Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Health care managers' views on and approaches to implementing models for improving care processes2016In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To develop a deeper understanding of health-care managers' views on and approaches to the implementation of models for improving care processes. Background: In health care, there are difficulties in implementing models for improving care processes that have been decided on by upper management. Leadership approaches to this implementation can affect the outcome. Method: In-depth interviews with first- and second-line managers in Swedish hospitals were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. Results: 'Coaching for participation' emerged as a central theme for managers in handling top-down initiated process development. The vertical approach in this coaching addresses how managers attempt to sustain unit integrity through adapting and translating orders from top management. The horizontal approach in the coaching refers to managers' strategies for motivating and engaging their employees in implementation work. Conclusion and implications for nursing management: Implementation models for improving care processes require a coaching leadership built on close manager-employee interaction, mindfulness regarding the pace of change at the unit level, managers with the competence to share responsibility with their teams and engaged employees with the competence to share responsibility for improving the care processes, and organisational structures that support process-oriented work. Implications for nursing management are the importance of giving nurse managers knowledge of change management.

  • 2.
    Arman, Rebecka
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Wikström, Ewa
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Törnström, Linda
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    What health care managers do: Applying Mintzberg’s structured observation method2009In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 718-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Aim The aim of the present study was to explore and describe what characterizes first-and second-line health care managers' use of time. Background Many Swedish health care managers experience difficulties managing their time. Methods Structured and unstructured observations were used. Ten first-and second-line managers in different health care settings were studied in detail from 3.5 and 4 days each. Duration and frequency of different types of work activities were analysed. Results The individual variation was considerable. The managers' days consisted to a large degree of short activities (<9 minutes). On average, nearly half of the managers' time was spent in meetings. Most of the managers' time was spent with subordinates and <1% was spent alone with their superiors. Sixteen per cent of their time was spent on administration and only a small fraction on explicit strategic work. Conclusions The individual variations in time use patterns suggest the possibility of interventions to support changes in time use patterns. Implications for nursing management A reliable description of what managers do paves the way for analyses of what they should do to be effective.

  • 3.
    Fallman, Sara L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Ergonomics. Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Jutengren, Goran
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH). Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden.;Gothenburg Univ, Dept Sociol & Work Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    The impact of restricted decision-making autonomy on health care managers' health and work performance2019In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 706-714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate how restricted decision-making autonomy and conflicting demands impact operational managers' work performance and health. Background Managers at operational level (first- and second-line managers') in health care organisations are commonly exposed to strain in their work situation with high demands and a challenging work context. Although they play an important role, the knowledge about the causal associations between stressful job demands and their consequences is limited. Methods A prospective design with questionnaire data collected at two points in time, 1 year apart, from a sample of operational managers (N = 162) at five Swedish hospitals was used to conduct a structural equation model analysis with cross-lagged paths. Results Restricted decision-making autonomy was negatively associated with both the managers' health and their managerial work performance over time. Conclusions Health care managers' work performance and health may be sustained by the top management allowing them a higher degree of autonomy in their decision-making. Implications for nursing management This study suggests that nursing leaders should create the circumstances for operational managers' to have higher levels of autonomy in their area of responsibility and the freedom to prioritize their managerial workload.

  • 4.
    Morberg, Siv
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lagerström, Monica
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Dellve, Lotta
    Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    The perceived perceptions of head school nurses in developing school nursing roles within schools2009In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 813-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To gain a deeper understanding of how Swedish head school nurses perceive their leadership in developing school health care. Background: A well-functioning school health care is important for promoting the health of children and young people. Method: Constructivist-grounded theory was used to analyse 11 individual interviews with nine head school nurses. Results Head school nurses strive to find a balance between what they experience as vague formal goals and strong informal goals which leads to creating local goals in order to develop school health care. Conclusion: The head school nurse's job is experienced as a divided and pioneering job in which there is uncertainty about the leadership role. They provide individual support to school nurses, are the link between school nurses and decision makers and highlight the importance of school nurses' work to organizational leaders. Implications for nursing management This study shows that school health care needs to be founded on evidence-based methods. Therefore, a structured plan for education and training in school health care management, based on research and in cooperation with the academic world, would develop the head school nurses' profession, strengthen the position of school health care and advance the school nurses' work.

  • 5.
    Skagert, Katrin
    et al.
    ISM.
    Ahlborg, Gunnar
    ISM.
    Dellve, Lotta
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics (Closed 20130701). University of Borås, Sweden .
    A prospective study of managers' turnover and health in a healthcare organization2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 7, p. 889-899Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims To assess turnover and health of Swedish healthcare managers, and identify important supporting factors relating to work and individual resources. Background Individual managers' own sustainability in terms of turnover and health may be influenced by managerial working conditions and individual resources. Methods A 4-year prospective questionnaire study of 216 healthcare managers. Turnover and indicators of good health (healthy work attendance and no burnout) were related to work factors and individual resources using Cox regressions with constant time at risk. Results Forty per cent of the healthcare managers had left after 4years. Fifty-two per cent had a healthy work attendance record and the proportion with no burnout had increased. Experiencing moderate/high job control was a predictor of remaining in the managerial position. Good health was predicted by having energy left for domestic work and being thoroughly rested after sleep. Conclusions Managerial turnover seems high in Swedish healthcare and linked to working conditions, while sustained health are linked to individual resources. Implications for nursing management Healthcare organizations should focus not only on developing individuals in their managerial role but also on strengthening the conditions that allow managers to exercise their leadership and to ensuring that the managers most suitable for their posts do not leave.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf