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  • 1.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Larsson, Rikard
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Vongvilai, Pornrapee
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Introducing Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: Probing the Substrate Selectivity of Acetylcholinesterase2010In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 87, no 11, p. 1248-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rahm, M.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gumaelius, Lena
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Rocket scientist for a day: Investigating alternatives for chemical propulsion2012In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1301-1304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This laboratory experiment introduces rocket science from a chemistry perspective. The focus is set on chemical propulsion, including its environmental impact and future development. By combining lecture-based teaching with practical, theoretical, and computational exercises, the students get to evaluate different propellant alternatives. To complete the task, they need to use several important curricular concepts, such as the breaking and formation of bonds, redox reactions, and thermodynamics. They also apply basic computational electronic structure calculations to investigate the energetic content of hitherto nonexisting alternatives. Finally, actual chemical rocket propulsion is demonstrated through the assembly and testing of a model rocket motor, employing a commercially available kit. The full experiment was developed for upper-level high school classes and is completed in a 3-h lab period. The experiment, or parts of it, has also been successfully used both in undergraduate programs and continuing education for teachers. 

  • 3.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Making a Chemical Rainbow2010In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 87, no 5, p. 504-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this laboratory experiment, high school students are challenged to prepare a six-layered chemical "rainbow" in a test tube. Students start with six unknown, colorless liquids and six pigments ranging from violet to red. The experiment is problem based and forces the students to apply their knowledge of solubility and density and combine it with creative and critical thinking to come up with a successful strategy to make the rainbow. This is followed by experimental testing to find the unique solution. Finally, coloring and correct layering of the liquids produces the final and aesthetically pleasing result, a chemical rainbow.

  • 4.
    Angelin, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Where's Ester? A Game That Seeks the Structures Hiding Behind the Trivial Names2010In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 87, no 4, p. 406-407Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Cuartero, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Crespo, Gaston A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Using Potentiometric Electrodes Based on Nonselective Polymeric Membranes as Potential Universal Detectors for Ion Chromatography: Investigating an Original Research Problem from an Inquiry-Based-Learning Perspective2018In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 95, no 12, p. 2172-2181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because traditional laboratory practices in advanced chemistry education are being replaced by inquiry based approaches, we present herein a new laboratory activity based on a small research project that was designed and executed by students. The laboratory project aims at answering a well-defined research question: how far can potentiometric electrodes based on nonselective polymeric membranes be used as universal detectors in ion chromatography (IC)? Hence, the experiments were designed and conducted to explore the analytical performances of potentiometric electrodes based on different commercial membranes that are typically used in electrodialysis. The nonselective behavior shown by the electrodes permits a critical evaluation of their further implementation as a universal detector of anions in regular IC. Thus, the students were able to integrate a nonselective potentiometric sensor to analyze several anions in flow mode, mimicking the signal that is to be obtained using such electrodes as an IC detector. The proposed practice covers different pedagogical purposes: (i) to develop competence toward "thinking like a scientist" through reflective teaching; (ii) to promote argumentation skills and critical decision making; (iii) to improve students' research-planning and experimental-design skills; (iv) to refresh conceptual knowledge about analytical detectors, which typically goes unnoticed in laboratory practices; and (v) to reinforce students' knowledge about the basis of potentiometry. Furthermore, the present document may serve as an easy guide to develop other laboratory practices based on potentiometric sensors.

  • 6.
    Henriksson, Ulf
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Eriksson, J. C.
    Thermodynamics of capillary rise: Why is the meniscus curved?2004In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 150-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Johansson, Adam Johannes
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Inga Fischer-Hjalmars (1918-2008): Swedish pharmacist, humanist, and pioneer quantum chemist2012In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 89, no 10, p. 1274-1279Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide variety of questions can be asked about the molecules that compose the physical reality around us and constitute biological life. Some of these questions are answered by the science called biology, others find their answer in chemistry, whereas the answers to the most fundamental questions are only to be found in the theories of physics. Inga Fischer-Hjalmars (born Fischer) belonged to the rare group of scientists who asked questions of all these kinds. Her life and career is a fascinating story of devotion, strive, and an unyielding curiosity about nature. As a young pharmacist, she had a central role in the development of the local anesthetic Xylocaine (also known as lidocaine), but the major part of her career was dedicated to explain the biological, chemical, and physical properties of molecules using the most fundamental principles available: quantum mechanics. Inga Fischer-Hjalmars was a pioneer in applying quantum mechanics to chemical problems, and she became the first female professor in theoretical physics in Sweden. Beside her scientific work, Inga Fischer-Hjalmars was a human rights activist dedicated to the freedom of oppositional and Jewish scientists in the Soviet Union. For this engagement, she was awarded with the New York Academy of Science's Human Rights of Scientists Award in 1990.

  • 8.
    Johansson, Adam Johannes
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Teaching the jahn-teller theorem: A simple exercise that illustrates how the magnitude of distortion depends on the number of electrons and their occupation of the degenerate energy level2013In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching the Jahn-Teller theorem offers several challenges. For many students, the first encounter comes in coordination chemistry, which can be difficult due to the already complicated nature of transition-metal complexes. Moreover, a deep understanding of the Jahn-Teller theorem requires that one is well acquainted with quantum mechanics and group theory. A comparatively simple way to illustrate the anatomy of the Jahn-Teller effect is presented here. Chemistry teachers are reminded of a sometimes forgotten aspect, namely, that the orbital degeneracy itself is not a sufficient criterion for the Jahn-Teller effect to appear, it is necessary that the occupation of the degenerate energy level is asymmetric. The article can serve as an introduction to the Jahn-Teller theorem, either as a lecture or as a computational exercise.

  • 9. Neel, Bastien
    et al.
    Crespo, Gaston A.
    Perret, Didier
    Cherubini, Thomas
    Bakker, Eric
    Camping Burner-Based Flame Emission Spectrometer for Classroom Demonstrations2014In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 1655-1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A flame emission spectrometer was built in-house for the purpose of introducing this analytical technique to students at the high school level. The aqueous sample is sprayed through a homemade nebulizer into the air inlet of a consumer-grade propane camping burner. The resulting flame is analyzed by a commercial array spectrometer for the visible spectrum in the range of 350-1000 nm. The cost of the instrument is mainly given by that of the spectrometer and computer/projector. The obtained emission spectrum is characteristic of each individual atom, such as sodium (589 nm) and potassium (766 nm), or molecule, such as calcium hydroxide (554 and 622 nm). The readout signal (either peak height or peak area) is shown to be proportional to the sample concentration. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed with this robust and low-cost device. Samples can be rapidly changed, giving a 95% response time of under 3 s. The analytical figures of merit were characterized for calcium, potassium, and sodium in different water samples, and the resulting precision (standard deviation) for a 1 s acquisition time was typically on the order of 2%. Observed calcium levels were lower than expected because of the presence of refractory compounds, such as calcium phosphate or sulfate, that are difficult to fully atomize with the simple flame used here. Lanthanum(III) chloride was successfully used to increase the calcium response. The lower limit of detection for sodium was approximately 3 ppb and comparable to that of conventional commercial emission spectrometers.

  • 10. Olsson, L. F.
    et al.
    Kloo, Lars A.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Electron pairing, repulsion, and correlation: A simplistic approach2004In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 138-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Timmer, Brian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Schaufelberger, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Hammarberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Franzen, Johan.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Dinér, Peter
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Simple and Effective Integration of Green Chemistry and Sustainability Education into an Existing Organic Chemistry Course2018In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 95, no 8, p. 1301-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Green chemistry and sustainable development have become increasingly important topics for the education of future chemists. The cross-disciplinary nature of green chemistry and sustainable development often means these subjects are taught in conjunction with other subjects, such as organic chemistry and chemical engineering. Herein, a straightforward and efficient approach for vertical integration of green chemistry concepts within existing undergraduate organic chemistry courses is shown. The gradual self-evaluation, "greenification", and reassessment of an organic chemistry course at KTH Royal Institute of Technology from 2013 to 2017 is described, with particular focus on the laboratory course and a novel green chemistry project designed to promote sustainability thinking and reasoning. The laboratory project, which can also be conducted as an independent organic chemistry laboratory exercise, required students to critically evaluate variations of the same Pechmann condensation experiment according to the twelve principles of green chemistry. The course evaluation shows that, after the modifications, students feel more comfortable with the topics "green chemistry" and "sustainability" and consider these topics more important for their future careers. Furthermore, the ability of students to discuss and critically evaluate green chemistry parameters improved considerably as determined from the laboratory project reports.

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