kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). VTI Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Eliasson, J.
    Rubensson, Isak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Stockholm Public Transport Administration.
    Distributional effects of public transport subsidies2020In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 84, article id 102674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the distribution of transit subsidies across population groups in Stockholm. We develop a novel methodology that takes into account that the subsidy per passenger varies across transit links, since production costs and load factors vary. With this, we calculate the subsidy per trip in the transit network and analyze the distribution of subsidies across population groups. The average subsidy rate in Stockholm is 44%, but the variation across trips turns out to be large: while 34% of the trips are not subsidized at all but generates a profit, 16% of the trips have a subsidy rate higher than 2/3. We calculate the concentration index to explore the distribution of subsidies across income groups. The average subsidy per person is similar for all income groups, except for the top income quintile. This holds not only for the current flat-fare system, but also for distance-based fares and fares with a constant subsidy rate. Transit subsidies is hence not effective as a redistribution policy in Stockholm. The largest systematic variation we find is across residential areas: the average subsidy per person is five times higher in the peripheral areas of the region compared to the regional core, and the subsidy per trip is ten times higher.

  • 2.
    Börjesson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Fung, Chau Man
    Proost, Stef
    How rural is too rural for transit?: Optimal transit subsidies and supply in rural areas2020In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 88, article id 102859Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optimal supply of rail and bus in low density areas is studied by calibrating a demand and supply model with three modes (car, bus and rail) to an existing low density corridor. Varying the length of the network, the frequencies and the size of the populations, allows to study the trade-off between the consumer surplus losses of the public transport users and the transit operation and maintenance costs savings. We find that for an existing rail network, the optimization of frequency is the prime source of welfare gains. The rail network is marginally beneficial in the sense that keeping the network is welfare improving as long as there is no major repair or replacement investment needed. When population in the smaller towns decreases strongly, it becomes welfare improving to close the existing rail network but a bus service remains beneficial for at least part of the network.

  • 3.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    The robustness value of public transport development plans2016In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 51, p. 236-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investments in transport are increasingly motivated by the need to improve its robustness the capacity to absorb disturbances with a minimal impact on system performance. Nonetheless, there is lack of knowledge on how to assess and quantify the robustness value of new investments. This study investigates the robustness of alternative public transport networks by assessing the consequences of link failures on network performance. A full-scan disruption impact analysis is performed and its implications on passenger's group composition and travel time losses are analysed for a public transport development plan in Stockholm, Sweden. The results suggest that as a result of the development plan, the robustness of the case study network will improve in terms of average performance deterioration as well as worst case scenario for all performance indicators. Neglecting abnormal operations in project appraisal can potentially lead to the underestimation of its benefits. Moreover, the critical links in each network are identified and impact disparity is investigated. The analysis method presented in this study can support the consideration of development plan impacts on network robustness in the strategic planning process. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. Department of Transport and Planning, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Topological evolution of a metropolitan rail transport network: The case of Stockholm2017In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 62, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure of transport networks is the outcome of a large number of infrastructure investment decisions taken over a long time span. Network indicators are widely used for characterizing transport network topology and its performance as well as provide insights on, possible developments. Little is known however on how rail bound public transport networks and their network indicators have evolved into their current form. This study conducts a longitudinal analysis of the topological evolution of a multimodal rail network by investigating the dynamics of its topology for the case of Stockholm in 1950-2025. The starting year marks the opening of the metro system while the end year is set to mark the completion of the current development plan. Based on a compilation of network topology and service properties, a year-on-year analysis of changes in global network efficiency and directness as well as local nodal centrality were conducted. Changes in network topology exhibit smooth long-term technological and spatial trends as well as the signature of top-down planning interventions. Stockholm rail network evolution is characterized by contraction and stagnation periods followed by network extensions and is currently undergoing a considerable densification, marking a shift from peripheral attachment to preferential attachment.

  • 5.
    Cats, Oded
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering. Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Wang, Qian
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Zhao, Yu
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Identification and classification of public transport activity centres in Stockholm using passenger flows data2015In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 48, p. 10-22, article id 1735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban geography could be characterized by analysing the patterns that describe the flows of people and goods. Measuring urban structures is essential for supporting an evidence-based spatial planning policy. The objective of this study is to examine how the spatial-temporal distribution of public transport passenger flow could be used to reveal urban structure dynamics. A methodology to identify and classify centres based on mobility data was applied to Metropolitan Stockholm in Sweden using multi-modal public transport passenger flows. Stockholm is known for its long-term monocentric planning with a dominant central core and radial public transport system. Strategic nodes along its radial public transport system have been a focus for development of sub-centres. Although the regional planning policy embraces a shift towards a polycentric planning policy, the results indicate that this has not been realized insofar.

  • 6. Chorus, Caspar G.
    et al.
    de Jong, Gerard C.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Modeling experienced accessibility for utility-maximizers and regret-minimizers2011In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 1155-1162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that there is a discrepancy between what Logsum-measures of accessibility aim to measure (experienced-utility) and what they actually measure (decision-utility). The latter type of utility refers to the evaluation of an alternative with the aim of making a decision, while the former refers to the evaluation of a chosen alternative after the choice has been made. We argue that accessibility should preferably be conceptualized and operationalized in terms of experienced-utility, but that this type of utility is difficult to measure. Motivated by these observations we show, taking the Logsurn as a starting point, how its building blocks (parameters estimated from choice patterns) can be used to construct closed-form and easy to compute accessibility-measures that provide an approximation of experienced-utility. We distinguish between decision-making based on utility-maximization and regret-minimization premises. Using a small-scale case-study building on departure time-choice data, we illustrate the working of the developed accessibility-measures and highlight how they differ from the Logsum-approach.

  • 7. Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Relationships among discretionary activity duration, its travel time spent and activity space indices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area, Indonesia2016In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 54, p. 148-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the interdependencies among an individual's time allocation for different activities and the travel time spent on a given day, socio-demographic and built environment variables on these in-home and out of-home discretionary activities time duration, and how interaction of those variables on discretionary activities time duration influences an individual's activity space indices in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area (JMA), Indonesia. The 3SLS model and the 2004 SITRAMP household travel survey were used to achieve this objective. The results show that the time allocation for certain discretionary activities significantly influences the time allocation for other discretionary activities. Workers, students and non-workers have different complex mechanisms pertaining to how they allocate time across different activities and journeys. This unique trade-off mechanism gives an individual a unique distribution of activity locations and spatial movement patterns. This is observed via his/her activity space indices throughout time and space. For example, the estimation result shows that workers' and students' time-use allocation, activities participation and activity space indices are highly influenced by their engagement in mandatory activities. However, this is not the case for non-workers. Furthermore, the mandatory travel time variable has a stronger impact on an individual's discretionary activities time-use pattern than the duration of mandatory activities. This may lead to the argument that, in order to provide more opportunities and flexibilities among the JMA's workers and students for undertaking discretionary activities, travel time reduction policies can play more significant role in shaping the discretionary activity-travel patterns than reduction in working/school hour policies. Additionally, in-line with previous findings in developed countries, locating grocery shops closer to residential areas in the CBD and in suburban areas creates more opportunities for workers and students to spend more time on out-of-home maintenance activities; with a shorter travel time, especially on. Fridays.

  • 8. Dharmowijoyo, Dimas B. E.
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Analysing the complexity of day-to-day individual activity-travel patterns using a multidimensional sequence alignment model: A case study in the Bandung Metropolitan Area, Indonesia2017In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 64, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a panel regression model and a multidimensional three-week household time-use and activity diary, this study analyses the complexity of the day-to-day variability in individuals' activity-travel patterns by applying a multidimensional sequence alignment model. It is found that the variability between weekend and weekday pairs is much greater than between weekday-weekday pairs or weekend-weekend pairs. The variability of other household members' activity-travel patterns is found to significantly influence an individual's activity-travel patterns. The results also show that the variability in the activity-travel patterns of workers and students is greater when conducting a particular discretionary activity on weekdays. Due to performing discretionary activities more often and for longer, non-workers tend to have more predictable activity-travel patterns. Undertaking multitasking activities within different activities on weekdays significantly impacted the different degrees of variability in an individual's activity-travel patterns. Having different health and built environment characteristics also corresponds with different degrees of predictability of the activity-travel patterns, particularly in the worker/student case.

  • 9.
    Drummond, John Amin
    et al.
    Department of Geography, King's College London, Strand Campus, London, WCB2 4BG, UK, Strand Campus.
    Malamud, Bruce D.
    Department of Geography, King's College London, Strand Campus, London, WCB2 4BG, UK, Strand Campus.
    Mulligan, Joe
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. Kounkuey Design Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden; Nairobi, Kenya.
    Bukachi, Vera
    Kounkuey Design Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden; Nairobi, Kenya.
    Talib, Manshur
    Kounkuey Design Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden; Nairobi, Kenya.
    Wandera, Amos
    Kounkuey Design Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden; Nairobi, Kenya.
    Pelling, Mark
    Department of Geography, King's College London, Strand Campus, London, WCB2 4BG, UK, Strand Campus.
    Taylor, Faith E.
    Department of Geography, King's College London, Strand Campus, London, WCB2 4BG, UK, Strand Campus.
    COVID-19 Interventions in an informal settlement: A spatial analysis of accessibility in Kibera, Kenya2023In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 113, article id 103704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a methodology to explore pedestrian accessibility in informal settlements. This methodology is applied to pandemic intervention sites in Nairobi's Kibera area for 3.5 months (14 April to 31 July 2020) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Freely available transportation network data and open-source GIS software are utilised. Isochrones, areas of equal travel time, are calculated to assess pedestrian accessibility (walk times) from 30,231 Kibera structures to 138 COVID-19 stationary intervention sites. These sites aid in virus control, resource distribution, and COVID-related medical support. Travel times are determined considering different terrain slopes. Unequal access to intervention sites is observed due to indirect routes. Shortest walks (up to 21.5 min) are to handwashing and food distribution points, while longer walks (up to 61.5 min) are to interventions with fewer sites or localised clustering, such as baby product distribution. This simple accessibility analysis helps identify service gaps during crises, aiding planning authorities and communities. Our methodology offers insight into travel patterns in slums and has wider applicability to assess the relationships between transport infrastructure provision and resilience in informal settlements.

  • 10.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Market effects of regional high-speed trains on the Svealand line2005In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 352-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When the Svealand line in Sweden opened in 1997, it replaced an older railway line between Eskilstuna and Stockholm (a distance of 115 km). Service on the Svealand line is operated with regional high-speed trains. In a case study of the effects of regional high-speed train services, changes in knowledge, valuations and travel behaviour have been analysed. The Svealand line has sparked an increase in regional rail travel of up to seven times compared to the old railway between Eskilstuna and Stockholm. Additionally, the market share has risen from 6% to 30%. Travelling times are valued highly and motorists, particularly, place great value on the high-speed train mode of transport.

    A general conclusion is that regional high-speed train services have had a major impact on the travel market and on travel behaviour. The improved accessibility to Stockholm, in particular, is especially noticeable among residents living close to the railway stations.

  • 11.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, The KTH Railway Group.
    Perspectives for a future high-speed train in the Swedish domestic travel market2008In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 268-277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gröna tåget (the Green Train) is a research and development project with the aim to develop a high-speed tilting train concept for the Swedish and Nordic markets. Competition with other modes needs to be evaluated, especially as regards travelling times and fares, with special attention paid to domestic airlines.

    For new trains, gains in travelling times and lower operational costs can be expected. Model calculations of operational costs for domestic air stages and high-speed trains, respectively, show that high-speed trains have lower costs per available seat kilometer. Train operators can meet competition with fares from coaches and air carriers provided they introduce yield management. The primary competition is about travelling times. Gröna tåget would increase the train’s attractiveness and win over some travel from airlines.

  • 12.
    Fröidh, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Nelldal, Bo-Lennart
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    The impact of market opening on the supply of interregional train services2015In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 46, p. 189-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A stepwise deregulation of all interregional passenger rail services in Sweden was legally completed in 2010. The incumbent operator (SJ) thereby lost the sole rights to commercial services. The most evident supply increase is the establishment of services in the low-cost niche, which rather complements than competes with the incumbent's supply. Public Transport Authorities' (PTAs) joint services have however resulted in strong competition on at least one main line. Despite a period of almost five years since deregulation, the potential effects of the market opening have not yet fully materialised. The business risk for commercial rail operators seems to be much greater than for other modes like air and long distance coach services. SJ have also during decades of deregulated intermodal and years of intramodal competition developed their products and skills and seem well prepared for competition.

  • 13.
    Jenelius, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Network structure and travel patterns: explaining the geographical disparities of road network vulnerability2009In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 234-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inevitably, links in the road network are sometimes disrupted because of adverse weather, technical failures or major accidents. Link closures may have different economic and societal consequences depending on in which regions they occur (regional importance), and users may be affected differently depending on where they travel (regional exposure). In this paper we investigate in what way these geographical disparities depend on the road network structure and travel patterns. We propose aggregate supply-side (link redundancy, network scale, road density, population density) and demand-side (user travel time, traffic load) indicators and combine them in statistical regression models. Using the Swedish road network as a case study, we find that regional importance is largely determined by the network structure and the average traffic load in the region, whereas regional exposure is largely determined by the network structure and the average user travel time. Our findings show that the long-term vulnerability disparities stem from fundamental properties of the transport system and the population densities. Quantitatively, they show how vulnerability depends on different variables, which is of interest for robust network design.

  • 14.
    Jonsson, R. Daniel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Transport and Location Analysis.
    Analysing sustainability in a land-use and transport system2008In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 28-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we investigate some implications of including intergenerational fairness when appraising the impact of transport policy on an urban land-use and transport system. The paper also reports on the implementation of an appraisal framework where the main elements of sustainability is taken into account. The land-use and transport system of Stockholm is modelled using the land-use model IMREL, paired with the state-of-the-art transport model SAMPERS.The intergenerational fairness is handled by modifying the normal exponential discounting of a cost–benefit analysis. We form the weighted sum of a normal cost–benefit analysis and the horizon year costs and benefits without discounting. The relative weight put on each term is governed by an intergenerational parameter, α. What we do is let the undiscounted horizon year represent the long term future, so setting α = 0 means using an ordinary exponential discount rate. α = 1 on the other hand puts all weight on the long term future, ignoring costs and benefits for the years up to the horizon year. We experiment with some values of the intergenerational parameter to see how it affects the ranking of combinations of two policy instruments.Optimisation is employed to further analyse the implications of using combinations of instruments. A problem that arises when packaging instruments into strategies is that the number of possible combinations gets large. Optimisation can be of use to find the interesting ones. Our modelling package is fairly detailed, which means long computations, and generally not suited for automated optimisation. Instead we use a response surface method, where the objective function is approximated with a quadratic function, which is fitted to model computed values of the objective function by regression.

     

  • 15.
    Kolkowski, Lukas
    et al.
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Delft, Netherlands..
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning. Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Delft, Netherlands..
    Dixit, Malvika
    Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Delft, Netherlands..
    Verma, Trivik
    Delft Univ Technol, Fac Technol Policy & Management, Delft, Netherlands..
    Jenelius, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Cebecauer, Matej
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Rubensson, Isak Jarlebring
    Publ Transport Adm, Trafikforvaltningen, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Measuring activity-based social segregation using public transport smart card data2023In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 110, article id 103642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While social segregation is often assessed using static data concerning residential areas, the extent to which people with diverse background travel to the same destinations may offer an additional perspective on the extent of urban segregation. This study further contributes to the measurement of activity-based social segregation between multiple groups using public transport smart card data. In particular, social segregation is quantified using the ordinal information theory index to measure the income group mix at public transport journey destination zones. The method is applied to the public transport smart card data of Stockholm County, Sweden. Applying the index on 2017-2020 data sets for a selected week, shows significant differences between income groups' segregation along the radial public transport corridors following the opening of a major rail project in the summer of 2017. The overall slight decrease in segregation over the years can be linked to declining segregation in the city center as a travel destination and its public transport hubs. Increasing zonal segregation is observed in suburban and rural zones with commuter train stations. This method helps to quantify social segregation, enriching the analysis of urban segregation and can aid in evaluating policies based on the dynamics of social life.

  • 16.
    Lin, Jingyi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Geodesy and Geoinformatics.
    Network analysis of China's aviation system, statistical and spatial structure2012In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 22, p. 109-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aviation systems are less geographically constrained compared to ground transportation because their routes are not so affected by geographical conditions. For this reason, aviation systems are endowed to some extent with a distinctive network topology and spatial pattern. In this article, the statistical features of China’s aviation system (CAS) are investigated through a complex network approach by examining weekly flight patterns. The correlation study proves the existence of a spatial hierarchical structure within China’s aviation network, which implies a more complex spatial mechanism. Subsequently the spatial structure of CAS is explored based on the flight distances between airport cities. In light of three measurements of node strength, population and GDP, It has been decided that the spatial effect of China’s aviation system should be analyzed separately in term of different distance scales. Only for medium- and long-distance travel, the flight patterns conform to a gravitation law; therefore, the distance dependence function can be generalized as a scaling relationship. In summary, from a complex network angle, this paper provides preliminary but enlightening insights to understanding the unique spatial mechanism of aviation systems.

  • 17.
    Lin, Joanne Yuh-Jye
    et al.
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, United States.
    Jenelius, Erik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Cebecauer, Matej
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning.
    Jarlebring Rubensson, Isak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Transport and Systems Analysis.
    Chen, Cynthia
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Washington, United States.
    The equity of public transport crowding exposure2023In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 110, article id 103631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public transport crowding exposure is known to cause discomfort, stress and dissatisfaction. However, the distribution and equity of crowding exposure across socioeconomic groups has been largely unexplored. This paper opens a new research topic connecting crowding exposure in public transport to travelers’ socioeconomic characteristics. We present a framework for assessing the equity of in-vehicle crowding exposure based on automatic data sources. Two metrics are considered for quantifying the travelers’ in-vehicle crowding exposure: (1) the excess perceived travel time and (2) the relative excess perceived travel time. The proposed methodology computes the two metrics based on travel diaries and in-vehicle loads inferred from automated fare collection data. We implement Lorenz curves, Gini and Suits coefficients to evaluate horizontal (across the population) and vertical equity (considering income as well as mobility ability and need). The vertical equity is further discussed using clusters of socioeconomic groups and results from spatial lag regression models to assess the distribution of crowding exposure across socioeconomic characteristics. The results for the Stockholm Region case study indicate that crowding exposure varies substantially across the service area, with the highest values found in the denser urban areas close to Stockholm City. We find that the distribution across socioeconomic groups is relatively even, but travelers from areas that are wealthier, higher educated, have higher share of rental housing or lower vehicle ownership areas tend to be exposed to more crowding. The paper provides tools to support public transport planners in decision-making, showing where to intervene to reduce crowding exposure efficiently to achieve urban equity and sustainability.

  • 18. Liu, C.
    et al.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Dharmowijoyo, D. B. E.
    Investigating intra-household interactions between individuals’ time and space constraints2018In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 73, p. 108-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activity space of an individual is defined as the activity-travel environment which a traveller is using for his or her activities (Axhausen et al., 2002). It is limited by this individual's ability and resources, such as available time for travel as well as his or her anchor points. However, most existing studies have focused on single individual activity space, ignoring the fact that individuals’ activities often interact with that of his or her family members’. In this paper a multivariate model is proposed where the correlation between travel time of fathers and mothers, and the correlation between the activity space and travel time are modelled explicitly. The estimated correlations from these joint distributions provide insights into both the intra-household interactions in daily travel and the intrinsic relationships of the hidden limits in the dimensions of space and time. The travel time limits are modelled using a stochastic frontier model component, which can estimate an unobserved upper or lower limit for travel time expenditure. This limit usually refers to the maximum travel time budget or minimum travel time need, which denotes the maximum or minimum amount of travel time that an individual is willing or able to allocate per day. The concept of the confidence ellipse is used as a measure of activity space constructed from the multi-day travel diary data. It is hypothesised that the unobserved travel time limits and activity space sizes of fathers and mothers are correlated with each other, due to a similar spatial knowledge and accessibility to various facilities. The daily variations in the travel time expenditure of parents are also assumed to be correlated because of daily household task allocation and joint household travel. Data collected from a three-week household travel diary in the Bandung Metropolitan Area in Indonesia are used for estimation in this study. The estimated frontier model component shows that neither parent has reached their maximum travel time budget and/or minimum travel time need that they inherently must spend. Compared with other attributes, the perceived accessibility attributes play the most important role in influencing the activity space limits. For households with fully employed fathers, a trade-off mechanism is found in travel time expenditure between parents, which is likely due to the redistribution of household tasks. On the other hand, for households with fathers who are not fully employed, a complementary effect is found, arising from the joint travel among household members. The travel time budget and activity space limits of fathers are positively correlated with those of mothers. These findings call for the formulation of transport policies that consider the household as a unit, especially in developing countries such as Indonesia, to fulfil the mobility needs of different market segments, e.g., households with fully employed fathers and those with fathers who are not fully employed.

  • 19.
    Liu, Chengxi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Susilo, Yusak O.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Karlström, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport and Location Analysis. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Transport Studies, CTS.
    Examining the impact of weather variability on non-commuters' daily activity-travel patterns in different regions of Sweden2014In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 39, p. 36-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By jointly modelling the routine and leisure activity travel engagements of non-commuters in different regions of Sweden, this paper explores the interactions between time allocation, travel demand and mode choice under different weather conditions. Combined weather and travel survey datasets that span a period of over 13 years were analysed. Simultaneous Tobit models were applied to explore the interactions among these activity travel indicators, whilst municipalities' unique conditions and heterogeneities between different time-points were taken into account. The model results reveal the trade-offs between routine and leisure activities in terms of activity duration, number of trips and travel time. Positive mutual endogeneity was found between slow-mode share in routine and leisure trips. The results also highlight the trade-offs between routine and leisure activities under abnormal weather conditions. Regional differences between weather effects are substantial due to differences in direct, indirect and total marginal effects. Between-municipality variability constitutes a considerable part of the variability in activity duration and travel time. Between-municipality variability in leisure activity duration and leisure travel time is larger in northern Sweden, while that of routine activity duration and routine travel time is larger in central Sweden, after weather and social demographics have been controlled.

  • 20. Loder, Allister
    et al.
    Tanner, Reto
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Axhausen, Kay W.
    The impact of local work and residential balance on vehicle miles traveled: A new direct approach2017In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 64, p. 139-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a new approach for explaining the effects of spatial competition for opportunities based on a cumulative opportunities measure of accessibility. We focus on the case of the labor market where some municipalities offer too few workplaces for their local population, forcing some of their residents to long drives. We apply this new accessibility measure to explain households' annual mileage in Switzerland using a Heckman model to account for carless households. We find that car travel demand is much greater in municipalities with a relative undersupply in the local labor market compared to a balanced or oversupplied local labor market. The results show that driving increases with greater distance to the labor market center. The model estimates allow policy makers and planners to quantify as a first assessment the expected average mileage in each municipality for new settlements and to identify municipalities with low expected annual mileage.

  • 21.
    Moreira, Gustavo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Ceccato, Vania
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Testing theft transmission in and around São Paulo metro stations, Brazil2021In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 94, p. 103116-, article id 103116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metro stations are criminogenic places that radiate and/or absorb crime. In this paper, we assess potential theft transmission in these places and their surrounding areas using police recorded data from the Sa similar to o Paulo metro system in Brazil. The study classifies whether metro stations are crime absorbers, crime radiators, or both, by time of day and day of the week. Time series data were used to test the empirical model (panel vector autoregressive) and Granger tests for temporal precedence. Findings show that 'theft waves' recorded in the metro stations often precede in time those that occur in the stations' surrounding areas. However, on weekdays, during off-peak hours, the opposite might happen: stations absorb some of the crime that spills over from criminogenic surrounding areas into the stations. Since there is evidence of transmission of crime from one environment to another, in both directions, better cooperation between police responsible for security in the surrounding areas and the metro security staff might improve crime prevention initiatives in these transit settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Making plans or "just thinking about the trip"? Understanding people's travel planning in practice2014In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 35, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ICT solutions have been proposed as a means for changing environmentally unfavourable traffic behaviour by providing better, real-time and more accessible travel information. However, prevailing models of travel choice and travel behaviour tend to overemphasise the impact and importance of information and the individualistic perspective. The issue of choice and travel planning in everyday life situations, and how information is used and acted on in these processes, was examined in a qualitative study in Stockholm, Sweden. Practice Theory was used as the theoretical framework for the study. Interviews were supplemented with an explorative diary and photo assignment to bring unreflected choices and actions of planning travel to the conscious level.

    The results showed that travel planning involves the immediate situation where planning and decisions are made, but also aspirations, cognitive/time/material limitations, social norms and social relations that extend widely in time and space. Definitions of travel planning and travel information based on the situated practices of planning are suggested. In the muddle of everyday life, travel planning takes place in the brief moments where circumstances at different levels – time, place, the social realm - interact and are considered or directly acted upon. In the development of new ICT-based travel information services, the role of technology in changing normal practices should be considered.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Nyblom 2014 Making plans or just thinking about the trip
  • 23.
    Pettersson, Pierre
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Traffic and Logistics.
    Schmoecker, Jan-Dirk
    Active ageing in developing countries?: - trip generation and tour complexity of older people in Metro Manila2010In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 613-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is by now quite a substantial body of literature discussing the impact of an ageing population in developed countries on travel needs and required changes to transport policy. As many newly developed and developing countries are following demographic trends of "first world" countries, but offset by some decades, the problem is, however, not limited to the industrialised nations. The focus of this paper is on Metro Manila and analyses travel patterns by those aged 60 or over. Trip frequency and tour complexity are analysed with ordered probit regression, separating the effects of socio-demographic characteristics as well as land-use patterns. The results are compared to observations made for cities in developed countries, in particular London as an example for a city in a first world country. We show that there is a more pronounced decrease in total trips made with increasing age in Manila. However, analysing for specific trip purposes we find, similarly to trends in developed countries, that the number of recreational trips is fairly constant in all age groups. Recreational activities also seem to take more time per day than average for younger old, possibly indicating the advent of similar active ageing trends as in industrialised nations. The paper concludes by discussing some implications given future economic trends and advocates that better datasets from developing and newly developed countries are required for urban planning in developing countries.

  • 24.
    Rubensson, Isak
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Stockholm Reg Publ Transport Adm, Dept Strateg Developement, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, System Analysis and Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Cats, Oded
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Transport planning. Delft Univ Technol, Dept Transport & Planning, Delft, Netherlands..
    Fair accessibility - Operationalizing the distributional effects of policy interventions2020In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 89, article id 102890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fair distribution of public transport benefits is a commonly stated goal of agencies and operators of public transport. However, it is less complicated and costly to provide accessibility in some parts of cities and their surroundings than in other parts. Densely populated areas, and areas situated closer to the city center therefore often have higher public transport accessibility than remote or sparsely populated areas. Neglecting these realities results with an unrealistic assessment of equity in service provision and hampers their consideration when setting policy goals. In this study, we propose a framework for investigating equity in the distribution of accessibility, where the suggested goal is to provide residents with equal accessibility for equally dense and central areas. For the Stockholm County, we show that accessibility may seem to be distributed horizontally inequitable and vertically regressive. However, once controlling for how dense and close to the city center residents live, while still being horizontally inequitable the distribution of accessibility in Stockholm County is found progressive, i.e., benefiting those with lower incomes. We demonstrate the proposed method for the case of skip-stop train operations and find that it shifts our constructed accessibility measure toward a more horizontally inequitable and vertically progressive state. We conclude that our proposed method can be a potent way for public transport agencies to measure and concretize equity goals and evaluate policy changes.

  • 25.
    Sharmeen, Fariya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Management Res, Dept Geog Planning & Environm, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Ghosh, Bipashyee
    Univ Sussex, Sch Business Management & Econ, Sci Policy Res Unit SPRU, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Mateo-Babiano, Iderlina
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Design, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Policy, users and discourses: Examples from bikeshare programs in (Kolkata) India and (Manila) Philippines2021In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 90, article id 102898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines two bikeshare programs implemented in two Global South cities, examining the role of users in promoting sustainable transport. To explore the sustainability of smart cycling, we argue that it is important to understand the prevailing administrative and socio-institutional practices within a given context. For the effective stabilisation of smart regimes, harmony between the administrative and socio-institutional practices must be established. In this context, we introduce a complementary approach to understanding transitions. Maintenance of political commitments and institutional support are crucial for cycling success, not incidental footloose initiatives. We explore two case studies in the context of the Global South, in the first one top-down policies and planning initiatives dictate the directions of transitions by enabling or constraining user routines. In the second one, citizens take control to resolve a transport deficit by initiating and driving a very bottom-up user-led transition narrative. We propose a framework to cater to the unique political, cultural and smart discourses of the Global South and the role of users in conjunction with the administrative and socio-institutional practices around them. Investigating both the bikeshare cases through the lens of this framework provides unique insights extending our knowledge beyond the built environment features of sustainable planning initiatives. Our findings reveal the complex narratives that are in play in developing nations and conclude that understanding and realising cycling transitions in southern megacities require a different approach compared to the Global North.

  • 26.
    Smeds, Emilia
    et al.
    Urban Innovation and Policy Laboratory, Department for Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (STEaPP), University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Robin, Enora
    Urban Institute, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.
    McArthur, Jenny
    Urban Innovation and Policy Laboratory, Department for Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy (STEaPP), University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Night-time mobilities and (in)justice in London: Constructing mobile subjects and the politics of difference in policy-making2020In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 82, p. 102569-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing interest in urban night-time economies and night-time transport policies presents an important context in which to examine how mobility justice is conceived and operationalised in policy-making. Literature on transport exclusion and transport justice documents the disadvantages experienced by different social groups and advances theoretical frameworks for distributive justice and transport accessibility. However, this literature has rarely considered the politics of whether and how mobility difference is recognised and planned for in transport policy, including issues of deliberative justice (participation) and epistemic justice (knowledge production). To address these research gaps, this paper engages with Sheller's (2018) theorisation of mobility justice and critically analyses the construction of mobile subjects in policy discourse on night-time mobility. We analyse policy documents part of night-time policy for Greater London to examine the extent to which the differentiated night-time mobilities across social categories (gender, age, ethnicity, income, etc.) are recognised – in other words, how the ‘politics of difference’ play out in transport policy-making. Findings show that the discursive construction of mobile subjects in London's night-time policy distinguishes between workers, consumers, and transport users, yet, these broad categories poorly account for differentiated mobility needs and practices. Publicly available data on differentiated night-time mobilities in London does not inform current policy discourse, obscuring disadvantages experienced by different groups of people moving through the city at night, and thus limits the capacity of existing policy interventions to address mobility injustices. These findings reaffirm the need for transport research to move beyond distributive justice and accessibility analysis, towards exploring the potential of thinking about distributive and epistemic justice for challenging the status quo of transport policy.

  • 27.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, System Analysis and Economics.
    Bounded Rational Choice Behaviour2017In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 62, p. 265-266Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Susilo, Yusak
    et al.
    University of the West of England, Bristol, UK.
    Waygood, Owen
    A long term analysis of the mechanisms underlying children's activity-travel engagements in the Osaka metropolitan area2012In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 41-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a series of conventional large-scale household travel surveys conducted in the Osaka metropolitan area of Japan in 1980, 1990 and 2000 this study examines the mechanisms underlying children's activity and travel engagements and how these mechanisms have changed over time. The results from a structural equation model show that, in the last two decades, children's trip patterns in the Osaka metropolitan area have become more efficient through greater trip chaining. At the same time, the results also show that boys have become less mobile and their non-school activities tend to be in fewer locations than those of girls. Further, Japanese boys are the ones who travelled by car more frequently than girls. Denser built environments, accessibility by rail transport, and a higher number of school trips have constantly reduced the amount of children's private car trips in the last three decades. Moreover, private car availability did not significantly increase the amount of children trip chaining in any observed year. This finding goes against the commonly held belief that public transport is less suitable for trip chaining. This is presumably due to the travel environment created by the well developed transit networks and dense land use in the study area.

  • 29.
    Turk, Umut
    et al.
    Abdullah Gul Univ, Kayseri, Turkey..
    Osth, John
    Open Univ, Heerlen, Netherlands.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kourtit, Karima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places. Open Univ, Heerlen, Netherlands.;Alexandru Ioan Cuza Univ, Iasi, Romania.;Univ Technol, Benguerir, Morocco.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.;Polytecn Univ, Ben Guerir, Morocco.;Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Poznan, Poland..
    Nijkamp, Peter
    Open Univ, Heerlen, Netherlands.;Alexandru Ioan Cuza Univ, Iasi, Romania.;Univ Technol, Benguerir, Morocco.;Uppsala Univ, Uppsala, Sweden.;Polytecn Univ, Ben Guerir, Morocco.;Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Poznan, Poland..
    The path of least resistance explaining tourist mobility patterns in destination areas using Airbnb data2021In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 94, article id 103130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Destination attractiveness research has become an important research domain in leisure and tourism economics. But the mobility behaviour of visitors in relation to local public transport access in tourist places is not yet well understood. The present paper seeks to fill this research gap by studying the attractiveness profile of 25 major tourist destination places in the world by means of a 'big data' analysis of the drivers of visitors' mobility behaviour and the use of public transport in these tourist places. We introduce the principle of 'the path of least resistance' to explain and model the spatial behaviour of visitors in these 25 global destination cities. We combine a spatial hedonic price model with geoscience techniques to better understand the place-based drivers of mobility patterns of tourists. In our empirical analysis, we use an extensive and rich database combining millions of Airbnb listings originating from the Airbnb platform, and complemented with TripAdvisor platform data and OpenStreetMap data. We first estimate the effect of the quality of the Airbnb listings, the surrounding tourist amenities, and the distance to specific urban amenities on the listed Airbnb prices. In a second step of the multilevel modelling procedure, we estimate the differential impact of accessibility to public transport on the quoted Airbnb prices of the tourist accommodations. The findings confirm the validity of our conceptual framework on 'the path of least resistance' for the spatial behaviour of tourists in destination places.

  • 30.
    Zhang, Wen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Susilo, Yusak
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Termida, Nursitihazlin Ahmad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science.
    Investigating the interactions between travellers' familiar areas and their multi-day activity locations2016In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 53, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mental map is considered a representation of an individual's spatial cognition. It defines an individual's choice set of plausible activity locations and influences his/her daily activity-travel patterns. Despite its importance, how individuals' activity travel patterns interact with their mental maps on a daily basis is largely unknown, mainly due to data, operation, and measurement issues. The aim of this study is to address this. A total of 57 individuals in Stockholm were asked to record a two-week travel diary and draw their familiar areas in the specified maps. The familiar areas, which in this study are considered as representative of individual mental maps, were manually drawn and transferred from graph to ASCII code in ArcGIS for modelling purposes. The recently visited activity locations were used to construct the individuals' activity spaces. The crucial determinants that related to these activity spaces and familiar areas were investigated. The marginal effect of each key variable was calculated in order to understand the magnitude of influence of each variable to the individuals' activity spaces and familiar areas. The results show that an individual's activity space is partially or completely located within the individual's familiar areas and they are strongly correlated to each other. Large activity centres, such as Stockholm's central areas and areas of Huvudsta have higher probabilities to be included in both individuals' familiar areas and activity spaces than other areas that are closer to home.

  • 31.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Climate impact of international travel by Swedish residents2012In: Journal of Transport Geography, ISSN 0966-6923, E-ISSN 1873-1236, Vol. 25, p. 87-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International travel is increasing rapidly, but emissions from this segment are not included in the Kyoto Protocol and seldom in national statistics. The aim of this paper is to estimate the volume of international travel by the Swedish population, and the emissions of greenhouse gas associated with that travel. Data used are from a national travel survey for 2006 including 27,000 telephone interviews. It is shown that international travel by the Swedish population amounted to 37 billion passenger-km, or 4100 km per capita in 2006. This corresponds to 22.5% of total travel by Swedes, an increase from 16.6% in 1994. Emissions of greenhouse gases from international travel by the Swedish population in 2006 amounted to 8.5 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalents, of which 92% stems from air travel. This is approx. 11% of total Swedish emissions including international transport. It is concluded that a continued growth of international travel at current pace hardly may be reconciled with long-term climate targets.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf