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  • 1.
    Borgström, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Funding ecological restoration policy in practice-patterns of short-termism and regional biases2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 439-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With continuous degradation of ecosystems combined with the recognition of human dependence on functioning ecosystems, global interest in ecological restoration (ER) has intensified. From being merely a nature conservation measure, it is today advanced as a way to improve ecosystem functions, mitigate biodiversity loss and climate change, as well as renew human-nature relationships. However, ER is a contested and diversified term used in research, policy and practice. Substantive public funding is allocated towards this end worldwide, but little is known about its concrete purpose and coverage, as well as what decides its allocation. With inspiration from environmental funding literature we analyze the case of Sweden to provide the first national overview of public ER funding. The understudied political context of ER is thus addressed but also regional variation in funding allocation. A database of all national government funding programs between 1995 and 2011 that included projects and sub-programs aiming at practical ER measures was created. Results show that ER activities counted for 11% (130 million USD) of the total government nature conservation funding. Water environments were highly prioritized, which can be explained by economic and recreational motives behind ER. The ER funding was unevenly distributed geographically, not related to either environmental need or population size, but rather to regional administrative capacity. It was also found to be small scale and short term, and hence part of a general trend of project proliferation of public administration which runs contrary to ecosystem based management. As ER is not yet a long-term investment in Sweden, commonly seen as an environmental lead state, we expect even less and more short-term ER funding in other countries.

  • 2.
    Egeskog, Andrea
    et al.
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Barretto, Alberto
    Brazilian Bio-ethanol Science and Technology Laboratory(CTBE).
    Berndes, Göran
    Chalmers University, Energy and Environment.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Holmén, Magnus
    echnology Management and Economics and connected to Center for Business Innovation.
    Sparovek, G.
    Torén, Johan
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Actions and opinions of Brazilian farmers who shift to sugarcane: an interview-based assessment with discussion of implications for land-use change2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 57, p. 594-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sugarcane ethanol systems can deliver large greenhouse gas emissions savings if emissions associated with land-use change are kept low. This qualitative study documents and analyzes actions and opinions among Brazilian farmers who shift to sugarcane production. Semi-structured interviews were held with 28 actors associated with sugarcane production in three different regions: one traditional sugarcane region and two regions where sugarcane is currently expanding. Most farmers considered sugarcane a land diversification option with relatively low economic risk, although higher risk than their previous land use. Beef production was considered a low-risk option, but less profitable than sugarcane. In conjunction with converting part of their land to sugarcane, most farmers maintained and further intensified their previous agricultural activity, often beef production. Several farmers invested in expanded production in other regions with relatively low land prices. Very few farmers in the expansion regions shifted all their land from the former, less profitable, use to sugarcane. Very few farmers in this study had deforested any land in connection with changes made when shifting to sugarcane. The respondents understand "environmental friendliness" as compliance with the relevant legislation, especially the Brazilian Forest Act, which is also a requirement for delivering sugarcane to the mills. Indirect land-use change is not a concern for the interviewed farmers, and conversion of forests and other native vegetation into sugarcane plantations is uncontroversial if legal. We derive hypotheses regarding farmers' actions and opinions from our results. These hypotheses aim to contribute to better understanding of what takes place in conjunction with expansion of sugarcane and can, when tested further, be of use in developing, e.g., policies for iLUC-free biofuel production.

  • 3. Franzen, Frida
    et al.
    Hammer, Monica
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Institutional development for stakeholder participation in local water management-An analysis of two Swedish catchments2015In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 43, p. 217-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) promotes a change of European water governance towards increased stakeholder participation and water management according to river basins. To implement the WFD, new institutional arrangements are needed. In Sweden, water councils have been established on the local level to meet the requirements of the WFD of a broad stakeholder involvement in water management. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge on institutional arrangements for meeting the WFD requirements on stakeholder participation in local water management. A case study of two adjacent catchments in southern Sweden is presented to analyze how institutional legacy affect organizational arrangements and stakeholder participation. Based on literature studies and semi-structure interviews, the case study is analyzed with special emphasis on the scope, the organization and the activities in practical water Management in catchments. The result shows different institutional arrangements for water management, despite similarities of the catchments' characteristics and the regulatory framework on national and regional level. The study identifies four important factors regarding institutional arrangements for water councils and local stakeholder participation in water management. Firstly, an organization involving key stakeholders that are committed to the scope and goals of the water council and willing to provide resources for the implementation of the planned activities. Secondly, institutional arrangements that include a willingness for flexibility and awareness of the need to include the most relevant stakeholders. Thirdly, a clear leadership to drive the process to realize the specific goals and assess the outcome. Fourthly, voluntary involvement of farmers to take part in the implementation of the measures and contribute with knowledge and experiences regarding local conditions.

  • 4.
    Freitas, Flavio L. M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Sparovek, Gerd
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Klug, Israel
    Berndes, Göran
    Chalmers.
    Offsetting legal deficits of native vegetation among Brazilian landholders: Effects on nature protection and socioeconomic development2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 68, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Brazilian native vegetation supports essential ecosystem services and biodiversity for the global society, whileland use competition may intensify around the increasing needs for food, fibre and bioenergy. The Brazilian Forest Actof 2012 amplified a market-based mechanism for offsetting native vegetation deficits in private farmlands. Thismechanism enables a large-scale trading system allowing landholders to offset their own deficits of native vegetationby purchasing certificates associated with a surplus of native vegetation from other landholders. This mechanism is analternative for the more expensive restoration of native vegetation on own land. The launching of the mechanism nowdepends on specific regulations at state level, which may include geographical restrictions for offsetting deficits. Theaim of this study is to evaluate the effects in nature protection and socio-economic development of different offsettingimplementation alternatives. Our findings suggest that in a business-as-usual scenario the offsetting mechanism mayhave little or no additional effects on protection of native vegetation, because most of the offsetting is likely to takeplace where native vegetation is already protected by prevailing legislations. We concluded that it is possible tomaximise environmental and socio-economic returns from the offsetting mechanism without undermining productiveland. This would be possible if regulations ensure additionality in nature protection while enabling a self-sustainingmechanism for income generation for small-scale family farmers in the poorest region of Brazil, protecting biodiversityand counteracting major trade-offs between ecosystem services.

  • 5.
    Granath Hansson, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management.
    Promoting planning for housing development: What can Sweden learn from Germany?2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 64, p. 470-478, article id 0264-8377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the years 2006–2014, urban planning reform was seen as the major remedy against housing shortagein Sweden. The present government has the continuation of such reform on its agenda, but as of yet has made no proposals; instead, other housing policy measures have been introduced.In light of the uncertainty as to the future course of urban planning reform, possible future steps can be discussed. This article accordingly investigates whether German urban planning law and implementation could provide interesting reference points for discussion of further urban planning reform in Sweden,and if so, what parts of the German experience should be the center of attention.The article covers three aspects of German planning that influence the uncertainty, duration, and cost of residential planning as well as social goals addressed through planning: planning law, focusing on facilitated planning procedures of German planning law, measures taken in the organization of plan-ning authorities to make development planning more efficient, and planning-related city demands for affordable housing.The conclusions encompass proposals for the further reform of the Swedish planning process in the form of a facilitated and accelerated development planning procedure for housing projects, as well as the introduction of private initiative in development planning. Further improvements to the organization and incentives of planning authorities are proposed. More research is required into municipal demands for affordable housing in the form of inclusionary zoning; such research should draw on the extensive international experience of such zoning, relating it to a Swedish pilot project.

  • 6.
    Harahap, Fumi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Khatiwada, Dilip
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Land allocation to meet sectoral goals in Indonesia – An analysis of policy coherence2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 61, p. 451-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Land is a scarce resource affecting the implementation of many sectoral policies. In Indonesia, the expansion of palm oil plantations has led to non-sustainable land use practices in past years, particularly deforestation. More recently, the government has set ambitious targets for the adoption of biodiesel which will require expansion of oil palm plantations, thus putting further pressure on land. Meanwhile, the need to guarantee food supply, forest conservation and climate change mitigation also imply challenges when it comes to land allocation and use. This paper examines the role that land plays in the implementation of sectoral policies in Indonesia, exploring the availability of land to satisfy the multiple goals defined in national policies. We explore land competition resulting from allocations made in official policy documents starting with biofuel policy. The analysis of policy goals and coherence when it comes to land allocation is made in relation to agriculture, climate and forestry policies. We conclude that adjustments need to be made in the policies to avoid overlappings and misinterpretations when it comes to land allocation. The area made available for meeting each sectoral policy goal when taking into account cross sectoral interactions is: 14.2 Mha for agriculture, 43 Mha for climate mitigation measures, 9.2 Mha for forestry, and 20.9 Mha for biofuels. A more uniform land classification and development of a common reference database will increase transparency on land allocation and use, and help to monitor land use change, ultimately supporting the achievement of multiple national goals.

  • 7.
    Hedblom, Marcus
    et al.
    Department of Swedish Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Borgström, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Flexible land-use and undefined governance: From threats to potentials in peri-urban landscape planning2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 63, p. 523-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Densification of cities is presently one of the dominating strategies for urbanization globally. However, how densification of cities is linked to processes in the peri-urban landscapes is rather unknown. The aim of this paper is to highlight the potentials in of peri-urban landscapes to be recognized as complementary providers of urban ecosystem services when green areas in cities are reduced by densification. We suggest that the way forward is to change the perceptions of peri-urban areas from being defined as located between cities and rural areas with a specific population density or a geographical distance, to become recognized as a landscape defined by its functionality. By identifying and describing the functionality in peri-urban landscapes the existing governance gaps can be recognized and thus dealt with through adaptation of existing planning tools. Although not yet articulated, peri-urban areas should be used to facilitate integration of top down and bottom up approaches and thereby closing the governance gaps. We illustrate this reasoning by two examples; one of the establishment of green wedges in Stockholm, Sweden, and the other with the establishments of international Model forests. We conclude that further densification of cities will create a lack of ecosystem services in cities by putting an even higher pressure on the peri-urban landscape and not as suggested today that densification lower pressure on peri-urban landscapes. Rethinking and reframing the peri-urban areas by adapting existing platforms will potentially contribute to a more nuanced discussion on strategies for urban development generally.

  • 8.
    Högstrom, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability and Environmental Engineering.
    Balfors, Bent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Sustainability Assessment and Management. Sodertorn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Hammer, Monica
    Sodertorn Univ, Sch Nat Sci Technol & Environm Studies, S-14189 Huddinge, Sweden..
    The role of small-scale planning projects in urban development: A case study in the metropolitan Stockholm region, Sweden2019In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 84, p. 294-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As urban areas are developing and becoming increasingly important for dealing with sustainability goals and challenges, it is of the essence not to overlook the impacts created by the local, small-scale processes taking place across metropolitan regions. Based on a case study conducted in the expansive Stockholm region, this study explores the challenges associated with linking small-scale development to long-term overall strategy and development in municipal spatial planning. More specifically, it explores planning practitioners' experiences of how local planning processes are organized to deal with established cross-cutting sustainability goals and the conditions for promoting sustainability in small-scale development projects. The results show that municipal planners face several organizational, procedural, and knowledge-related challenges that also influence the interplay between public and private actors in the process. To promote suStainable trajectories at the local level, it is necessary to devote resources and build capacity to further develop the relationship and interdependency between the processes of translation and formalization, which constitute an important link between the project-specific planning process and the overall strategy and development.

  • 9.
    Kourtit, Karima
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Nijkamp, Peter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Center for the Future of Places.
    Big data dashboards as smart decision support tools for i-cities - An experiment on stockholm2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 71, p. 24-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the strategic governance challenges of modern smart cities from the new viewpoint of big data management. It seeks to develop and highlight a systematic methodological framework for handling multivariate big data in a smart urban decision support context in the 'New Urban World', so as to enhance the cities' competitive performance through the design and development of operational urban management principles and strategies. The specific aim of this paper is to provide the critical and basic cornerstones for an applicable interactive dashboard architecture as a supporting tool in a structured process of innovative city strategies and consequent enhanced socio-economic performance. A core element in the present paper is formed by a smart urban dashboard system that acts as an interactive navigation tool supporting operational choices of all stakeholders involved. This dashboard is able to integrate complex and ever-changing big data bases serving as 'signposts' of city intelligence (or i-city smartness) for daily or strategic decisions of all urban stakeholders. This study thus outlines successively the concept of smart i-cities in our 'urban century', the great potential of digital technology for managing big data in governing i-cities, and the foundations of an urban dashboard on the basis of the so-called Pentagon model as a policy strategy vehicle. Starting from extensive data on a broad set of global cities, the potential of this approach is exemplified by means of an illustrative application of a smart urban dashboard for the city of Stockholm.

  • 10. Li, YH.
    et al.
    Li, YR.
    Westlund, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Liu, YS.
    Urban-rural transformation in relation to cultivated land conversion in China: Implications for optimizing land use and balanced regional development2015In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 47, p. 218-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to investigate land conversion as a result of urban-rural transformation in the Chinese context. Theoretical analysis and empirical study of the Bohai Rim region find strong connections between the land conversion rates and urban-rural transformation intensity in the period 2000-2010. Rapid land conversion normally takes place in counties/districts of low initial level of urban-rural transformation. However, places of high initial socioeconomic level and low transformation intensity would experience slow land conversion. The different land conversion rates in relation to urban-rural transformation intensity are mainly attributed to the China's land quotas distribution system which is subjective and administrative. The study highlights the implementation of land quotas distribution system based on differences to improve the land distribution efficiency and achieve balanced regional development in China.

  • 11. Paasch, Jesper M.
    et al.
    van Oosterom, Peter
    Lemmen, Christiaan
    Paulsson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Further modelling of LADM's Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities (RRRs)2015In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 49, p. 680-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a more detailed classification of the legal part of the Land Administration Domain Model (LADM), ISO 19152 (i.e. interests in land), than described in the current standard by further developing the LADM's 'right', 'restriction' and 'responsibility' (RRR) class and associated code lists. Besides the more obvious formal right descriptions, this paper also deals with informal rights' descriptions as introduced in the Social Tenure Domain Model (STDM) as a foundation for further LADM development. The authors base their research on the Legal Cadastral Domain Model, as developed by and described in the Ph.D. thesis of Paasch, which is used as a conceptual basis for adding an additional level to the LADM. Interests in land can be classified in this model as limiting or beneficial to real property ownership. The extended classification is further based on the paradigm that there are two major types of interest in land, privately agreed interests and regulations imposed by a public agency. The incorporation of a specialized classification of RRRs in the LADM is of value for more inclusion of social tenure in (inter-)national land administration registers. The LADM allows national profiles to be added to the standard, however, such profiles are relevant within a country. These profiles are needed in cases where detailed data of interests in land have to be exchanged internationally. International data exchange requires maintenance of code tables representing the different RRRs in use within countries. OICRF has announced an initiative in support to this.

  • 12.
    Paulsson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Reasons for introducing 3D property in a legal system-Illustrated by the Swedish case2013In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 33, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) property rights has for many years been a tool for providing secure and lasting rights for the use of land and its volume of space in complex situations involving land use in the urban society. The aim of this article is to investigate the reasons for introducing 3D property in a legal system. This is illustrated by using the Swedish system as an example. In general, without the possibility of forming 3D property units with direct ownership, other forms have to be used, such as indirect ownership or granted user rights. Benefits of ownership in comparison with different types of rights include a more secure way of guaranteeing the possession of real property and the possibility of mortgaging the property. There are lower transaction costs compared with user rights, arising from legally securing three-dimensionally delimited parts of real property. 3D property also enables an increase in the density of private ownership. 3D property is a useful way of solving problems related to the use of space by different parties with different needs. In the Swedish legislation the introduction of 3D property formation has increased the possibility of constructing and financing in particular large and more complex facilities. It has created more secure and clear ways of constructing infrastructure objects and separating them from other types of use within the space of the same traditional property.

  • 13.
    Paulsson, Jenny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Real Estate Planning and Land Law.
    Paasch, J. M.
    The Land Administration Domain Model - A literature survey2015In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The international standard for land administration, LADM, ISO 19152, has been the subject of numerous research activities during the last one and a half decade, with topics ranging from technical implementation issues and the registration of real property to legal and organisational aspects. However, some areas have been more researched than others.The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the research as evidenced by research publications 2001-2015 to discuss the distribution of interest areas within LADM research.In total 184 publications on LADM have been analysed in the study. The result shows that technical and real property registration issues have been in focus throughout the surveyed period, whereas there has been less focus on research on legal and organisational matters. There has, however, in recent years been an slight increase in legal research, whereas research on organisational matters, such as efficiency and how to organise and manage interests in land and the benefits and costs for implementing the standard, still is lacking in comparison with the other investigated fields of research, and should be an important area to research now during the implementation phase of LADM.

  • 14. Vij, Sumit
    et al.
    Narain, Vishal
    Karpouzoglou, Timothy
    Mishra, Patik
    From the core to the periphery: Conflicts and cooperation over land and water in periurban Gurgaon , India2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 76, no April, p. 382-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent studies that emphasize the contested nature of resource allocation address the politics of periurban development. However, the issue of conflicts and cooperation in periurban contexts continues to remain weakly studied. Based on the study of periurban Gurgaon in North-West India, this paper unravels the different types of conflicts and cooperation that have emerged around land and water, drawing insights from conflict/cooperation studies and urban political ecology. We focus on how changes in land-use bring about changes in water use, access and practices in periurban Gurgaon, giving rise to new forms of conflicts, conflicts of interest and co- operation. Conflicts over land and water are linked to the changing characteristics of land and water appro- priation that has occurred in the aftermath of neoliberal reforms. Drawing insights from urban political ecolog perspective, we show how periurban areas are systematically undermined through the acquisition of land and water to serve urban expansion and growth. We conclude that periurban conflicts are rooted in the issue of land- use change and are fundamentally tied to the politics of urbanization and its impact on periurban areas. These processes give rise to conflicts of interest and explicit conflicts, whilst creating new forms of cooperation. Cooperation is exemplified by emerging forms of collective action over the use of wastewater and groundwater. The paper distinguishes between conflict and cooperation but concludes that these are in fact not mutually exclusive; rather points along a continuum.

  • 15.
    Wu, Chia-Jung
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Isaksson, Karolina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies. The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Sweden.
    Antonson, H.
    The struggle to achieve holistic landscape planning: Lessons from planning the E6 road route through Tanum World Heritage Site, Sweden2017In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 67, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the EU introduced the European Landscape Convention (ELC) in 2000, the landscape has received growing attention in spatial planning and environmental impact assessments. To promote implementation of the ELC, the Swedish National Heritage Board proposed its Landscape Vision 2020, which addresses the goal of a ‘holistic landscape policy’. This study examined challenges and benefits brought by such a holistic approach to handling landscape protection/management within four issues in planning practice, namely cross-sector cooperation, local participation, integrating culture and nature, and bridging past and future. The analysis focused on a controversial road project passing through a World Heritage Site in Sweden. The results showed that the four issues were closely interlinked. In the case study, a new wave of cross-sector cooperation at authority level was observed, but it was also found to dominate the entire planning process and eventually limit the achievement of the other three issues. In conclusion, this study identified institutional culture and political context as key explanatory factors for understanding how the ELC and a holistic landscape view can be implemented in national practice.

  • 16.
    Zhang, Qian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment. Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, CCAP, 11A,Datun Rd, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.;Hebei Univ, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Baiyangdian Basin Ecol Pro, Baoding 071002, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Zhongxiao
    Leiden Univ, CML, Inst Environm Sci, NL-2300 RA Leiden, Netherlands..
    Huang, Wei
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Econ, Box 7013, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Does land perform well for corn planting?: An empirical study on land use efficiency in China2018In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 74, p. 273-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To assess land quality for cropping, this study developed a land performance indicator (LPI), namely efficiency of total land productivity potential (TLPP), by incorporating the heterogeneity of land quality for individual agricultural production units when evaluating the performance of land for corn planting, using stochastic frontier analysis. Without taking into account land quality, the technical efficiency (TE) of corn production cannot be reasonably compared across regions because the variation in land quality is significant. The estimated mean TE was 0.77, which illustrates that there is still potential to increase output by 23%, without increasing inputs, if all agricultural production units emulate the best performing production units. The results demonstrated that the mean LPI was 0.273, with a maximum value of 1.0, implying that a large gap exists between the minimum optimum use of TLPP and observed TLPP. This finding indicates that corn planting units can achieve the same outputs with less land inputs through improving the land productivity per unit. The results also revealed that operational units with greater farm area are likely to be more efficient than with those with a smaller area, which suggests that enlarging farm area and promoting household cooperation and joint management practices are imperative to achieve agricultural modernization, enhance the competitiveness of China's agricultural production in the global market, and effectively disengage labor from agricultural production and transfer the resulting surplus labor to cities.

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