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  • 1.
    Johansson, Nils
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Krook, Joakim
    Eklund, Mats
    The institutional capacity for a resource transition: A critical review of Swedish governmental commissions on landfill mining2017In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 70, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recycling of minerals from waste deposits could potentially double the recycling flows while offering an opportunity to address the many problematic landfills. However, this type of activity, i.e., landfill mining, brings many advantages, risks and uncertainties and lacks economic feasibility. Therefore, we investigate the capacity of the Swedish authorities to navigate the environmental, resource, and economic conditions of landfill mining and their attitude to support such radical recycling alternatives towards a resource transition.

    By analyzing three governmental commissions on landfill mining, we show how the authorities seem unable to embrace the complexity of the concept. When landfill mining is framed as a remediation activity the authorities are positive in support, but when it is framed as a mining activity the authorities are negative. Landfill mining is evaluated based on how conventional practices work, with one and only one purpose: to extract resources or remediation. That traditional mining was a starting point in the evaluation becomes particularly obvious when the resource potential shall be evaluated. The resource potential of landfills is assessed based on metals with a high occurrence in the bedrock. If the potential instead had been based on metals with low incidence in the Swedish bedrock, the potential would have been found in the human built environment.

    Secondary resources in landfills seem to lack an institutional affiliation, since the institutional arrangements that are responsible for landfills primarily perceive them as pollution, while the institutions responsible for resources, on the other hand, assume them to be found in the bedrock. Finally, we suggest how the institutional capacity for a resource transition can increase by the introduction of a broader approach when evaluating emerging alternatives and a new institutional order.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-02-16 13:52
  • 2.
    Mobjörk, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Linnér, Björn-Ola
    Sustainable funding?: How funding agencies frame science for sustainable development2006In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 67-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how research funding agencies have responded to the challenge of operationalising the policy agenda of sustainable development. Drawing on the results of a research project studying Swedish funding agencies' policy declarations, mandates and priorities as well as abstracts from funded projects, we analyse how the research domains of sustainable development are defined as well as what type of research projects they support. The article discusses consequences for the internationally emerging field of science for sustainable development. We conclude that even though economic and social aspects have been increasingly recognised, agencies predominantly emphasise the environmental dimension of sustainable development. The agencies characterise environmental research in terms of basic research and sustainable development research as applied. As a consequence, sustainable development research has become heavily oriented towards implementing the dominant political agenda. Such short-term political utility is interpreted by the funding agencies as applied research. A worrying consequence is that many fundamental questions posed within the area of sustainable development receive little or no attention in the funding agencies' priorities. Such neglected research domains include those that posit alternative framings, identify potential problems and reflect on implications of current sustainable development policy. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Måns
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden.
    Persson, Å.
    Policy note: Lessons from environmental policy integration for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda2017In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 78, p. 36-39Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Olsson, Alexander
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Grönkvist, Stefan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
    Lind, M.
    Yan, Jinyue
    School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    The elephant in the room - A comparative study of uncertainties in carbon offsets2016In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 56, p. 32-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The clean development mechanism (CDM) is a flexible mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol, which makes it possible for developed countries to offset their emissions of greenhouse gases through investing in climate change mitigation projects in developing countries. When the mitigation benefit of a CDM project is quantified, measurable uncertainties arise that can be minimised using established statistical methods. In addition, some unmeasurable uncertainties arise, such as the rebound effect of demand-side energy efficiency projects. Many project types related to land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) have been excluded from the CDM in part because of the high degree of statistical uncertainty in measurements of the carbon sink and risk of non-permanence. However, recent discussions within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) have opened up for the possibility of including more LULUCF activities in the future. In the light of this discussion, we highlight different aspects of uncertainties in LULUCF projects (e.g. the risk of non-permanence and the size of the carbon sink) in relation to other CDM project categories such as renewables and demand-side energy efficiency. We quantify the uncertainties, compare the magnitudes of the uncertainties in different project categories and conclude that uncertainties could be just as significant in CDM project categories such as renewables as in LULUCF projects. The CDM is a useful way of including and engaging developing countries in climate change mitigation and could be a good source of financial support for LULUCF mitigation activities. Given their enormous mitigation potential, we argue that additional LULUCF activities should be included in the CDM and other future climate policy instruments. Furthermore, we note that Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) are currently being submitted to the UNFCCC by developing countries. Unfortunately, the under-representation of LULUCF in comparison to its potential is evident in the NAMAs submitted so far, just as it has been in the CDM. Capacity building under the CDM may influence NAMAs and there is a risk of transferring the view on uncertainties to NAMAs.

  • 5. Palsson, Gisli
    et al.
    Szerszynski, Bronislaw
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Marks, John
    Avril, Bernard
    Crumley, Carole
    Hackmann, Heide
    Holm, Poul
    Ingram, John
    Kirman, Alan
    Buendia, Mercedes Pardo
    Weehuizen, Rifka
    Reconceptualizing the 'Anthropos' in the Anthropocene: Integrating the social sciences and humanities in global environmental change research2013In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 28, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing recognition that humans are faced with a critical and narrowing window of opportunity to halt or reverse some of the key indicators involved in the environmental crisis. Given human activities' scale and impact, as well as the overly narrow perspectives of environmental research's dominant natural sciences, a major effort is necessary to place the perspectives and insights of the humanities' and social sciences' perspectives and insights at the forefront. Such effort will require developing integrated approaches, projects, and institutions that truly do so. This article's goal is to help mobilize the social sciences and the humanities on the topic of sustainability transitions, but also call for a meaningful research agenda to acknowledge the profound implications of the advent of the Anthropocene epoch. We formulate the need for an innovative research agenda based on a careful consideration of the changing human condition as linked to global environmental change. The humanities and social sciences will need to change and adapt to this pressing, historic task.

  • 6. Röös, E.
    et al.
    Karlsson, H.
    SLU.
    Witthöft, C.
    SLU.
    Sundberg, Cecilia
    SLU.
    Evaluating the sustainability of diets-combining environmental and nutritional aspects2015In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 47, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined two methods for jointly considering the environmental impact and nutritional quality of diets, which is necessary when designing policy instruments promoting sustainable food systems. Both methods included energy content and 18 macro- and micronutrients in the diet, the climate impact, land use and biodiversity damage potential. In Method 1, the content of different nutrients in the diet was normalised based on recommended intake or upper levels for average daily intake and presented together with the environmental impacts, which were normalised according to estimated sustainable levels. In Method 2, the nutritional quality of different diets was considered by calculating their nutrient density score, and the environmental impact was then expressed per nutrient density score. Three diets were assessed; a diet corresponding to Nordic recommendations, the current average Swedish diet and a lifestyle Low Carbohydrate-High Fat (LCHF) diet. Method 1 clearly showed that the climate impact was far beyond the sustainable level for all diets, while land use was within the sustainability limit for the recommended diet, but not the other two. Comparisons based on nutrient density scores depended on the score used, but the current and LCHF diets had more impact than the recommended diet (less livestock products) for all but one score. Over- and under-consumption of nutrients were clearly shown by Method 1 but not possible to distinguish with Method 2, as normalisation was not possible, making it difficult to evaluate the absolute scale of the impacts when nutrient density scores were used. For quantitative information on the environmental and nutritional impacts of diets as support in decision-making processes, it is important that data presentation is transparent. There is limited value in reducing results to a low number of indicators that are easy to read, but difficult to interpret, e.g. nutrient density score. Method 1 allows combined assessment of diets regarding environmental impact and nutritional intake and could be useful in dietary planning and in development of dietary recommendations and other policy instruments to achieve more sustainable food systems.

  • 7.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Reconfiguring environmental expertise2013In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 28, p. 14-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the concepts 'environment' and 'expertise'. It is argued that these concepts, while having long and diverse individual histories, acquired new meaning through a process of mutual co-production which occurred largely in the period 1920-1960, thus significantly preceding the common understanding of environmentalism as a phenomenon emerging in the 1960s. It is further argued that environmental expertise is much predicated on natural science in a range of fields that were integrated into a comprehensive understanding scaling upwards from the local to the global. Quantitative analysis, observing, measuring, and monitoring rates of change of a growing set of indicators were other key features of this emerging understanding of the environmental. Yet another key aspect was the self-proclaimed ability of environmental expertise to predict rates and directions of current and, crucially, future changes of global environmental conditions, increasingly assuming that these changes were largely of human origin. In addition to thus presenting a brief history of environmental expertise the article also makes the point that the environmental was, despite changed by human action, essentially regarded as something that did not in itself belong to the human or the social and thus the implicit prerogative of the natural sciences. The article argues, on the contrary, that there is solid historical evidence to suggest that 'environment' should also, perhaps primarily, be understood as a social concept, or rather as an extension of the social into nature. As conventional environmental expertise has failed to provide the advice needed to question the driving forces behind environmental degradation and lack of sustainability it is here instead suggested that environmental expertise be fundamentally reconfigured to include the social sciences and humanities, and that concerted research efforts are directed to the understanding of the formation of environmental expertise.

  • 8.
    Wallén, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    Does the Swedish consumer's choice of food influence greenhouse gas emissions?2004In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 525-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer's choice of food can influence the environment. In Sweden, in common with many other countries, consumers need to be given information so they can make environmentally informed shopping choices. However, what is the most advantageous dietary choice to lower greenhouse emissions? This study investigates the greenhouse gas emissions associated with food production for food consumed in Sweden annually. Specifically, this study compares greenhouse gas emissions associated with a nutritionally and environmentally sustainable diet with the average consumption of food in Sweden 1999. The study concludes that the change in energy use and greenhouse gas emission associated with this change of diet is negligible. Lowering greenhouse gas emissions by changing food production processes results in more profound changes than teaching consumers to make environmentally correct choices. There is a basic need for a reduction or a replacement of the use of fossil fuels to produce and distribute our food in order to reach any significant reduction in the emission of greenhouse gases. Swedish agricultural policy does not provide ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In Sweden therefore there is an immediate need to design policy instruments with the primary aim of reducing the greenhouse effect.

  • 9.
    Wester, Misse
    Örebro University, Department of Behavioural, Social and Legal Sciences.
    Underlying Concerns in Land-Use Conflicts: The role of Place- Identity in Risk Perception2004In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 109-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few years, debates over proposed usage of land for high-risk ventures have caused some debate, both in the affected communities as well as among policy makers. It has been recognized by industry and government agencies that the opinion and concerns of the local population has to be considered in order to mediate or reduce conflicts. Usually these concerns tend to focus on issues of health and safety in relation to the risk presented by different projects. It is suggested in this paper that the discussion needs to be expanded, especially if the proposed project can alter the esthetic appearance of the landscape. It is argued in this paper that the local attachment to a specific geographical place, also referred to as place-identity, needs to be included in discussions concerning industrial risks. Research in environmental psychology has suggested that place-identity is vital to a person's identity and that. this can be seen through four principles. In this paper, suggestions are made on how these four aspects of identity can be affected in a negative way if changes are made to a landscape by the introduction of a high-risk and stigmatized industrial venture.

1 - 9 of 9
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