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  • 1.
    Berns, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Toomingas, Allan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Special issue of Behavioural and Information Technology with key note lectures and selected papers from the 8th international conference on Work With Computing Systems 2007 - WWCS 2007 - in Stockholm May 21st-24th 2007 - Foreword2008In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 283-284Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Bodker, Susanne
    et al.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Usability and interaction design - new challenges for the Scandinavian tradition2008In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 293-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computer use and interaction possibilities are changing quickly, while use contexts and application types are radically broadening. Technology no longer consists of static tools belonging only to the workplace but permeates work on the move, homes and everyday lives. Pervasive technologies, augmented reality, small interfaces, tangible interfaces, etc. are dramatically changing the nature of HCI (human-computer interaction). We witness the creation of ad hoc configurations of large and small user interfaces. The new interfaces are moveable and used in changing locations and contexts; different tasks are done through a combination of specialized technologies. A wider repertoire of physical instruments is available than the keyboard and the mouse. Based on examples from recent research projects and a collage of concepts and solutions, we discuss how these recent developments challenge our understanding of usability and interaction design. In particular, we discuss how the Scandinavian tradition of user involvement in development is facing up with the challenges of new work and of non-work contexts. There is a tendency that much recent investigations into non-work settings get stuck in a divide between work on the one hand, and leisure, arts, and home on the other; between rationality on the hand, and emotion on the other. The Scandinavian tradition can be developed to embrace people's whole lives and transcend the dichotomies between work, rationality, etc. and their negations and a Scandinavian perspective should and could move the current co-determination framework outside of work.

  • 3.
    Engwall, Olov
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Öster, Anne-Marie
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Kjellström, Hedvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
    Designing the user interface of the computer-based speech training system ARTUR based on early user tests2006In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 353-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been performed in order to evaluate a prototype for the human - computer interface of a computer-based speech training aid named ARTUR. The main feature of the aid is that it can give suggestions on how to improve articulations. Two user groups were involved: three children aged 9 - 14 with extensive experience of speech training with therapists and computers, and three children aged 6, with little or no prior experience of computer-based speech training. All children had general language disorders. The study indicates that the present interface is usable without prior training or instructions, even for the younger children, but that more motivational factors should be introduced. The granularity of the mesh that classifies mispronunciations was satisfactory, but the flexibility and level of detail of the feedback should be developed further.

  • 4.
    Frykholm, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    References to personal experiences and scientific evidence during medical multi-disciplinary team meetings2011In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 455-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a field study of medical multi-disciplinary team meetings (MDTMs) where decisions are made concerning the diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from diseases in the upper abdomen. The study shows how evidence is referred to during weekly team meetings; this evidence is related both to scientific studies and to personal experiences of similar cases. We focus on the conversations during the meetings, on the complicated nature of the cases and on the details in the discussions that led the meeting participants to refer to scientific evidence or previous cases. We identify possibilities for improving the use of already documented information from medical records, in order to identify clinically relevant similarities and to bring additional information into the treatment discussion.

  • 5. Kane, Bridget
    et al.
    Groth, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Randall, Dave
    Medical team meetings: utilising technology to enhance communication, collaboration and decision-making2011In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 437-441Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kaulio, Matti
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Work Science.
    Karlsson, Marianne
    Chalmers.
    Triangulation Strategies in Customer Requirements Investigations: A Case Study on the Development of an IT-Mediated Service1998In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kjelldahl, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI.
    Schenkman, B. N.
    Colour induction on computer displays - adjacency and shape effects2007In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 261-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The perceived interactions, induction and assimilation between colours presented on a computer screen were investigated for seven participants who gave estimates on the perceived colours. A method based on memory estimation was used. In one experiment, a red - green scale was used, while in a second experiment a white - green scale was used. The distance between objects, shape of objects and colour of objects was varied. A distance effect of colour interaction was found in both experiments, but stronger for the red - green scale. For objects adjacent to each other the interaction effects were statistically significant. For objects not adjacent to each other some smaller effects occurred. No shape effects were found. Assimilation effects were shown for the red - green colour combinations. The participants seemed to use their own internal memory scale for their judgements. A theoretical model for distance effects of colour interaction is also presented.

  • 8.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Meetings in a distributed group of experts: comparing face-to-face, chat and collaborative virtual environments2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on Collaborative Virtual Environments, and their potential to support work meetings for geographically distributed experts. The research question concerns the difference between face-to-face-, chat-, and CVE-meetings with regard to efficiency, communication process, problems with the technology, enjoyment and competence development. A small group of experts were observed during their natural work meetings. Six of the groups scheduled meetings were held three times in a chat environment and three times in a CVE. Results suggests that chat and CVE meetings are experienced as more task oriented than face-to-face meetings, and that avatars support turn taking and are enjoyable.

  • 9.
    Larusdottir, Marta K.
    et al.
    Reykjavik Univ, Sch Comp Sci, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH.
    Hallberg, Niklas
    Swedish Def Res Agcy FOI, Linkoping, Sweden..
    RAMES - Framework supporting user centred evaluation in research and practice2019In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 132-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way to ensure good user experience of IT systems is to conduct user centred evaluation, aimed to provide feedback to IT professionals on their IT systems from the user perspective. The objective of this paper is to explore a conceptual framework, named RAMES that supports evaluators when planning, comparing and documenting user centred evaluations in a structured way. The framework structures the elements of an evaluation into five categories: Roles, Activities, Materials, Environments, and System. The framework was developed based on a theoretical analysis. Two explorative studies with 92 participants in total show that two thirds of the participants found it easy or rather easy to use the framework, and 33% find it likely that they would use the framework again. The conclusion of the studies is that frameworks such as RAMES enhance the implementation of user centred evaluations.

  • 10.
    Lárusdóttir, Marta K.
    et al.
    Reykjavik University.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala University.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Informal feedback rather than performance measurements: user-centred evaluation in Scrum projects2014In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1118-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main features of the Scrum process are intense communication between different stakeholders, and rapid feedback based on regular delivery of working software. The integration of traditional user-centred evaluation activities in this context is challenging. Hence, this paper presents an interview study of 21 informants, categorised in four different professional roles. The main contribution of the paper is an overview of the types of user-centred evaluation conducted by information technology professionals in various Scrum projects. Results show that various forms of feedback are indeed gathered on the usability and user experience of the software, system or service being developed. However, the user-centred evaluations conducted typically are informal with few users, gathering empirical qualitative data and performed during short unplanned sessions. Performance measurements gathering quantitative data are seldom used. The informants in the business specialist role merely ask users about their opinion, whereas the other roles use several user-centred evaluation activities to gather feedback on their design. Generally, feedback is gathered throughout the whole project, but often evaluation is conducted early in the project or even before the actual development starts. Finally, these results are discussed in relation to previous studies in the area.

  • 11.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Persson, Jenny
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Åborg, J.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Boivie, Inger
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Blomkvist, Stefan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Cajander, Åsa
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Göransson, Bengt
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Work environment and computer systems development2003In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 375-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work environment and occupational health problems of different nature are constantly increasing in computer supported work. Most efforts to improve the work environment are focused primarily on physical aspects, and to some extent on psychosocial aspects. Mental workload and cognitive problems are of a more complex nature, more difficult to measure and provide efficient solutions to, and are more seldom studied or solved. Solutions to work environment problems are usually applied to already existing work situations through improved equipment and work place design, health programmes, education, reorganizations, etc. The problems are seldom prevented by means of applying relevant methods early in the systems development process, before the artefacts have been designed and implemented. This paper, and the following papers of this special issue, will focus on the need to integrate different interdisciplinary methods at different phases in the development process of computerized support systems, with the ultimate goal to prevent work environment problems and decrease the health risks to the users.

  • 12.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Lenman, S.
    Five years' experience from CID: an interdisciplinary competence centre for design of usable interactive IT applications2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Centre for user oriented IT Design (CID) at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden was established in 1995. CID brings together researchers and designers from computer science, arts, media and communication, and human sciences with industry and user organizations. The focus is on the design and study of usable, interactive IT applications, integrating usability aspects, technical aspects and aesthetic aspects. The main themes of CID's activities are Connected communities, Interactive learning environments, Forms of interaction and User orientation, the latter which is also a central aspect of the work in the other areas. In this paper, experience from the first 5 years of CID is described and discussed.

  • 13.
    Taxén, Gustav
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Druin, Allison
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Fast, Carina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Kjellin, Marita
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    KidStory: a technology design partnership with children2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 119-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new design method that is used within the KidStory project to enable a large number of young children to participate as partners in the design of advanced storytelling technology. The method is an adaptation of the cooperative inquiry method for school environments and uses a combination of evaluation, brainstorming and traditional education methods. These activities have lead to the elaboration of new ideas, impacted the design of existing software and produced a number of interesting new technology designs.

  • 14.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Chincholle, D
    Klasson, B
    Stephanson, T
    VideoCafe - exploring mediaspaces in public places within organizations2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our studies of mediaspaces which are embedded within public places in organizations so as to examine the hypothesis that individuals might benefit even when working apart - from opportunities for light informal interaction. A set of full-scale prototypes were used and assessed over extensive periods of time. The informal observations and reflection in design of these places have been supplemented by formal studies. We found that great care needs to be taken when designing these places from an architectural point of view. For some of the places, we would like to suggest using architectural features when altering the room rather than technology. In other settings, the artful deployment of communication media might be more effective.

  • 15.
    Waern, Yvonne
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Malmsten, Nils
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Oestreicher, Lars
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Hjalmarsson, Ann
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Gidlöf Gunnarsson, Anita
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    Office automation and users need for support1991In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 501-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated a recently introduced office automation system at Swedish Telecom. In a first study, where 275 users answered an inventory, the users indicated that they found the system useful, but that they would like better user support. Paper and on-line support were most often used at the syntax level, but were not regarded to be very satisfactory. Human advisors were found to be consulted most often, as well as being reported the most satisfactory means of support at the task and conceptual levels. In an interview study concerning the electronic mail system, the results from 35 users showed that the users were satisfied with the system, but that they knew fairly little about it, particularly at the semantic level. A third study showed that the system support personnel knew their users rather well. When asked to describe the system, system support personnel mainly described the system in computer terms, whereas many other users described it non-informatively. It is concluded that knowledgeable human advisors are needed to support the efficient use of a system by illuminating task and semantic aspects. At the same time, easy-to-use manuals are needed to support the reminding about syntactic and interaction details.

  • 16.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Shared 3-D workplace exhibitions as sites for community meetings2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 91-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information exchange and communication in large, distributed organizations is a research project aimed at designing and testing shared, 3-D exhibition environments for geographically dispersed organizations. The research is associated with a long-term project sponsored by the National Swedish Trade Union Confederation (LO) in which a network for the exchange of organizational skills is created. The research project has tested the usefulness of 3-D environments as an extension of other communication services used in the LO-network, such as regional conferences, printed newsletters, email, electronic discussion forums, and websites. Two design workshops have been arranged in which 17 network members have learned how to build and navigate in the 3-D environment. The workshops resulted in the construction of an exhibition area where different design ideas were tested. Feedback from members was documented in videotaped interviews and an indication of the positive response is given through the groups ongoing additions to the exhibition site.

  • 17.
    Walldius, Åke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Exploring the use of design pattern maps for aligning new technical support to new clinical team meeting routines2013In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 68-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose the collaborative activity of mapping design patterns against stakeholder values as a viable method for grounding conceptual design of information and communication technology (ICT) services for heterogeneous sets of stakeholders. Preliminary experiences from designing a case book service for video-mediated gastro-medical team meetings are presented. A diverse set of stakeholders and the challenge to apply novel technologies in a demanding environment have placed more responsibility on the Human Computer Interaction (HCI) team to conceptualise new work practices and their expected effects than what traditional participatory design projects typically entail. By combining the methodologies of genre analysis and pattern languages, design pattern maps have been used to conceptualise solutions that span both work and interface aspects of the solution and that match declared values of the stakeholders concerned. A series of mapping sessions with different stakeholders helped the inter-disciplinary project team to better define, what stakeholder values called for what new work patterns and what kind of supporting interaction design patterns these new work patterns in turn called for.

  • 18.
    Walldius, Åke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Sundblad, Yngve
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, Center for Useroriented IT Design, CID.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Univ Gavle, Dept Ind Engn & Management, Gavle.
    Sandblad, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Human Comp Interact, Uppsala.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    Uppsala Universitet.
    User certification of workplace software: assessing both artefact and usage2009In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 101-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article summarises activities and results from the quality assessment project 'Quality Assurance of IT Support at Work' (ITQ) which has been performed by Swedish researchers in close cooperation with trade unions 1999-2005. The ITQ project is part of a network, UsersAward, which works for the goal to develop and implement a strategy for good software products on the work floor. A main result of the ITQ project is the first version of a software certification programme, User Certified 2002, which is described in some detail. The underlying theoretical arguments for its design and the performed pilot projects which have informed its implementation are also presented. The outcome of performed certifications is discussed in terms of stakeholder response; in terms of whether to certify artefact, processes, or both; and in terms of the relationship between software certification, standardisation, and public procurement agreements. One conclusion from the project is that a viable software certification programme has to cover the software's built-in features, its deployment process, and its actual situated usage. A second conclusion is that the buying organisation has to implement integrative processes in which its organisational development and its implementation of IT systems are coordinated. Conclusions are also drawn with respect to the set of organisational patterns underlying the UsersAward initiative-certifications, user panels, user surveys, user conferences and a yearly IT Prize contest. Finally, implications and plans for the future, especially international research and union cooperation activities, and further development of the certification process are described.

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