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  • 1.
    Cha, Yingying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Tribologi.
    Tu, Minghui
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Tribologi.
    Elmgren, Max
    SLB-analys, Environment and Health Administration, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Silvergren, Sanna
    SLB-analys, Environment and Health Administration, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Tribologi.
    Factors affecting the exposure of passengers, service staff and train drivers inside trains to airborne particles2018In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 166, p. 16-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated train air conditioning filters, interior ventilation systems, tunnel environments and platform air quality as factors affecting the concentrations of airborne particles inside trains and provides information on the exposure of passengers, train drivers and service staff to particles. Particle sampling was done inside the passenger cabin, the driver cabin and the service staff cabin during on-board measurement campaigns in 2016 and 2017. The results show that interior ventilation plays a key role in maintaining cleaner in-train air. Noticeable increases in PM10 and PM2.5 levels were observed for all of the measured cabins when the train was running in the newly opened tunnel. The increases occurred when the doors of the passenger cabin and the service staff cabin were open at underground stations. The door to the driver cabin, which remained closed for the entire measurement period, acted as a filter for coarse particles (PM2.5–10). The highest particle exposure occurred in the passenger cabin, followed by the service staff cabin, while the driver had the lowest exposure. The highest deposition dose occurs for the service staff and the lowest for commuters.

  • 2.
    Mohamed, Alaa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM. Mechanical Design and Production Engineering Department, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.
    El-Sayed, R.
    Osman, T. A.
    Toprak, Muhammet
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Muhammed, Mamoun A.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Uheida, Abdusalam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Composite nanofibers for highly efficient photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes from contaminated water2016In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 145, p. 18-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study highly efficient photocatalyst based on composite nanofibers containing polyacrylonitrile (PAN), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and surface functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles was developed. The composite nanofibers were fabricated using electrospinning technique followed by chemical crosslinking. The surface modification and morphology changes of the fabricated composite nanofibers were examined through SEM, TEM, and FTIR analysis. The photocatalytic performance of the composite nanofibers for the degradation of model molecules, methylene blue and indigo carmine, under UV irradiation in aqueous solutions was investigated. The results demonstrated that high photodegradation efficiency was obtained in a short time and at low power intensity compared to other reported studies. The effective factors on the degradation of the dyes, such as the amount of catalyst, solution pH and irradiation time were investigated. The experimental kinetic data were fitted using pseudo-first order model. The effect of the composite nanofibers as individual components on the degradation efficiency of MB and IC was evaluated in order to understand the overall photodegradation mechanism. The results obtained showed that all the components possess significant effect on the photodegradation activity of the composite nanofibers. The stability studies demonstrated that the photodegradation efficiency can remain constant at the level of 99% after five consecutive cycles.

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