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  • 1.
    Boivie, Inger
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Göransson, Bengt
    Uppsala Universitet.
    The Lonesome Cowboy - A Study of the Usability Designer Role in Systems Development. Interacting with Computers2006In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 601-634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the usability designer role as applied in two Swedish systems development organisations. The role was initially defined by us, but evolved in these two organisations. We conducted interviews with usability designers, project managers and a user representative. Our main research question was whether or not the introduction of a usability designer has been successful in terms of changes in the systems development process and the impact the role has had on products, projects and organisations. To some extent, the role has met our expectations and intentions for instance, in helping the usability designers shift their focus towards design, and assume some kind of "users' advocate" role. But in other ways, the role "failed". The usability designers in our study are still facing the kind of problems and obstacles that usability professionals have always had to deal with.

  • 2.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    A longitudinal study of attitude changes in a medical service organisation after an email introduction2002In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 503-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A health care organisation was observed over a period of four years during their introduction of email to 6000 employees. The observed managers were positive to email from the start, despite problem with attachments and concerns for lacking computer knowledge. Email had a positive effect on employees attitudes to perceived computer knowledge as well as their abilities to learn more about computers. Negative for all was the blind mass mailings from within the organisation.

  • 3.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    A longitudinal study of attitude changes in a medical service organization after an email introduction2002In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 14, p. 503-519Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    How to replace an old email system with a new2000In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 601-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All organizations that use email face changes in their email systems. While some of these are only a change of version that has little effect on the organization, many will replace old email systems with new ones, and this may have severe consequences. A case study is presented where the replacement of two old mainframe-based email systems with Lotus Notes failed. Based on this failure, seven important requirements are defined to reduce problems organizations face when replacing old email systems with new ones. These requirements are supported with results from other research.

  • 5. Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Designing for programming as joint performances among groups of children2006In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1012-1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on computer programming usually views the interactions as mostly cognitively based, with focus on concepts such as memory, perception and conceptual understanding. However, the current trend towards embodied and social perspectives on interaction provides an alternative way of looking at interactive processes, instead emphasising aspects such as social and physical performance with and around technology. We have explored a range of activities and tools that explicitly address these aspects in programming, with a specific focus on children's making of own computer games and simulations. We exemplify this work through three different situations where tools and activities are used by children as recourses for building of interactive systems, while at the same time allowing for bodily action in negotiation of design ideas. We discuss how situations like these may provide directions for new technologies for programming as well as methodological developments in the area of interaction design.

  • 6.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Boivie, Inger
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Göransson, Bengt
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Usability professionals - current practices and future development2006In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 568-600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The usability concept has now received such a wide recognition in information technology (IT) development that working with usability can be regarded as a profession in its own right. In recent research projects, we have surveyed and studied usability work on an individual level in a number of Swedish development organisations, including success factors and obstacles. What we have seen relates to the individual usability professional and her background and experiences, the organisation in which she operates, the development process, communication and communication means, and finally the attitudes and basic values held by the people involved. In this paper, we compile and reflect on selected findings from different studies on usability work in practical systems(1) development in a number of Swedish organisations. We discuss our findings from a practical point of view and relate them to the research of others within the international HCI community. Finally, we discuss some issues we consider important for the future development of the practice of usability that we believe is of interest to the international community of usability professionals.

  • 7.
    Hvannberg, Ebba Thora
    et al.
    University of Iceland.
    Law, Effie Lai-Chong
    Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zurich.
    Larusdottir, Marta Kristin
    Reykjavik University.
    Heuristic evaluation: Comparing ways of finding and reporting usability problems2007In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on heuristic evaluation in recent years has focused on improving its effectiveness and efficiency with respect to user testing. The aim of this paper is to refine a research agenda for comparing and contrasting evaluation methods. To reach this goal, a framework is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of different types of support for structured usability problem reporting. This paper reports on an empirical study of this framework that compares two sets of heuristics, Nielsen's heuristics and the cognitive principles of Gerhardt-Powals, and. two media of reporting a usability problem, i.e. either using a web tool or paper. The study found that there were no significant differences between any of the four groups in effectiveness, efficiency and inter-evaluator reliability. A more significant contribution of this research is that the framework used for the experiments proved successful and should be reusable by other researchers because of its thorough structure.

  • 8.
    Jonsson, Martin
    et al.
    Sodertorn Univ, Sch Commun Technol & Design.
    Tholander, Jakob
    Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Comp Sci.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Comp Sci.
    Setting the stage: Embodied and spatial dimensions in emerging programming practices2008In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 21, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In the design of interactive systems, developers sometimes need to engage in various ways of physical performance in order to communicate ideas and to test out properties of the system to be realised. External resources such as sketches, as well as bodily action, often play important parts in such processes, and several methods and tools that explicitly address such aspects of interaction design have recently been developed. This combined with the growing range of pervasive, ubiquitous, and tangible technologies add up to a complex web of physicality within the practice of designing interactive systems. We illustrate this dimension of systems development through three cases which in different ways address the design of systems where embodied performance is important. The first case shows how building a physical sport Simulator emphasises a shift in activity between programming and debugging. The second case shows a build-once run-once scenario, where the fine-tuning and control of the run-time activity gets turned into an act of in situ performance by the programmers. The third example illustrates the explorative and experiential nature of programming and debugging systems for specialised and autonomous interaction devices. This Multitude in approaches in existing programming settings reveals an expanded perspective of what practices of interaction design consist of, emphasising the interlinking between design, programming, and performance with the system that is being developed.

  • 9. Karlgren, Jussi
    Reply to Fraser and Wrigley or Definitely Not The Last Word On Language Varieties1994In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 109-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Natural Language Processing Group, SICS.
    Sublanguages and Registers: A Note On Terminology1993In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 348-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The term sublanguage from mathematical linguistics confuses interaction researchers and leads them to believe that implementing natural language interfaces is easier than it is. The term register from sociolinguistics is proposed instead.

  • 11.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Huang, Ying Ying
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Sallnäs, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Audio makes a difference in haptic collaborative virtual environments2010In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 544-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a study is presented which aimed at exploring the effects of audio feedback in a haptic and visual interface supporting collaboration among sighted and people who cannot see. A between group design was used and the participants worked in pairs with one sighted and one blindfolded in each. The application used was a haptic 3D environment in which participants could build composed objects out of building blocks. The building blocks could be picked up and moved around by means of a touch feedback pointing device. In one version of the application sound cues could be used to tell the other person whereyou were, and to get feedback on your own and the other person’s actions. Results showed that sound cues together with haptic feedback made a difference in the interaction between the collaborators regarding their shared understanding of the workspace and the work process. Especially, sound cues played an important role for maintaining awareness of ongoing work – you knew what was going on, and you got a response on your own actions.

  • 12.
    Moll, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sallnäs Pysander, Eva-Lotta
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Severinsson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hellström, Sten-Olof
    KTH.
    The Effects of Audio and Haptic Feedback on Collaborative Scanning and Placing2014In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 177-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a study aimed at exploring the effects of different modality combinations on collaborative task performance and employed joint task-solving strategies in a shared interface. The modality combinations visual/haptic, visual/audio and visual/haptic/audio were compared in an experiment in which users solved a task together, working in pairs in adjacent rooms. The application used contained a flat surface in a 3D interface on which piles of cubes were randomly placed in a grid. The task involved scanning for empty cells and placing continuously falling cubes until all empty cells were filled. The cubes and the flat surface were designed in such a way that they could be felt and heard and thus could be recognized by different kinds of haptic and audio feedback cues. This made it possible to scan the environment and read both absolute and relative positions in the grid. A quantitative analysis of task performance and a qualitative analysis of video recordings and interview data were performed. Results showed that task completion times were significantly faster in the visual/haptic/audio condition compared with the other conditions and that there were also significantly fewer errors, result checks of one's own actions and double checks of the partner's actions in the visual/haptic/audio condition than in the other conditions. Qualitative results show that participants work simultaneously to a larger extent in the visual/haptic/audio condition and that less communication occurred in the visual/haptic/audio condition compared with the other conditions. We argue that more modalities improved the awareness of the environment resulting in the participants feeling more confident with their interaction in the environment in the visual/haptic/audio condition. This resulted in improved task performance. The visual/audio feedback was better suited for solving the task than the visual/haptic feedback even though haptic feedback gave a significant added value in the visual/haptic/audio condition.

  • 13.
    Poole, Erika S.
    et al.
    Penn State Univ, Coll Informat Sci & Technol, University Pk, PA 16802 USA..
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. Newcastle Univ, Culture Lab, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Hoonhout, Jettie
    Philips Res, Eindhoven, Netherlands..
    Disruption as a Research Method for Studying Technology Use in Homes2015In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present disruption of household routines as a method to study home technology usage. Using three case studies as guidance, we show how disrupting household practices-either through changing the technology, task or division of labor-can provide valuable insight into current and future technology usage, and can guide the design of future technologies. Based on our case studies, we outline best practices and challenges with respect to the pragmatics of disruptive research methods.

  • 14. Scholl, Jeremiah
    et al.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Of organization, device and context: Interruptions from mobile communication in highly specialized care2012In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 358-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an ethnographic study of mobile communication at a surgical unit in Sweden involved with highly specialized care for the upper abdomen. The primary focus of the study is interruptions related to usage of mobile communication, with the goal of informing the design of systems that better balance interruptions and availability. The department uses a patchwork of hospital pagers, personal cell phones, and department provided cell phones. Issues related to social factors at the department, technical features of mobile communication devices, and specific contexts where interruptions were identified to be a problem are presented. Some of the salient findings of the study include a generally complex situation with respect to interruptions that is impacted by technical, social and individual factors related to mobile communication, challenges related to managing personal and private communication on the same device, issues related to supporting distributed work in highly specialized care and how this contributes to interruptions, and a more in depth overview of specific contexts where interruptions are problematic than previous studies. Some theoretical perspectives on these issues are presented as well as implications for design.

  • 15.
    Åborg, Carl
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Lif, Magnus
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Integrating work environment considerations into usability evaluation methods - the ADA approach2003In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 453-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ADA-method is an attempt to integrate work environment issues into a usability evaluation method. The intention is to provide a method that can be used for the analysis of computer systems that are used by skilled professionals as a major part of their work. An ADA-analysis is performed as a semi-structured observation interview. The objectives of the ADA-method are (1) to identify usability and cognitive work environment problems in a computer supported work situation, and (2) to be a basis for further analysis and discussions concerning improvements of the system. The method was designed to suit the needs of occupational health specialists as a complement to their traditional methods for investigating physical and psychosocial work environments. However, the method has a more general applicability as it can be taught to any usability expert to facilitate work environment considerations in their analysis and evaluation work. Furthermore, the paper reports on the use of the method in several different settings and the results thereof.

1 - 15 of 15
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