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  • 1.
    Devlic, Alisa
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture (Closed 20120101), Communication Systems, CoS (closed 2012-01-01).
    SIP-based context distribution: Does aggregation pay off?2010In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 35-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-aware applications need quickly access to current context information, in order to adapt their behavior before this context changes. To achieve this, the context distribution mechanism has to timely discover context sources that can provide a particular context type, then acquire and distribute context information from these sources to the applications that requested this type of information. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art context distribution mechanisms according to identified requirements, then introduces a resource list-based subscription/notification mechanism for context sharing. This SIP-based mechanism enables subscriptions to a resource list containing URIs of multiple context sources that can provide the same context type and delivery of aggregated notifications containing context updates from each of these sources. Aggregation of context is thought to be important as it reduces the network traffic between entities involved in context distribution. However, it introduces an additional delay due to waiting for context updates and their aggregation. To investigate if this aggregation actually pays off, we measured and compared the time needed by an application to receive context updates after subscribing to a particular resource list (using RLS) versus after subscribing to each of the individual context sources (using SIMPLE) for different numbers of context sources. Our results show that RLS aggregation outperforms the SIMPLE presence mechanism with 3 or more context sources, regardless of their context updates size. Database performance was identified as a major bottleneck during aggregation, hence we used in-memory tables & prepared statements, leading to up to 57% database time improvement, resulting in a reduction of the aggregation time by up to 34%. With this reduction and an increase in context size, we pushed the aggregation payoff threshold closer to 2 context sources.

  • 2. Fayazbakhsh, S. K.
    et al.
    Lin, Y.
    Tootoonchian, A.
    Ghodsi, Ali
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Koponen, T.
    Maggs, B.
    Ng, K. C.
    Sekar, V.
    Shenker, S.
    Less pain, most of the gain: Incrementally deployable ICN2013In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 147-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information-Centric Networking (ICN) has seen a significant resurgence in recent years. ICN promises benefits to users and service providers along several dimensions (e.g., performance, security, and mobility). These benefits, however, come at a non-trivial cost as many ICN proposals envision adding significant complexity to the network by having routers serve as content caches and support nearest-replica routing. This paper is driven by the simple question of whether this additional complexity is justified and if we can achieve these benefits in an incrementally deployable fashion. To this end, we use trace-driven simulations to analyze the quantitative benefits attributed to ICN (e.g., lower latency and congestion). Somewhat surprisingly, we find that pervasive caching and nearest-replica routing are not fundamentally necessary - -most of the performance benefits can be achieved with simpler caching architectures. We also discuss how the qualitative benefits of ICN (e.g., security, mobility) can be achieved without any changes to the network. Building on these insights, we present a proof-of-concept design of an incrementally deployable ICN architecture.

  • 3.
    Ghodsi, Ali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Sekar, Vyas
    Zaharia, Matei
    Stoica, Ion
    Multi-Resource Fair Queueing for Packet Processing2012In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Middleboxes are ubiquitous in today's networks and perform a variety of important functions, including IDS, VPN, firewalling, and WAN optimization. These functions differ vastly in their requirements for hardware resources (e.g., CPU cycles and memory bandwidth). Thus, depending on the functions they go through, different flows can consume different amounts of a middlebox's resources. While there is much literature on weighted fair sharing of link bandwidth to isolate flows, it is unclear how to schedule multiple resources in a middlebox to achieve similar guarantees. In this paper, we analyze several natural packet scheduling algorithms for multiple resources and show that they have undesirable properties. We propose a new algorithm, Dominant Resource Fair Queuing (DRFQ), that retains the attractive properties that fair sharing provides for one resource. In doing so, we generalize the concept of virtual time in classical fair queuing to multi-resource settings. The resulting algorithm is also applicable in other contexts where several resources need to be multiplexed in the time domain.

  • 4. Hollick, Matthias
    et al.
    Nita-Rotaru, Cristina
    Papadimitratos, Panagiotis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Network and Systems engineering.
    Perrig, Adrian
    Schmid, Stefan
    Toward a Taxonomy and Attacker Model for Secure Routing Protocols2017In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A secure routing protocol represents a foundational building block of a dependable communication system. Unfortunately, currently no taxonomy exists to assist in the design and analysis of secure routing protocols. Based on the Dagstuhl Seminar 15102, this paper initiates the study of more structured approaches to describe secure routing protocols and the corresponding attacker models, in an effort to better understand existing secure routing protocols, and to provide a framework for designing new protocols. We decompose the routing system into its key components based on a functional model of routing. This allows us to classify possible attacks on secure routing protocols. Using our taxonomy, we observe that the most eective attacks target the information in the control plane. Accordingly, unlike classic attackers whose capabilities are often described in terms of computation complexity we propose to classify the power of an attacker with respect to the reach, that is, the extent to which the attacker can influence the routing information indirectly, beyond the locations under its direct control.

  • 5.
    Holme, Petter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
    Karlin, Josh
    Forrest, Stephanie
    An integrated model of traffic, geography and economy in the internet2008In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 7-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling Internet growth is important both for understanding the current network and to predict and improve its future. To date, Internet models have typically attempted to explain a subset of the following characteristics: network structure, traffic flow, geography, and economy. In this paper we present a discrete, agent-based model, that integrates all of them. We show that the model generates networks with topologies, dynamics, and more speculatively spatial distributions that are similar to the Internet.

  • 6.
    Ioannidis, John
    et al.
    Columbia University.
    Duchamp, Dan
    Columbia University.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    Columbia University.
    IP-based protocols for mobile internetworking1991In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 235-245Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Marcos, Pedro
    et al.
    UFRGS and FURG.
    Chiesa, Marco
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Communication Systems, CoS, Network Systems Laboratory (NS Lab).
    Dietzel, Christoph
    DE-CIX/MPI for Informatics.
    Canini, Marco
    KAUST.
    Barcellos, Marinho
    UFRGS.
    A Survey on the Current Internet Interconnection Practices2020In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet topology has significantly changed in the past years. Today, it is richly connected and flattened. Such a change has been driven mostly by the fast growth of peering infrastructures and the expansion of Content Delivery Networks as alternatives to reduce interconnection costs and improve traffic delivery performance. While the topology evolution is perceptible, it is unclear whether or not the interconnection process has evolved or if it continues to be an ad-hoc and lengthy process. To shed light on the current practices of the Internet interconnection ecosystem and how these could impact the Internet, we surveyed more than 100 network operators and peering coordinators. We divide our results into two parts: (i)(i) the current interconnection practices, including the steps of the process and the reasons to establish new interconnection agreements or to renegotiate existing ones, and the parameters discussed by network operators. In part (ii)(ii), we report the existing limitations and how the interconnection ecosystem can evolve in the future. We show that despite the changes in the topology, interconnecting continues to be a cumbersome process that usually takes days, weeks, or even months to complete, which is in stark contrast with the desire of most operators in reducing the interconnection setup time. We also identify that even being primary candidates to evolve the interconnection process, emerging on-demand connectivity companies are only fulfilling part of the existing gap between the current interconnection practices and the network operators' desires.

  • 8. Peresini, Peter
    et al.
    Kuzniar, Maciej
    Kostic, Dejan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Network Systems Laboratory (NS Lab).
    Rule-Level Data Plane Monitoring With Monocle2015In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 595-596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Monocle, a system that systematically monitors the network data plane, and verifies that it corresponds to the view that the SDN controller builds and tries to enforce in the switches. Our evaluation shows that Monocle is capable of fine-grained per-rule monitoring for the majority of rules. In addition, it can help controllers to cope with switches that exhibit transient inconsistencies between their control plane and data plane states.

  • 9.
    Roverso, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    El-Ansary, S.
    Högqvist, M.
    On HTTP live streaming in large enterprises2013In: Computer communication review, ISSN 0146-4833, E-ISSN 1943-5819, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 489-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we present a distributed caching solution which addresses the problem of efficient delivery of HTTP live streams in large private networks. With our system, we have conducted tests on a number of pilot deployments. The largest of them, with 3000 concurrent viewers, consistently showed that our system saves more than 90% of traffic towards the source of the stream while providing the same quality of user experience of a CDN. Another result is that our solution was able to reduce the load on the bottlenecks in the network by an average of 91.6%.

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