.
    Gleeson, T.
    Goderniaux, P.
    de Dreuzy, J. R.
    Werner, A. D.
    Wörman, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Hydraulic Engineering.
    Zijl, W.
    Batelaan, O.
    Groundwater flow systems theory: research challenges beyond the specified-head top boundary condition2016In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 1087-1090Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Engström, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mangold, Mikael
    Applying spatial regression to evaluate risk factors for microbiological contamination of urban groundwater sources in Juba, South Sudan2017In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 25, p. 1077-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study developed methodology for statistically assessing groundwater contamination mechanisms. It focused on microbial water pollution in low-income regions. Risk factors for faecal contamination of groundwater-fed drinking-water sources were evaluated in a case study in Juba, South Sudan. The study was based on counts of thermotolerant coliforms in water samples from 129 sources, collected by the humanitarian aid organisation M,decins Sans FrontiSres in 2010. The factors included hydrogeological settings, land use and socio-economic characteristics. The results showed that the residuals of a conventional probit regression model had a significant positive spatial autocorrelation (Moran's I = 3.05, I-stat = 9.28); therefore, a spatial model was developed that had better goodness-of-fit to the observations. The most significant factor in this model (p-value 0.005) was the distance from a water source to the nearest Tukul area, an area with informal settlements that lack sanitation services. It is thus recommended that future remediation and monitoring efforts in the city be concentrated in such low-income regions. The spatial model differed from the conventional approach: in contrast with the latter case, lowland topography was not significant at the 5% level, as the p-value was 0.074 in the spatial model and 0.040 in the traditional model. This study showed that statistical risk-factor assessments of groundwater contamination need to consider spatial interactions when the water sources are located close to each other. Future studies might further investigate the cut-off distance that reflects spatial autocorrelation. Particularly, these results advise research on urban groundwater quality.

  • 3. Follin, Sven
    et al.
    Stigsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    A transmissivity model for deformation zones in fractured crystalline rock and its possible correlation to in situ stress at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden2014In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Forsmark site was recently proposed by the Svensk Karnbranslehantering AB (SKB) to serve as the potential site for construction of a future geological repository for spent high-level nuclear fuel at about 470 m depth in fractured crystalline rock. The considerations included, among other things, distance from regionally significant deformation zones with highly strained rock, lithological homogeneity, low hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity with an acceptable range, and lack of potential mineral resources. This report describes the calculation of transmissivity of deduced deformation zones at Forsmark and the transmissivity model used in the regional groundwater flow modeling carried out in support of the integrated site description. Besides significant decrease with increasing depth (more than four orders of magnitude over a depth of about 1 km), the calculated transmissivity values also reveal considerable spatial variability along the strikes of the zones, i.e. lateral heterogeneity (more than two orders of magnitude). A hydro-mechanical coupling is discussed, based on presented models for the tectonic evolution and the principal stress tensor. Tentatively, laboratory-scale relationships developed from normal stress experiments on a single fracture in crystalline rock can be used to estimate the maximum values of transmissivity of deduced deformation zones at Forsmark.

  • 4.
    Hasan, Md. Aziz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Ahmed, K. Matin
    Department of Geology, University of Dhaka.
    Sracek, Ondra
    Institute of Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    von Brömssen, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Broms, Sandra
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Fogelström, Johan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mazumder, M. Lutful
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Arsenic in shallow groundwater of Bangladesh: investigations from three different physiographic settings2007In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1507-1522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occurrences of arsenic (As) in the Bengal Basin of Bangladesh show close relationships with depositional environments and sediment textures. Hydrochemical data from three sites with varying physiography and sedimentation history show marked variations in redox status and dissolved As concentrations. Arsenic concentration in groundwater of the Ganges Flood Plain (GFP) is characteristically low, where high Mn concentrations indicate redox buffering by reduction of Mn(IV)-oxyhydroxides. Low DOC, HCO3-, NH4+ and high NO3- and So(4)(2-) concentrations reflect an elevated redox status in GFP aquifers. In contrast, As concentration in the Ganges Delta Plain (GDP) is very high along with high Fe and low Mn. In the Meghna Flood Plain (MFP), moderate to high As and Fe concentrations and low Mn are detected. Degradation of organic matter probably drives redox reactions in the aquifers, particularly in MFP and GDP, thereby mobilising dissolved As. Speciation calculations indicate supersaturation with respect to siderite and vivianite in the groundwater samples at MFP and GDP, but groundwater in the GFP wells is generally supersaturated with respect to rhodochrosite. Values of log P-CO2 at MFP and GDP sites are generally higher than at the GFP site. This is consistent with Mn(IV)-redox buffering suggested at the GFP site compared to Fe(III)-redox buffering at MFP and GDP sites.

  • 5.
    Koyama, Tomofumi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Vilarrasa, Victor
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Neretnieks, Ivars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Jing, Lanru
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Shear-induced flow channels and its effect on the particle transport in a single rock fractureIn: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of mechanical shearing on fluid flow anisotropy and particle transport in rough rock fractures was investigated using numerical modeling. Two opposite surfaces of a rock fracture of 194x194 mm in size were laser scanned to generate their respective digital profiles. Fluid flow through the fracture was simulated using a finite element code that solves the Reynolds equation, while incremental relative movement of the upper surface was maintained numerically to simulate a shearing process without normal loading. The motion of solute particles during shearing was studied using a simple particle-tracking code. It was found that shearing introduces anisotropy in both fluid transmissivity and particle motion, with a greatly increased flow rate and particle travel velocity in the direction perpendicular to the direction of shear. This finding has an important impact in the interpretation of the results of coupled hydro-mechanical and tracer transport experiments of hydraulic and transport properies of rock fractures.

  • 6. Kumanova, X.
    et al.
    Marku, S.
    Fröjdö, S.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Recharge and sustainability of a coastal aquifer in northern Albania2014In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 883-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The River Mati in Albania has formed a coastal plain with Holocene and Pleistocene sediments. The outer portion of the plain is clay, with three underlying aquifers that are connected to an alluvial fan at the entry of the river into the plain. The aquifers supply water for 240,000 people. Close to the sea the aquifers are brackish. The brackish water is often artesian and found to be thousands of years old. Furthermore, the salinity, supported by delta O-18 results, does not seem to be due to mixing with old seawater but due to diffusion from intercalated clay layers. Heavy metals from mines in the upstream section of River Mati are not an immediate threat, as the pH buffering of the river water is good. Moreover, the heavy metals are predominantly found in suspended and colloidal phases. Two sulphur isotope signatures, one mirroring seawater sulphate in the brackish groundwater (delta S-34 > 21 aEuro degrees) and one showing the influence of sulphide in the river and the fresh groundwater (delta S-34 < 10 aEuro degrees), indicate that the groundwater in the largest well field is recharged from the river. The most serious threat is gravel extraction in the alluvial fan, decreasing the hydraulic head necessary for recharge and causing clogging of sediments.

  • 7.
    Liu, Longcheng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Neretnieks, Ivars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Shahkarami, Pirouz
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Meng, Shuo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Moreno, Luis
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock: a simple analytical solution and its extension for modeling velocity dispersion2017In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and robust solution is developed for the problem of solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock. The solution is referred to as the solution to the single-flow-path model and takes the form of a convolution of two functions. The first function is the probability density function of residence-time distribution of a conservative solute in the fracture-only system as if the rock matrix is impermeable. The second function is the response of the fracture-matrix system to the input source when Fickian-type dispersion is completely neglected; thus, the effects of Fickian-type dispersion and matrix diffusion have been decoupled. It is also found that the solution can be understood in a way in line with the concept of velocity dispersion in fractured rocks. The solution is therefore extended into more general cases to also account for velocity variation between the channels. This leads to a development of the multi-channel model followed by detailed statistical descriptions of channel properties and sensitivity analysis of the model upon changes in the model key parameters. The simulation results obtained by the multi-channel model in this study fairly well agree with what is often observed in field experiments—i.e. the unchanged Peclet number with distance, which cannot be predicted by the classical advection-dispersion equation. In light of the findings from the aforementioned analysis, it is suggested that forced-gradient experiments can result in considerably different estimates of dispersivity compared to what can be found in natural-gradient systems for typical channel widths.

  • 8. Marklund, Lars
    et al.
    Wörman, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Hydraulic Engineering.
    The use of spectral analysis-based exact solutions to characterize topography-controlled groundwater flow2011In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 1531-1543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spectral analysis enhances the ability to analyze groundwater flow at a steady state by separating the top boundary condition into its periodic forms. Specifically, spectral analysis enables comparisons of the impact of individual spatial scales on the total flow field. New exact spectral solutions are presented for analyzing 3D groundwater flow with an arbitrarily shaped top boundary. These solutions account for depth-decaying, anisotropic and layered permeability while utilizing groundwater flux or the phreatic surface as a top boundary condition. Under certain conditions, groundwater flow is controlled by topography. In areas where the groundwater flow is controlled by the topography, the unknown water table is often approximated by the topography. This approximation induces a systematic error. Here, the optimal resolution of digital elevation models (DEMs) is assessed for use as a top boundary in groundwater flow models. According to the analysis, the water-table undulation is smoother than the topography; therefore, there is an upper limit to the resolution of DEMs that should be used to represent the groundwater surface. The ability to represent DEMs of various spectral solutions was compared and the results indicate that the fit is strongly dependent on the number of harmonics in the spectral solution.

  • 9.
    Min, Ki Bok
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jing, Lanru
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Stephansson, O
    Determining the equivalent permeability tensor for fractured rock masses using a stochastic REV approach: Method and application to the field data from Sellafield, UK2004In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 497-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A numerical procedure to determine the equivalent permeability tensor of a fractured rock is presented, using a stochastic REV (Representative Elementary Volume) concept that uses multiple realizations of stochastic DFN (Discrete Fracture Network) models. Ten square DFN models are generated using the Monte Carlo simulations of the fracture system based on the data obtained from a site characterization program at Sellafield, Cumbria, UK. Smaller models with varying sizes of from 0.25 mx0.25 m to 10 mx10 m are extracted from the generated DFN models and are used as two-dimensional geometrical models for calculation of equivalent permeability tensor. The DFN models are also rotated in 30degrees intervals to evaluate the tensor characteristics of calculated directional permeability. Results show that the variance of the calculated permeability values decreases significantly as the side lengths of the DFN models increase, which justifies the existence of a REV. The REV side length found in this analysis is about 5 m and 8 m with 20% and 10% acceptable variations, respectively. The calculated directional permeability values at the REV size have tensor characteristic that is confirmed by a close approximation of an ellipse in a polar plot of the reciprocal of square roots of the directional permeability.

  • 10.
    Moreno, Luis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Crawford, James
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Can we use tracer tests to obtain data for performance assessment of repositories for nuclear waste?2009In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 1067-1080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With regard to the long-term safety of repositories for spent nuclear fuel, tracer tests have commonly been used in site characterisation (SC) for finding information that can be later used for performance assessment (PA). The question arises as to whether data obtained in tracer tests performed over a time scale of weeks or months are relevant for PA calculations. As part of a study overseen by the A"spo Task Force, the mechanisms that determine the radionuclide residence time under SC and PA conditions are addressed, given that they influence the validity of data transference from SC to PA. The results show that radionuclide transport in SC and PA, although governed by the same retardation mechanisms, are dominated by different sub-processes. In a practical sense this means that the parameter values (typically fracture apertures and "in situ" apparent retention data) determined in tracer tests, performed as a part of the SC program, should not be used directly for making PA predictions. The emphasis in SC should focus more on the determination of other parameters of relevance at PA timescales. The PA-specific flow rate, flow connectivity, and flow-wetted surface to flow ratio are given here as examples.

  • 11.
    Neretnieks, Ivars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Engineering.
    Some aspects of release and transport of gases in deep granitic rocks: possible implications for nuclear waste repositories2013In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1701-1716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radon, radium and helium data from three sites in granitic rock in Sweden (Forsmark and Laxemar) and Finland (Olkiluoto) from depths greater than 1,000 m were interpreted by a model that describes how daughter nuclides, including helium from uranium and thorium decay, escape from minerals, enter the pore water in the rock matrix and diffuse to the seeping water in the fractures in the rock. The radium concentrations are on the order of < 30 Bq/l of water that has recently infiltrated and then emerged from the rock. Radon concentrations are mostly several orders of magnitude larger. The model predicts values in the same range. The fair agreement between model results, field data and laboratory data over a scale spanning micrometres over meters to kilometres, and time scales of days to millions of years, shows that the micropores of the rock matrix are connected even at depths down to and beyond a kilometre. Molecular diffusion in the matrix pore water is a key migration mechanism. Laboratory-derived sorption coefficients for radium are of the same magnitude as those needed in the modelling of the in situ data to give good agreement.

  • 12.
    Shahkarami, Pirouz
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Neretnieks, Ivars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Moreno, Luis
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Liu, Longcheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemical Engineering.
    Channel network concept: an integrated approach to visualize solute transport in fractured rocks2019In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 101-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advection-dispersion equation, ADE, has commonly been used to describe solute transport in fractured rock. However, there is one key question that must be addressed before the mathematical form of the so-called Fickian dispersion that underlies the ADE takes on physical meaning in fractures. What is the required travel distance, or travel time, before the Fickian condition is met and the ADE becomes physically reasonable? A simple theory is presented to address this question in tapered channels. It is shown that spreading of solute under forced-gradient flow conditions is mostly dominated by advective mechanisms. Nevertheless, the ADE might be valid under natural flow conditions. Furthermore, several concerns are raised in this paper with regard to using the concept of a field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient in fractured rocks. The concerns are mainly directed toward uncertainties and potential bias involved in finding the continuum model parameters. It is illustrated that good curve fitting does not ensure the physical reasonability of the model parameters. It is suggested that it is feasible and adequate to describe flow and transport in fractured rocks as taking place in three-dimensional networks of channels, as embodied in the channel network concept. It is argued that this conceptualization provides a convenient framework to capture the impacts of spatial heterogeneities in fractured rocks and can accommodate the physical mechanisms underlying the behavior of solute transport in fractures. All these issues are discussed in relation to analyzing and predicting actual tracer tests in fractured crystalline rocks.

  • 13.
    Shammas, Mahaad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Jacks, K. Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Groundwater resources assessment of the Salalah coastal plainIn: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Solomon, Semere
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Environmental and Natural Resources Information System.
    Quiel, Friedrich
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Environmental and Natural Resources Information System.
    Groundwater study using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) in the central highlands of Eritrea2006In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 729-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote sensing, evaluation of digital elevation models (DEM), geographic information systems (GIS) and fieldwork techniques were combined to study the ground-water conditions in Eritrea. Remote sensing data were interpreted to produce lithological and lineament maps. DEM was used for lineament and geomorphologic mapping. Field studies permitted the study of structures and correlated them with lineament interpretations. Hydrogeological setting of springs and wells were investigated in the field, from well logs and pumping test data. All thematic layers were integrated and analysed in a GIS. Results show that groundwater occurrence is controlled by lithology, structures and landforms. Highest yields occur in basaltic rocks and are due to primary and secondary porosities. High yielding wells and springs are often related to large lineaments, lineament intersections and corresponding structural features. In metamorphic and igneous intrusive rocks with rugged landforms, groundwater occurs mainly in drainage channels with valley fill deposits. Zones of very good groundwater potential are characteristic for basaltic layers overlying lateritized crystalline rocks, flat topography with dense lineaments and structurally controlled drainage channels with valley fill deposits. The overall results demonstrate that the use of remote sensing and GIS provide potentially powerful tools to study groundwater resources and design a suitable exploration plan.

  • 15.
    Solomon, Semere
    et al.
    KTH.
    Quiel, Friedrich
    KTH.
    Groundwater study using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) in the central highlands of Eritrea (vol 14, pg 729, 2006)2006In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 1029-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remote sensing, evaluation of digital elevation models (DEM), geographic information systems (GIS) and fieldwork techniques were combined to study the groundwater conditions in Eritrea. Remote sensing data were interpreted to produce lithological and lineament maps. DEM was used for lineament and geomorphologic mapping. Field studies permitted the study of structures and correlated them with lineament interpretations. Hydrogeological setting of springs and wells were investigated in the field, from well logs and pumping test data. All thematic layers were integrated and analysed in a GIS. Results show that groundwater occurrence is controlled by lithology, structures and landforms. Highest yields occur in basaltic rocks and are due to primary and secondary porosities. High yielding wells and springs are often related to large lineaments, lineament intersections and corresponding structural features. In metamorphic and igneous intrusive rocks with rugged landforms, groundwater occurs mainly in drainage channels with valley fill deposits. Zones of very good groundwater potential are characteristic for basaltic layers overlying lateritized crystalline rocks, flat topography with dense lineaments and structurally controlled drainage channels with valley fill deposits. The overall results demonstrate that the use of remote sensing and GIS provide potentially powerful tools to study groundwater resources and design a suitable exploration plan.

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