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  • 1.
    Dunér, Gunnar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Thormann, Esben
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Ramström, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Friction between Surfaces—Polyacrylic Acid Brush and Silica—Mediated by Calcium Ions2010In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 31, p. 1285-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With this letter, we report how friction can be controlled by inducing physical bonds solely within a polyelectrolyte brush layer, while keeping repulsive interactions between the brush layer and the bare surface that slides above. Our results imply that the nature of the bare surface is of minor importance as long as the repulsive surface interaction is maintained.

  • 2.
    Ejenstam, Lina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Swerin, Agne
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Towards superhydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane-silica particle coatings2016In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 1375-1383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophobized silica nanoparticles of different sizes, from 16 to 500 nm, were used to impart roughness to a hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating with the aim of obtaining superhydrophobic properties. The particle silanization process and the curing process of the PDMS coating were optimized to increase the contact angle of the particle containing coating. The evaluation of the coatings, by means of water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy imaging, show that superhydrophobicity in the adhesive rose state was achieved using combinations of two differently sized particles, with an excess of the small 16 nm ones. Superhydrophobicity in the Lotus state was obtained when the filler concentration of 16 nm particles was 40 wt%, but under such conditions the coating was found to partially crack, which is detrimental in barrier applications. The preference for the rose wetting state can be explained by the round shape of the particles, which promotes the superhydrophobic rose wetting state over that of the superhydrophobic Lotus state.

  • 3.
    He, Yunjuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Boluk, Yaman
    Univ Alberta, Dept Civil & Environm Engn, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Ahniyaz, Anwar
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Deltin, Tomas
    PTE Coatings AB, Gamleby, Sweden..
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Comparative study of CNC and CNF as additives in waterborne acrylate-based anti-corrosion coatings2019In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocomposite coatings are of great interest as barrier coatings since synergy effects between matrix and additive properties can be achieved. This, however, requires favorable additive-matrix interactions to provide a strong interphase (interface region). In this work we elucidate the properties of two environmentally benign nanocomposite coatings based on a waterborne acrylate formulation with additives from renewable sources, i.e. either cellulose nanocrystals, CNC; or, alternatively, cellulose nanofibrils, CNF. We focus on the corrosion protective properties of these coatings and discuss the reason why the nanocomposite with CNC displays favorable corrosion protection properties whereas that with CNF does not. To this end we utilized scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques to investigate the microstructure, surface wetting, interactions between cellulosic materials and matrix as well as corrosion protective properties of both composite coatings.

  • 4.
    Naderi, Ali
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Association between poly(vinylamine) and sodium dodecyl sulfate: Effects of mixing protocol, blending procedure, and salt concentration2005In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 329-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association between a weak cationic linear polyelectrolyte, poly(vinylamine), and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been investigated in dilute solutions, containing 20 ppm of poly(vinylamine) and surfactant up to a concentration of 8 mM. We particularly focus on the importance of the order of addition of the components and of stirring after mixing. Two mixing protocols were used, denoted PTS and STP. In the PTS method the polyelectrolyte is added to the surfactant solution, and in the STP method the surfactant is added into the polyelectrolyte solution. The results obtained demonstrate the presence of long-lived trapped nonequilibrium states. In addition, we also address the effect of the blending procedure on association. We studied two blending methods, denoted Blending and Vigorous Blending. In the Blending method equal volumes of the polyelectrolyte and surfactant were added simultaneously to the sample tube, after which the ingredients were mixed together by turning the sample tube upside down a few times; in the Vigorous Blending method the mixing was provided by a magnetic stirrer. The results, obtained using turbidity, electrophoretic mobility, and light scattering measurements, demonstrate that Vigorous Blending facilitates flocculation at low SDS concentrations, close to the charge neutralization concentration of the system. This is interpreted as being due to additional surfactant incorporation in initially positively charged complexes during collision events. Vigorous mixing in excess surfactant produces stable dispersions consisting of small negatively charged complexes containing one polyelectrolyte and surfactant in excess of what is needed to neutralize the polyelectrolyte charges. The same results are obtained with the Blending protocol, which gives comparable particle size and polydispersity in excess surfactant and polyelectrolyte.

  • 5.
    Rippner Blomqvist, Brita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    Folke, Sandra
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry (closed 20081231).
    The stabilization of aqueous PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer foam2006In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 469-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Foam generated by sparging of aqueous solutions of the block copolymers P85 (PEO26-PPO39-PEO26), F88 (PEO103-PPO40-PEO103), F127 (PEO99-PPO (65)-PEO99), and L64 (PEO13-PPO30-PEO13), has been characterized by foam volume measurements. Uniform wet foam formed, which, after drainage of the major part of the liquid, transformed to polyhedral dry foam. Conductance jumps across the foam column indicated that structural changes occur at a certain liquid fraction. The dry foams of P85 were less stable than those of F88 and F127. The latter copolymers showed similar foam stability over a period of one hour. The L64 foam was very unstable. It is suggested that the stability of the dry foams is determined by the resistance to rupture of the foam films. Foam stability is discussed in relation to earlier studies on surface rheology and to the thickness of thin foam films. A general relationship for all PEOx-PPOy-PEOx block copolymers between the dilatational modulus and the foam stability could not be found. However, the ability to form thick adsorption layers, accompanied by steric repulsive forces across foam films, appears to be a general foam-stabilizing factor. Surface diffusion coefficients of a fluorescent probe in single-block copolymers foam films are also reported for a brief discussion on Gibbs-Marangoni stabilization.

  • 6.
    Rippner Blomqvist, Brita
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Wilde, P.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Competitive destabilization/stabilization of beta-lactoglobulin foam by PEO-PPO-PEO polymeric surfactants2006In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 527-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect on ss-lactoglobulin foamability and foam stability of the poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymers F127 (PEO99-PPO65-PEO99), molecular weight 12500 g/mol, and P85 (PEO26-PPO39-PEO26), molecular weight 4600 g/mol, has been investigated at constant protein concentration, 10 mu M (0.2 mg/L), and varying block copolymer concentrations, ranging from 0.02 to 1600 mu M. Foam was generated by means of air sparging and the foam volume and liquid volume of the foam were measured for one hour. It was found that foam stabilized by F127 or P85 in the concentration range 20-1600 mu M contained a larger liquid volume initially than pure ss-lactoglobulin foam. Furthermore, ss-lactoglobulin foamability was only marginally affected by the presence of F127, while it was reduced in an interval of low P85 concentrations. The protein foam stability was retained in the presence of the larger polymer F127, whereas P85 largely reduced the stability, indicating that the size of the polymeric surfactant is important. The results are discussed in relation to surface rheological properties and forces acting across foam films. Steric repulsion generated between the surfaces of foam films is suggested to be the main stabilizing factor in dry foam containing F127. The instability of the mixed ss-lactoglobulin/P85 system is suggested to be caused by two effects. First, there are incompatible stabilization mechanisms of block copolymer and protein, as supported by previous surface rheological data. Second, there is a reduced importance of long-range steric repulsion when P85 is added, compared to the case where F127 and ss-lactoglobulin are mixed.

  • 7. Sanchez-Dominguez, M.
    et al.
    Koleilat, H.
    Boutonnet, Magali
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chemical Technology.
    Solans, C.
    Synthesis of Pt Nanoparticles in oil-in-water microemulsions: Phase Behavior and Effect of Formulation Parameters on Nanoparticle Characteristics2011In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 1765-1770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pt nanoparticles were synthesized in oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions, in contrast to the typically used water-in-oil microemulsion method. The new strategy implies the use of a Pt organometallic precursor (1,5-cyclooctadiene dimethyl platinum (II)), dissolved in nanometre-scale oil droplets, stabilized by surfactant, and dispersed in a continuous aqueous phase. Three different nonionic microemulsion systems were used. Characterization studies demonstrate that small, nanocrystalline Pt nanoparticles were obtained. The particle size and agglomeration was dependant on the microemulsion system used and its composition. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach for the controlled synthesis of Pt nanoparticles with potential for catalytic purposes.

  • 8.
    Seppänen, Rauni
    YKI, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Stockholm.
    Durability of the Sizing Degree of AKD and ASA Sized Papers Investigated by Contact Angle Measurements and ToF-SIMS2009In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of storage conditions on the sizing degree of AKD and ASA sized pilot papers was evaluated. A number of pilot papers sized with AKD or ASA were prepared from ECF bleached pulp fibers, unfilled and filled with 20% PCC, respectively and investigated in terms of sizing degree over a period of several months. The papers were stored at 23C and 50% RH either wrapped in aluminium foil or as separate sheets exposed to open atmosphere. The unfilled papers stored protected from ambient atmosphere after papermaking showed only a marginal reduction in sizing during prolonged storage. Only the paper having the lowest AKD-dosage suffered from reduced water-resistance, the Cobb60-value changed from 34 to 79g/m2. The PCC filled papers stored in the same conditions lost some of their sizing, to a higher extent in the case of AKD than for ASA sized papers. This was attributed to the further hydrolysis of the size catalyzed by PCC. In comparison, the sizing of the papers stored as separate sheets dropped significantly even after a few weeks in storage. In the end of the storage the AKD papers, particularly the unfilled ones had lost their sizing efficiency to a clearly higher extent than the ASA papers. The reduction in the sizing level occurred mainly during the first five weeks for the unfilled ASA and AKD papers, after which the process continued at a slower rate. The ToF-SIMS analysis revealed that both AKD and hydrolyzed AKD, the latter being the major portion, were present at the outermost surface of the unfilled AKD sized papers, but in significantly lower levels than in the case of the corresponding protected papers. In other words, a significant loss of AKD mass had occurred for the papers exposed to an open atmosphere. This was attributed to migration of AKD. The results demonstrated that ASA sized papers also suffered from size loss. The ToF-SIMS results showed no signal for active, nonbonded ASA and instead clear signals were observed for hydrolyzed ASA and for calcium and aluminium. As in the papers wrapped in aluminium foil, ASA was mainly in its hydrolyzed form. Although to a markedly lower extent, the reason for sizing loss in the case of ASA was the same as for AKD.

  • 9.
    Shovsky, Alexander V.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Makuska, R.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface Chemistry.
    Formation and Stability of Soluble Stochiometric Polyelectrolyte Complexes: Effects of Charge Density and Polyelectrolyte Concentration2009In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 980-988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sterically stabilized polyelectrolyte complexes with stoichiometric composition between oppositely charged synthetic polyelectrolytes carrying strong ionic groups and significantly different molecular weights have been prepared. Poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (NaPSS) was used as polyanion and a range of brush copolymers with various molar ratio (X=1, 0.75, 0.5, 0.25) of the poly-methacryloxyethyl trimethylammonium chloride poly(METAC) and the nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) methyl ether methacrylate poly(PEO45MEMA) were used as polycations. Formation and stability of PECs have been investigated by dynamic and static light scattering (LS), turbidity and electrophoretic mobility measurements as a function of polyelectrolyte solution concentration and charge density of the cationic polyelectrolyte. The data obtained suggest that the PEO45- rich systems, NaPSS/PEO45MEMA:METAC-25 and NaPSS/PEO45MEMA:METAC-50, form small, water-soluble, molecular complexes having nonspherical shape. The PEO45-poor NaPSS/PEG45MEMA:METAC-75 form turbid colloidal dispersions, whereas insoluble PECs were revealed for the PEO45-free NaPSS/METAC system. The aggregation level of the PEO45-poor systems is mainly controlled by the concentration of the component solutions used for the preparation of PECs, whereas the aggregation of PEO45-rich nanoparticles is prevented by means of steric stabilization. Electrophoretic mobility data indicate a close to charge neutral state of the generated polyelectrolyte complexes.

  • 10.
    Sörensen, M. H.
    et al.
    YKI, Institute for Surface Chemistry.
    Samoshina, Yulia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Per, Claesson
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Alberius, Peter
    YKI, Institute for Surface Chemistry.
    Sustained Release of Ibuprofen from Polyelectrolyte Encapsulated Mesoporous Carriers2009In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 892-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers are receiving much attention due to their insoly. and due to structural responses induced in them by changes in soln. properties such as, for example, temp., pH or ionic strength.  These characteristics make polyelectrolyte multilayers highly interesting in encapsulation technol. and controlled delivery applications.  However, producing dry, biocompatible formulations for storage of low mol. wt. substances poses a challenge.  One possibility is to make use of a well-defined mesoporous inorg. carrier material as host for the model substance (in the authors' case ibuprofen).  Control over release properties are enabled by polyelectrolyte encapsulation of the inorg. carrier.  The authors built such multilayers through consecutive deposition of PAH and PSS on top of a first layer of PEI.  These layers were adsorbed either in presence or absent of ibuprofen.  The influence of long time storage, 2 years, of the samples was also investigated.  The polyelectrolyte multilayer structure was investigated in detail by Dual Polarization Interferometry (DPI), and the authors use these data to interpret the measured release profiles.

  • 11. Zhang, S. W.
    et al.
    Ren, L.
    Lv, H. X.
    Zhu, F. P.
    Zhang, M. Y.
    Yao, Kun
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Synthesis of narrowly distributed polystyrene-encapsulated silica nanoparticles via emulsion polymerization2017In: Journal of Dispersion Science and Technology, ISSN 0193-2691, E-ISSN 1532-2351, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 451-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polystyrene (PS)-encapsulated silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by conventional emulsion polymerization for solving the aggregation matter of nanoscaled silica. The grafting coupling agents and PS on the silica surface were detected by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The influence of silica and monomer to water ratios and initiator concentration on particle size distribution of the nanocomposite latex was investigated. The particle size distribution firstly narrowed and then broadened with the increase of silica and monomer to water ratios and initiator concentration. The narrow distribution could be controlled in an appropriate silica and monomer to water ratio and an initiator concentration of 1/15 and 2wt%, respectively. From the evaluation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement, it was proved that the nanocomposite latex did not have all sphere-like shape, but contained tiny amounts of irregular bodies. The formation mechanism of PS-encapsulated silica nanoparticles was also discussed.

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