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  • 1.
    Hermann, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Segerström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Young, Charles
    Alfstad, Thomas
    Rogner, Hans-Holger
    Steduto, Pasquale
    Climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) interlinkages in Burkina Faso: An analysis of agricultural intensification and bioenergy production2012In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 245-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) interactions in Burkina Faso. It shows that integrated assessments of resource use at the national level can provide important insights and benefits, especially for a resource constrained least developed country. Agricultural policy is shown to have strong implications for energy use, whereas energy policies are found to be strongly interrelated with water constraints. Without an integrated and coordinated approach, strategy and policy formulation efforts to increase energy, food and water security could become both incoherent and counter-productive.

  • 2.
    Quin, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Kjellen, Marianne
    How to "walk the talk": The perspectives of sector staff on implementation of the rural water supply programme in Uganda2011In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 269-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have adopted similar approaches to tackle the challenges of rural water supply, including community-based management, community participation and the demand-responsive approach. These are often combined with nationwide programmes of capacity-building and decentralization. This paper first shows how Uganda has adopted these approaches in its rural water supply programme. Based on Government documents, we construct an organizational framework that illustrates the overall programme and outlines the roles and responsibilities which actors are expected to fulfil. Second, based on interviews with sector staff and a review of Government documents, the paper examines challenges to successfully walk the talk; that is, it provides insight into challenges affecting programme implementation. Among numerous difficulties, two key issues are highlighted: local political interference and the weak capacity of local governments. Concerning local political interference, local planning processes need to be reformed so that local politicians commit more strongly to improving water supply. Regarding local government capacity, the Government department responsible for the programme has established eight regional units that provide support to local governments. This promising strategy, combined with more appropriate engagement and the commitment of local politicians, should help to improve the implementation of the rural water supply programme in Uganda.

  • 3.
    Quin, Andrew
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Kjellén, Marianne
    Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University.
    Rural water supply in Uganda: factors that limit the effectiveness of the national programme2010In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Singh, Nandita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Water Management.
    Jacks, G.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Women and community water supply programmes: An analysis from a socio-cultural perspective2005In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 213-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Community water supply programmes are seen as instrumental in achieving the goal of 'safe' water for all. Women, a principal target group of these programmes, are to be benefited with greater convenience, enhanced socio-cultural opportunities and better health for themselves and their families, provided through improved water facilities. Water supply programmes largely consist of three essential components, namely: technology, people and institutions. Although such programmes are intended to benefit women members of local communities, scant attention is paid to the impacts of the socio-cultural context of the community on these programmes. This article explores the influence of social and cultural intricacies on the implementation of community water supply programmes, and assesses their effectiveness. The article offers important lessons for the design and implementation of this type of programme. It concludes that the local sociocultural context sets the stage for programme implementation, being a dynamic factor that determines actual access to water sources, more so than mere physical availability, which is often used as a criterion for programme performance. The article stresses the urgent need to integrate socio-cultural factors as a fourth dimension in designing community water supply programmes, and suggests practical measures for enhancing the effectiveness of such programmes.

  • 5. Vanpeperstraete, Ben
    et al.
    Duyck, Sebastien
    Bhandari, Medani P.
    Brizga, Janis
    Rijnhout, Leida
    Lorek, Sylvia
    Castro, A. Peter
    Chang, Chiung Ting
    Daly, Herman
    Didham, Robert J.
    Ferraro, Gianluca
    Greenfield, Oliver
    Khosla, Ashok
    von Weizsaecker, Ernst Ulrich
    Lode, Birgit
    Miles, Simon
    Pacini, Henrique
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Silveira, Semida
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Perch, Leisa
    Rijnsburger, Jaap
    Sanwal, Mukul
    Savarala, Sameera
    Scherr, S. Jacob
    Seetharam, Kallidaikurichi E.
    Adeeb, A. M. M.
    Shepherd, Donna
    Smith, Adrian
    Ulatowska, Lisinka
    Vincent, Alice
    John, Werner
    "What do you think should be the two or three highest priority political outcomes of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), scheduled for Rio de Janeiro in June 2012?"2011In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 334-342Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
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