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  • 1. Bainsla, L.
    et al.
    Kumar, A.
    Awad, A. A.
    Wang, Chunlei
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Zahedinejad, M.
    Behera, N.
    Fulara, H.
    Khymyn, R.
    Houshang, A.
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Åkerman, J.
    Ultrathin Ferrimagnetic GdFeCo Films with Low Damping2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 23, p. 2111693-, article id 2111693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ferromagnetic materials dominate as the magnetically active element in spintronic devices, but come with drawbacks such as large stray fields and low operational frequencies. Compensated ferrimagnets provide an alternative as they combine the ultrafast magnetization dynamics of antiferromagnets with a ferromagnet-like spin-orbit-torque behavior. However, to use ferrimagnets in spintronic devices their advantageous properties must be retained also in ultrathin films (t < 10 nm). In this study, ferrimagnetic Gdx(Fe87.5Co12.5)1−x thin films in the thickness range t = 2–20 nm are grown on high resistance Si(100) substrates and studied using broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements at room temperature. By tuning their stoichiometry, a nearly compensated behavior is observed in 2 nm Gdx(Fe87.5Co12.5)1−x ultrathin films for the first time, with an effective magnetization of (Formula presented.) = 0.02 T and a low effective Gilbert damping constant of α = 0.0078, comparable to the lowest values reported so far in 30 nm films. These results show great promise for the development of ultrafast and energy efficient ferrimagnetic spintronic devices.

  • 2. Cao, W.
    et al.
    Yin, S.
    Bitsch, M.
    Liang, S.
    Plank, M.
    Opel, M.
    Scheel, M. A.
    Gallei, M.
    Janka, O.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany..
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    In Situ Study of FePt Nanoparticles-Induced Morphology Development during Printing of Magnetic Hybrid Diblock Copolymer Films2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 2107667-, article id 2107667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of magnetic hybrid films containing diblock copolymers (DBCs) and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) by printing is a highly promising method for scalable and low-cost fabrication. During printing, the drying and arrangement kinetics of the DBC and magnetic NPs play an important role in the film formation concerning morphology and magnetic properties. In this study, the morphology evolution of ultrahigh molecular weight DBC polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) and magnetic iron platinum (FePt) NPs is investigated with grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) in situ during printing. For comparison, a pure DBC film is printed without FePt NPs under the same conditions. The GISAXS data suggest that the addition of NPs accelerates the solvent evaporation, leading to a faster film formation of the hybrid film compared to the pure film. As the solvent is almost evaporated, a metastable state is observed in both films. Compared with the pure film, such a metastable state continues longer during the printing process of the hybrid film because of the presence of FePt NPs, which inhibits the reorganization of the DBC chains. Moreover, investigations of the field-dependent magnetization and temperature-dependent susceptibility indicate that the printed hybrid film is superparamagnetic, which makes this film class promising for magnetic sensors.

  • 3. Chen, Q.
    et al.
    Betker, Marie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany.
    Harder, C.
    Brett, Calvin J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Ulrich, N. M.
    Toimil-Molares, M. E.
    Trautmann, C.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Weindl, C. L.
    Körstgens, V.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    Ma, M.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, 22607, Germany.
    Biopolymer-Templated Deposition of Ordered and Polymorph Titanium Dioxide Thin Films for Improved Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Sensitivity2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 6, article id 2108556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an excellent candidate material for semiconductor metal oxide-based substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Biotemplated fabrication of TiO2 thin films with a 3D network is a promising route for effectively transferring the morphology and ordering of the template into the TiO2 layer. The control over the crystallinity of TiO2 remains a challenge due to the low thermal stability of biopolymers. Here is reported a novel strategy of the cellulose nanofibril (CNF)-directed assembly of TiO2/CNF thin films with tailored morphology and crystallinity as SERS substrates. Polymorphous TiO2/CNF thin films with well-defined morphology are obtained by combining atomic layer deposition and thermal annealing. A high enhancement factor of 1.79 × 106 in terms of semiconductor metal oxide nanomaterial (SMON)-based SERS substrates is obtained from the annealed TiO2/CNF thin films with a TiO2 layer thickness of 10 nm fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO), when probed by 4-mercaptobenzoic acid molecules. Common SERS probes down to 10 nm can be detected on these TiO2/CNF substrates, indicating superior sensitivity of TiO2/CNF thin films among SMON SERS substrates. This improvement in SERS sensitivity is realized through a cooperative modulation of the template morphology of the CNF network and the crystalline state of TiO2.

  • 4. Chen, Q.
    et al.
    Sochor, B.
    Chumakov, A.
    Betker, Marie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Ulrich, N. M.
    Toimil-Molares, M. E.
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose-Reinforced Programmable and Stretch-Healable Actuators for Smart Packaging2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 49, p. 2208074-, article id 2208074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomimetic actuators are promising candidates for smart soft robotics. The applications of state-of-the-art actuators require the combination of programmable stimuli-responsiveness, excellent robustness, and efficient self-healing ability in a wide-range of working conditions. However, these properties may be mutually exclusive. Inspired by biological tissues, two kinds of polyelectrolytes including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) are exploited as the fillers of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) for the fabrication of the CNF/PVA/PSS (CAS) film via the assembly of the physically-crosslinked network through multiple H-bonding and electrostatic interactions. Achieved by a casting-evaporation strategy, internal stress is stored within the polymer matrix and transforms into reversible anisotropic bending deformations in response to a humidity gradient. The speed, direction, and pitch of the bending can be programmed by tailoring the internal stresses and geometry of the samples. Moreover, the H-bonded network also contributes to the effective energy dissipation toward high toughness during tensile stretching, as well as self-healing ability during moisture saturation of the CAS films. This enables the fabrication of a humidity-sensitive flower-shaped actuator and self-healable packaging paper. This study presents a biomimetic strategy for the fabrication of multi-functional soft robotics, which holds great promise for applications in the fields of biosensors and smart packaging. 

  • 5.
    Cooper, Thomas M.
    et al.
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Haley, Joy E.
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Stewart, David J.
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Long, Stephanie
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Krein, Douglas M.
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Burke, Aaron R.
    Air Force Res Lab, Mat & Mfg Directorate, Dayton, OH 45433 USA..
    Arias, Eduardo
    Ctr Invest Quim Aplicada CIQA, Blvd Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo 25294, Coahuila, Mexico..
    Moggio, Ivana
    Ctr Invest Quim Aplicada CIQA, Blvd Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo 25294, Coahuila, Mexico..
    Turlakov, Gleb
    Ctr Invest Quim Aplicada CIQA, Blvd Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo 25294, Coahuila, Mexico..
    Ziolo, Ronald F.
    Ctr Invest Quim Aplicada CIQA, Blvd Enrique Reyna 140, Saltillo 25294, Coahuila, Mexico..
    Biler, Michal
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Linares, Mathieu
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Norman, Patrick
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Nanoscale Organization of a Platinum(II) Acetylide Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Molecular Glass for Photonics Applications2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 28, article id 1910562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fabrication, molecular structure, and spectroscopy of a stable cholesteric liquid crystal platinum acetylide glass obtained from trans-Pt(PEt3)(2)(C(sic)C-C6H5-C(sic)N)(C(sic)C-C6H5-COO-Cholesterol), are described and designated as PE1-CN-Chol. Polarized optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments show room temperature glassy/crystalline texture with crystal formation upon heating to 165 degrees C. Further heating results in conversion to cholesteric phase. Cooling to room temperature leads to the formation of a cholesteric liquid crystal glass. Scanning tunneling microscopy of a PE1-CN-Chol monolayer reveals self-assembly at the solid-liquid interface with an array of two molecules arranged in pairs, oriented head-to-head through the CN groups, giving rise to a lamella arrangement. The lamella structure obtained from molecular dynamics calculations shows a clear phase separation between the conjugated platinum acetylide and the hydrophobic cholesterol moiety with the lamellae separation distance being 4.0 nm. Ultrafast transient absorption and flash photolysis spectra of the glass show intersystem crossing to the triplet state occurring within 100 ps following excitation. The triplet decay time of the film compared to aerated and deoxygenated solutions is consistent with oxygen quenching at the film surface but not within the film. The high chromophore concentration, high glass thermal stability, and long triplet lifetime in air show that these materials have potential as nonlinear absorbing materials.

  • 6.
    Dev, Apurba
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Dev Choudhury, Bikash
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Abedin, Ahmad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Anand, Srinivasan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Fabrication of Periodic Nanostructure Assemblies by Interfacial Energy Driven Colloidal Lithography2014In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 24, no 29, p. 4577-4583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel interfacial energy driven colloidal lithography technique to fabricate periodic patterns from solution-phase is presented and the feasibility and versatility of the technique is demonstrated by fabricating periodically arranged ZnO nanowire ensembles on Si substrates. The pattern fabrication method exploits different interfaces formed by sol-gel derived ZnO seed solution on a hydrophobic Si surface covered by a monolayer of colloidal silica spheres. While the hydrophobic Si surface prevents wetting by the seed solution, the wedge shaped regions surrounding the contact point between the colloidal particles and the Si substrate trap the solution due to interfacial forces. This technique allows fabrication of uniform 2D micropatterns of ZnO seed particles on the Si substrate. A hydrothermal technique is then used to grow well-defined periodic assemblies of ZnO nanowires. Tunability is demonstrated in the dimensions of the patterns by using silica spheres with different diameters. The experimental data show that the periodic ZnO nanowire assembly suppresses the total reflectivity of bare Si by more than a factor of 2 in the wavelength range 400-1300 nm. Finite-difference time-domain simulations of the wavelength-dependent reflectivity show good qualitative agreement with the experiments. The demonstrated method is also applicable for other materials synthesized by solution chemistry.

  • 7.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Brett, Calvin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Körstgens, V.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    Ohm, W.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Core–Shell Nanoparticle Interface and Wetting Properties2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 15, article id 1907720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Latex colloids are among the most promising materials for broad thin film applications due to their facile surface functionalization. Yet, the effect of these colloids on chemical film and wetting properties cannot be easily evaluated. At the nanoscale, core–shell particles can deform and coalesce during thermal annealing, yielding fine-tuned physical properties. Two different core–shell systems (soft and rigid) with identical shells but with chemically different core polymers and core sizes are investigated. The core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) are probed during thermal annealing in order to investigate their behavior as a function of nanostructure size and rigidity. X-ray scattering allows to follow the re-arrangement of the NPs and the structural evolution in situ during annealing. Evaluation by real-space imaging techniques reveals a disappearance of the structural integrity and a loss of NP boundaries. The possibility to fine-tune the wettability by tuning the core–shell NPs morphology in thin films provides a facile template methodology for repellent surfaces.

  • 8. Fang, Yeyu
    et al.
    Dumas, R. K.
    Nguyen Thi Ngooc, Ahn
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Mohseni, Seyed Majid
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Chung, Sunjae
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Miller, C. W.
    Åkerman, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    A Nonvolatile Spintronic Memory Element with a Continuum of Resistance States2013In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 23, no 15, p. 1919-1922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A continuum of stable remanent resistance states is reported in perpendicularly magnetized pseudo spin valves with a graded anisotropy free layer. The resistance states can be systematically set by an externally applied magnetic field. The gradual reversal of the free layer with applied field and the field-independent fixed layer leads to a range of stable and reproducible remanent resistance values, as determined by the giant magnetoresistance of the device. An analysis of first-order reversal curves combined with magnetic force microscopy shows that the origin of the effect is the field-dependent population of up and down domains in the free layer.

  • 9.
    Fischer, Andreas C.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Belova, Lyubov M.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics.
    Malm, Gunnar B.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Radamson, Henry
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Gylfason, Kristinn B.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    Niklaus, Frank
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Microsystem Technology.
    3D Free-Form Patterning of Silicon by Ion Implantation, Silicon Deposition, and Selective Silicon Etching2012In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 22, no 19, p. 4004-4008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for additive layer-by-layer fabrication of arbitrarily shaped 3D silicon micro- and nanostructures is reported. The fabrication is based on alternating steps of chemical vapor deposition of silicon and local implantation of gallium ions by focused ion beam (FIB) writing. In a final step, the defined 3D structures are formed by etching the silicon in potassium hydroxide (KOH), in which the local ion implantation provides the etching selectivity. The method is demonstrated by fabricating 3D structures made of two and three silicon layers, including suspended beams that are 40 nm thick, 500 nm wide, and 4 μm long, and patterned lines that are 33 nm wide.

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  • 10.
    Francon, Hugo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Marais, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mystek, Katarzyna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Piper, Andrew
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Innventia AB, Papermaking & Packaging, Box 5604, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malti, Abdellah
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Gatenholm, Paul
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Dept Chem & Chem Engn, Kemigarden 4, SE-41269 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Fibre & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 58, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ambient-Dried, 3D-Printable and Electrically Conducting Cellulose Nanofiber Aerogels by Inclusion of Functional Polymers2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 12, article id 1909383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents a novel, green, and efficient way of preparing crosslinked aerogels from cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) and alginate using non-covalent chemistry. This new process can ultimately facilitate the fast, continuous, and large-scale production of porous, light-weight materials as it does not require freeze-drying, supercritical CO2 drying, or any environmentally harmful crosslinking chemistries. The reported preparation procedure relies solely on the successive freezing, solvent-exchange, and ambient drying of composite CNF-alginate gels. The presented findings suggest that a highly-porous structure can be preserved throughout the process by simply controlling the ionic strength of the gel. Aerogels with tunable densities (23-38 kg m(-3)) and compressive moduli (97-275 kPa) can be prepared by using different CNF concentrations. These low-density networks have a unique combination of formability (using molding or 3D-printing) and wet-stability (when ion exchanged to calcium ions). To demonstrate their use in advanced wet applications, the printed aerogels are functionalized with very high loadings of conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate (PEDOT:TOS) polymer by using a novel in situ polymerization approach. In-depth material characterization reveals that these aerogels have the potential to be used in not only energy storage applications (specific capacitance of 78 F g(-1)), but also as mechanical-strain and humidity sensors.

  • 11.
    Garemark, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ram, Farsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Liu, Lianlian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Sapouna, Ioanna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Cortes Ruiz, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Advancing Hydrovoltaic Energy Harvesting from Wood through Cell Wall Nanoengineering2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, p. 2208933-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Converting omnipresent environmental energy through the assistance of spontaneous water evaporation is an emerging technology for sustainable energy systems. Developing bio-based hydrovoltaic materials further pushes the sustainability, where wood is a prospect due to its native hydrophilic and anisotropic structure. However, current wood-based water evaporation-assisted power generators are facing the challenge of low power density. Here, an efficient hydrovoltaic wood power generator is reported based on wood cell wall nanoengineering. A highly porous wood with cellulosic network filling the lumen is fabricated through a green, one-step treatment using sodium hydroxide to maximize the wood surface area, introduce chemical functionality, and enhance the cell wall permeability of water. An open-circuit potential of ≈140 mV in deionized water is realized, over ten times higher than native wood. Further tuning the pH difference between wood and water, due to an ion concentration gradient, a potential up to 1 V and a remarkable power output of 1.35 µW cm−2 is achieved. The findings in this study provide a new strategy for efficient wood power generators.

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  • 12.
    Granskog, Viktor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Andren, Oliver C. J.
    Cai, Yanling
    Gonzalez-Granillo, Marcela
    Fellander-Tsai, Li
    von Holst, Hans
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Ergonomics.
    Haldosen, Lars-Arne
    Malkoch, Michael
    Linear Dendritic Block Copolymers as Promising Biomaterials for the Manufacturing of Soft Tissue Adhesive Patches Using Visible Light Initiated Thiol-Ene Coupling Chemistry2015In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 42, p. 6596-6605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A library of dendritic-linear-dendritic (DLD) materials comprising linear poly(ethylene glycol) and hyperbranched dendritic blocks based on 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid is successfully synthesized and post-functionalized with peripheral allyl groups. Reactive DLDs with pseudo-generations of 3 to 6 (G3-G6) are isolated in large scale allowing their thorough evaluation as important components for the development of biomedical adhesives. Due to their branched nature and inherent degradable ester-bonds, promising biomaterial resins are accomplished with suitable viscosity, eliminating the excessive use of co-solvents. By utilizing benign high-energy visible light initiated thiol-ene coupling chemistry, DLDs together with tris[2-(3-mercaptopropionyloxy) ethyl] isocyanurate and surgical mesh enable the fabrication of soft tissue adhesive patches (STAPs) within a total irradiation time of 30 s. The STAPs display the ability to create good adhesion to wet soft tissue and encouraging results in cytotoxicity tests. All crosslinked materials are also found to degrade after being stored in human blood plasma and phosphate buffered saline. The proposed benign methodology coupled with the promising features of the crosslinked materials is herein envisioned as a soft tissue adhesive with properties that do not exist in currently available tissue adhesives.

  • 13.
    Granskog, Viktor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    García-Gallego, Sandra
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    von Kieseritzky, Johanna
    Department of Clinical Science and Education and the Department of Hand Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Rosendahl, Jennifer
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Stenlund, Patrik
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Zhang, Yuning
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Petronis, Sarunas
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Lyvén, Benny
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Arner, Marianne
    Department of Clinical Science and Education and the Department of Hand Surgery, Karolinska Institutet.
    Håkansson, Joakim
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Bioscience and Materials–Medical Device Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    High-Performance Thiol–Ene Composites Unveil a New Era of Adhesives Suited for Bone Repair2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 26, article id 1800372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of adhesives for fracture fixation can revolutionize the surgical procedures toward more personalized bone repairs. However, there are still no commercially available adhesive solutions mainly due to the lack of biocompatibility, poor adhesive strength, or inadequate fixation protocols. Here, a surgically realizable adhesive system capitalizing on visible light thiol–ene coupling chemistry is presented. The adhesives are carefully designed and formulated from a novel class of chemical constituents influenced by dental resin composites and self-etch primers. Validation of the adhesive strengthis conducted on wet bone substrates and accomplished via fiber-reinforced adhesive patch (FRAP) methodology. The results unravel, for the first time, on the promise of a thiol–ene adhesive with an unprecedented shear bondstrength of 9.0 MPa and that surpasses, by 55%, the commercially available acrylate dental adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond of 5.8 MPa. Preclinical validation of FRAPs on rat femur fracture models details good adhesion to the bone throughout the healing process, and are found biocompatible not giving rise to any inflammatory response. Remarkably, the FRAPs are found to withstand loads up to 70 N for 1000 cycles on porcine metacarpal fractures outperforming clinically used K-wires and match metal plates and screw implants.

  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Linnea
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Panagiotis Tasiopoulos, Christos
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Kvick, Mathias
    Spiber technologies AB.
    Duursma, Thijs
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Gasser, T. Christian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Vehicle Engineering and Solid Mechanics, Solid Mechanics.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Micro and Nanosystems.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Recombinant Spider Silk Forms Tough and Elastic Nanomembranes that are Protein‐Permeable and Support Cell Attachment and Growth2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 40, p. 2002982-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologically compatible membranes are of high interest for several biological and medical applications. Tissue engineering, for example, would greatly benefit from ultrathin, yet easy‐to‐handle, biodegradable membranes that are permeable to proteins and support cell growth. In this work, nanomembranes are formed by self‐assembly of a recombinant spider silk protein into a nanofibrillar network at the interface of a standing aqueous solution. The membranes are cm‐sized, free‐standing, bioactive and as thin as 250 nm. Despite their nanoscale thickness, the membranes feature an ultimate engineering strain of over 220% and a toughness of 5.2 MPa. Moreover, they are permeable to human blood plasma proteins and promote cell adherence and proliferation. Human keratinocytes seeded on either side of the membrane form a confluent monolayer within three days. The significance of these results lays in the unique combination of nanoscale thickness, elasticity, toughness, biodegradability, protein permeability and support for cell growth, as this may enable new applications in tissue engineering including bi‐layered in vitro tissue models and support for clinical transplantation of coherent cell layers.

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  • 15. He, Yuhui
    et al.
    Scheicher, Ralph H.
    Grigoriev, Anton
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Long, Shibing
    Huo, ZongLiang
    Liu, Ming
    Enhanced DNA Sequencing Performance Through Edge-Hydrogenation of Graphene Electrodes2011In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 21, no 14, p. 2674-2679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of graphene electrodes with hydrogenated edges for solid-state nanopore-based DNA sequencing is proposed, and molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with electronic transport calculations are performed to explore the potential merits of this idea. The results of the investigation show that, compared to the unhydrogenated system, edge-hydrogenated graphene electrodes facilitate the temporary formation of H-bonds with suitable atomic sites in the translocating DNA molecule. As a consequence, the average conductivity is drastically raised by about 3 orders of magnitude while exhibiting significantly reduced statistical variance. Furthermore, the effect of the distance between opposing electrodes is investigated and two regimes identified: for narrow electrode separation, the mere hindrance due to the presence of protruding hydrogen atoms in the nanopore is deemed more important, while for wider electrode separation, the formation of H-bonds becomes the dominant effect. Based on these findings, it is concluded that hydrogenation of graphene electrode edges represents a promising approach to reduce the translocation speed of DNA through the nanopore and substantially improve the accuracy of the measurement process for whole-genome sequencing.

  • 16. Heger, J. E.
    et al.
    Chen, W.
    Yin, S.
    Li, N.
    Körstgens, V.
    Brett, Calvin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Ohm, W.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    Low-Temperature and Water-Based Biotemplating of Nanostructured Foam-Like Titania Films Using ß-Lactoglobulin2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 20, article id 2113080Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the broad use of nanostructured crystalline titania films, an environmentally friendly and more sustainable synthesis route is highly desirable. Here, a water-based, low-temperature route is presented to synthesize nanostructured foam-like crystalline titania films. A pearl necklace-like nanostructure is introduced as tailored titania morphology via biotemplating with the use of the major bovine whey protein ß-lactoglobulin (ß-lg). It is shown that titania crystallization in a brookite-anatase mixed phase is promoted via spray deposition at a comparatively low temperature of 120 °C. The obtained crystallites have an average grain size of (4.2 ± 0.3) nm. In situ grazing incidence small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS) are simultaneously performed to understand the kinetics of film formation and the templating role of ß-lg during spray coating. In the ß-lg:titania biohybrid composites, the crystal growth in semicrystalline titania clusters is sterically directed by the condensing ß-lg biomatrix. Due to using spray coating, the green chemistry approach to titania-based functional films can be scaled up on a large scale, which can potentially be used in photocatalytic processes or systems related to energy application. 

  • 17.
    Horak, Josef
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Dev, Apurba
    Uppsala Univ, Ångström Lab, Solid State Elect, Uppsala Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nilebäck, Linnea
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Behnam, Kiarash
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Linnros, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Photonics.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Eriksson Karlström, Amelie
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Engineering.
    Recombinant Spider Silk as Mediator for One-Step, Chemical-Free Surface Biofunctionalization2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 21, article id 1800206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A unique strategy for effective, versatile, and facile surface biofunctionalization employing a recombinant spider silk protein genetically functionalized with the antibody-binding Z domain (Z-4RepCT) is reported. It is demonstrated that Z-silk can be applied to a variety of materials and platform designs as a truly one-step and chemical-free surface modification that site specifically captures antibodies while simultaneously reducing nonspecific adsorption. As a model surface, SiO2 is used to optimize and characterize Z-silk performance compared to the Z domain immobilized by a standard silanization method. First, Z-silk adsorption is investigated and verified its biofunctionality in a long-term stability experiment. To assess the binding capacity and protein-protein interaction stability of Z-silk, the coating is used to capture human antibodies in various assay formats. An eightfold higher binding capacity and 40-fold lower detection limit are obtained in the immunofluorescence assay, and the complex stability of captured antibodies is shown to be improved by a factor of 20. Applicability of Z-silk to functionalize microfluidic devices is demonstrated by antibody detection in an electrokinetic microcapillary biosensor. To test Z-silk for biomarker applications, real-time detection and quantification of human immunoglobulin G are performed in a plasma sample and C1q capture from human serum using an anti-C1q antibody.

  • 18.
    Hou, Jungang
    et al.
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Yiqing
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Li, Zhuwei
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Bo
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Cao, Shuyan
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Yunzhen
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Gao, Zhanming
    DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. DUT, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China.
    Electrical Behavior and Electron Transfer Modulation of Nickel-Copper Nanoalloys Confined in Nickel-Copper Nitrides Nanowires Array Encapsulated in Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Framework as Robust Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Overall Water Splitting2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 37, article id 1803278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Probing robust electrocatalysts for overall water splitting is vital in energy conversion. However, the catalytic efficiency of reported catalysts is still limited by few active sites, low conductivity, and/or discrete electron transport. Herein, bimetallic nickel-copper (NiCu) nanoalloys confined in mesoporous nickel-copper nitride (NiCuN) nanowires array encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) framework (NC-NiCu-NiCuN) is constructed by carbonization-/nitridation-induced in situ growth strategies. The in situ coupling of NiCu nanoalloys, NiCuN, and carbon layers through dual modulation of electrical behavior and electron transfer is not only beneficial to continuous electron transfer throughout the whole system, but also promotes the enhancement of electrical conductivity and the accessibility of active sites. Owing to strong synergetic coupling effect, such NC-NiCu-NiCuN electrocatalyst exhibits the best hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performance with a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at low overpotentials of 93 mV for HER and 232 mV for OER, respectively. As expected, a two-electrode cell using NC-NiCu-NiCuN is constructed to deliver 10 mA cm(-2) water-splitting current at low cell voltage of 1.56 V with remarkable durability over 50 h. This work serves as a promising platform to explore the design and synthesis of robust bifunctional electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  • 19. Hou, Jungang
    et al.
    Sun, Yiqing
    Wu, Yunzhen
    Cao, Shuyan
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Promoting Active Sites in Core-Shell Nanowire Array as Mott-Schottky Electrocatalysts for Efficient and Stable Overall Water Splitting2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 4, article id 1704447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing earth-abundant, active, and robust electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) remains a vital challenge for efficient conversion of sustainable energy sources. Herein, metal-semiconductor hybrids are reported with metallic nanoalloys on various defective oxide nanowire arrays (Cu/CuOx, Co/CoOx, and CuCo/CuCoOx) as typical Mott-Schottky electrocatalysts. To build the highway of continuous electron transport between metals and semiconductors, nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) has been implanted on metal-semiconductor nanowire array as core-shell conductive architecture. As expected, NC/CuCo/CuCoOx nanowires arrays, as integrated Mott-Schottky electrocatalysts, present an overpotential of 112 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) and a low Tafel slope of 55 mV dec(-1) for HER, simultaneously delivering an overpotential of 190 mV at 10 mA cm(-2) for OER. Most importantly, NC/CuCo/CuCoOx architectures, as both the anode and the cathode for overall water splitting, exhibit a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a cell voltage of 1.53 V with excellent stability due to high conductivity, large active surface area, abundant active sites, and the continuous electron transport from prominent synergetic effect among metal, semiconductor, and nitrogen-doped carbon. This work represents an avenue to design and develop efficient and stable Mott-Schottky bifunctional electrocatalysts for promising energy conversion.

  • 20.
    Hou, Jungang
    et al.
    Dalian Univ Technol, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Wu, Yunzhen
    Dalian Univ Technol, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Bo
    Dalian Univ Technol, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Cao, Shuyan
    Dalian Univ Technol, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Li, Zhuwei
    Dalian Univ Technol, Inst Energy Sci & Technol, DUT KTH Joint Educ & Res Ctr Mol Devices, State Key Lab Fine Chem, Dalian 116024, Peoples R China..
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, DUT-KTH Joint Education and Research Center on Molecular Devices, Institute of Energy Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian, 116024, China.
    Rational Design of Nanoarray Architectures for Electrocatalytic Water Splitting2019In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 29, no 20, article id 1808367Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical water splitting is recognized as a practical strategy for impelling the transformation of sustainable energy sources such as solar energy from electricity to clean hydrogen fuel. To actualize the large-scale hydrogen production, it is paramount to develop low-cost, earth-abundant, efficient, and stable electrocatalysts. Among those electrocatalysts, alternative architectural arrays grown on conductive substrates have been proven to be highly efficient toward water splitting due to large surface area, abundant active sites, and synergistic effects between the electrocatalysts and the substrates. Herein, the advancement of nanoarray architectures in electrocatalytic applications is reviewed. The categories of different nanoarrays and the reliable and versatile synthetic approaches of electrocatalysts are summarized. A unique emphasis is highlighted on the promising strategies to enhance the electrocatalytic activities and stability of architectural arrays by component manipulation, heterostructure regulation, and vacancy engineering. The intrinsic mechanism analysis of electronic structure optimization, intermediates' adsorption facilitation, and coordination environments' amelioration is also discussed with regard to theoretical simulation and in situ identification. Finally, the challenges and opportunities on the valuable directions and promising pathways of architectural arrays toward outstanding electrocatalytic performance are provided in the energy conversion field, facilitating the development of promising water splitting systems.

  • 21.
    Hu, Xiangzhao
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
    Liu, Yingnan
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
    Cui, Wenjun
    Research and Testing Centre of Material School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430070, China.
    Yang, Xiaoxuan
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
    Li, Jiantong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Zheng, Sixing
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
    Yang, Bin
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China; Institute of Zhejiang University – Quzhou, Quzhou, 324000, China.
    Li, Zhongjian
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China; Institute of Zhejiang University – Quzhou, Quzhou, 324000, China.
    Sang, Xiahan
    Research and Testing Centre of Material School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430070, China.
    Xu, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lei, Lecheng
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China; Institute of Zhejiang University – Quzhou, Quzhou, 324000, China.
    Hou, Yang
    Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China; Institute of Zhejiang University – Quzhou, Quzhou, 324000, China; School of Biological and Chemical Engineering, NingboTech University, 1 South Qianhu Road, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315100, China, 1 South Qianhu Road, Zhejiang; Donghai Laboratory, No.1 Zheda Road, Zhoushan, Zhejiang, 316021, China, No.1 Zheda Road, Zhejiang.
    Boosting Industrial-Level CO2 Electroreduction of N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers with Confined Tin-Nitrogen Active Sites via Accelerating Proton Transport Kinetics2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 4, article id 2208781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of highly efficient robust electrocatalysts with low overpotential and industrial-level current density is of great significance for CO2 electroreduction (CO2ER), however the low proton transport rate during the CO2ER remains a challenge. Herein, a porous N-doped carbon nanofiber confined with tin-nitrogen sites (Sn/NCNFs) catalyst is developed, which is prepared through an integrated electrospinning and pyrolysis strategy. The optimized Sn/NCNFs catalyst exhibits an outstanding CO2ER activity with the maximum CO FE of 96.5%, low onset potential of −0.3 V, and small Tafel slope of 68.8 mV dec−1. In a flow cell, an industrial-level CO partial current density of 100.6 mA cm−2 is achieved. In situ spectroscopic analysis unveil the isolated Sn-N site acted as active center for accelerating water dissociation and subsequent proton transport process, thus promoting the formation of intermediate *COOH in the rate-determining step for CO2ER. Theoretical calculations validate pyrrolic N atom adjacent to the Sn-N active species assisted reducing the energy barrier for *COOH formation, thus boosting the CO2ER kinetics. A Zn-CO2 battery is designed with the cathode of Sn/NCNFs, which delivers a maximum power density of 1.38 mW cm−2 and long-term stability.

  • 22.
    Huang, Shiyu
    et al.
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Frontiers Science Center for Smart Materials Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Chang, Yuan
    Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Li, Zhuwei
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Frontiers Science Center for Smart Materials Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Cao, Jiaqi
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Frontiers Science Center for Smart Materials Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Song, Yurou
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Frontiers Science Center for Smart Materials Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Gao, Junfeng
    Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry. Center of Artificial Photosynthesis for Solar Fuels and Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Westlake University, Hangzhou, 310024, P. R. China.
    Hou, Jungang
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Frontiers Science Center for Smart Materials Oriented Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P. R. China.
    Single-Atom Metal Sites Anchored Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks for Superior “Two-In-One” Photocatalytic Reaction2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 21, article id 2211631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoredox catalysis is a green solution for organics transformation and CO2 conversion into valuable fuels, meeting the challenges of sustainable energy and environmental concerns. However, the regulation of single-atomic active sites in organic framework not only influences the photoredox performance, but also limits the understanding of the relationship for photocatalytic selective organic conversion with CO2 valorization into one reaction system. As a prototype, different single-atomic metal (M) sites (M2+ = Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+) in hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (M-HOF) backbone with bridging structure of metal-nitrogen are constructed by a typical “two-in-one” strategy for superior photocatalytic C-N coupling reactions integrated with CO2 valorization. Remarkably, Zn-HOF achieves 100% conversion of benzylamine oxidative coupling reactions, 91% selectivity of N-benzylidenebenzylamine and CO2 conversion in one photoredox cycle. From X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and density functional theory calculations, the superior photocatalytic performance is attributed to synergic effect of atomically dispersed metal sites and HOF host, decreasing the reaction energy barriers, enhancing CO2 adsorption and forming benzylcarbamic acid intermediate to promote the redox recycle. This work not only affords the rational design strategy of single-atom active sites in functional HOF, but also facilitates the fundamental insights upon the mechanism of versatile photoredox coupling reaction systems.

  • 23.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    et al.
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Courtin, Christophe M.
    Sandgren, Mats
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Rational Design of Spider Silk Materials Genetically Fused with an Enzyme2015In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 33, p. 5343-5352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzyme immobilization is an attractive route for achieving catalytically functional surfaces suitable for both continuous and repeated use. Herein, genetic engineering is used to combine the catalytic ability of a xylanase with the self-assembly properties of recombinant spider silk, realizing silk materials with enzymatic activity. Under near-physiological conditions, soluble xylanase-silk fusion proteins assembled into fibers displaying catalytic activity. Also, a xylanase-silk protein variant with the silk part miniaturized to contain only the C-terminal domain of the silk protein formed fibers with catalytic activity. The repertoire of xylanase-silk formats is further extended to include 2D surface coatings and 3D foams, also being catalytically active, showing the versatile range of possible silk materials. The stability of the xylanase-silk materials is explored, demonstrating the possibility of storage, reuse, and cleaning with ethanol. Interestingly, fibers can also be stored dried with substantial residual activity after rehydration. Moreover, a continuous enzymatic reaction using xylanase-silk is demonstrated, making enzymatic batch reactions not the sole possible implementation. The proof-of-concept for recombinantly produced enzyme-silk, herein shown with a xylanase, implies that also other enzymes can be used in similar setups. It is envisioned that the concept of enzyme-silk can find its applicability in, for example, multienzyme reaction systems or biosensors.

  • 24.
    Jiang, K.
    et al.
    The Soft2D Lab, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Thermal Ageing, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China.
    Baburin, I. A.
    Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden & Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany.
    Han, P.
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Yang, C.
    The Soft2D Lab, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Thermal Ageing, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China.
    Fu, X.
    Physics Department & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Road 3663, Shanghai, 200062 China.
    Yao, Y.
    Physics Department & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, East China Normal University, North Zhongshan Road 3663, Shanghai, 200062 China.
    Li, Jiantong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Cánovas, E.
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Seifert, G.
    Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden & Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany.
    Chen, J.
    The Soft2D Lab, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Thermal Ageing, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China.
    Bonn, M.
    Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Feng, X.
    Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden & Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany.
    Zhuang, X.
    The Soft2D Lab, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Thermal Ageing, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 China.
    Interfacial Approach toward Benzene-Bridged Polypyrrole Film–Based Micro-Supercapacitors with Ultrahigh Volumetric Power Density2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 7, article id 1908243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2D soft nanomaterials are an emerging research field due to their versatile chemical structures, easily tunable properties, and broad application potential. In this study, a benzene‐bridged polypyrrole film with a large area, up to a few square centimeters, is synthesized through an interfacial polymerization approach. As‐prepared semiconductive films exhibit a bandgap of ≈2 eV and a carrier mobility of ≈1.5 cm2 V−1 s−1, inferred from time‐resolved terahertz spectroscopy. The samples are employed to fabricate in‐plane micro‐supercapacitors (MSCs) by laser scribing and exhibit an ultrahigh areal capacitance of 0.95 mF cm−2, using 1‐ethyl‐3‐methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([EMIM][BF4]) as an electrolyte. Importantly, the maximum energy and power densities of the developed MSCs reach values up to 50.7 mWh cm−3 and 9.6 kW cm−3, respectively; the performance surpassing most of the 2D material‐based MSCs is reported to date.

  • 25.
    Jiang, Kun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77 Sweden.
    Yan, Hongji
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77 Sweden.
    Rickert, C.
    Marczynski, M.
    Sixtensson, Kajsa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Lieleg, O.
    Crouzier, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. AIMES – Center for the Advancement of Integrated Medical and Engineering Sciences at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, SE-171 77 Sweden.
    Modulating the Bioactivity of Mucin Hydrogels with Crosslinking Architecture2021In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 31, no 10, article id 2008428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogels made of crosslinked macromolecules used in regenerative medicine technologies can be designed to affect the fate of surrounding cells and tissues in defined ways. Their function typically depends on the type and number of bioactive moieties such as receptor ligands present in the hydrogel. However, the detail in how such moieties are presented to cells can also be instrumental. In this work, how the crosslinking architecture of a hydrogel can affect its bioactivity is explored. It is shown that bovine submaxillary mucins, a highly glycosylated and immune-modulating protein, exhibit strikingly different bioactivities whether they are crosslinked through their glycans or their protein domains. Both the susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and macrophage response are affected, while rheological properties and barrier to diffusion are mostly unaffected. The results suggest that crosslinking architecture affects the accessibility of the substrate to proteases and the pattern of sialic acid residues exposed to the macrophages. Thus, modulating the accessibility of binding sites through the choice of the crosslinking strategy appears as a useful parameter to tune the bioactivity of hydrogel-based systems. 

  • 26.
    Jiang, Xiao
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Karlsson, Karl Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Gabrielsson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Erik M. J.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Quintana, Maria
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Karlsson, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE). Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University, Box 259, SE-751 05 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Highly Efficient Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Triphenylamine Dyes2011In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 21, no 15, p. 2944-2952Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two triphenylamine-based metal-free organic sensitizers, D35 with a single anchor group and M14 with two anchor groups, have been applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) with a solid hole transporting material or liquid iodide/triiodide based electrolyte. Using the molecular hole conductor 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine)9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD), good overall conversion efficiencies of 4.5% for D35 and 4.4% for M14 were obtained under standard AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW cm(-2)). Although M14 has a higher molar extinction coefficient (by similar to 60%) and a slightly broader absorption spectrum compared to D35, the latter performs slightly better due to longer lifetime of electrons in the TiO(2), which can be attributed to differences in the molecular structure. In iodide/triiodide electrolyte-based DSCs, D35 outperforms M14 to a much greater extent, due to a very large increase in electron lifetime. This can be explained by both the greater blocking capability of the D35 monolayer and the smaller degree of interaction of triiodide (iodine) with D35 compared to M14. The present work gives some insight into how the molecular structure of sensitizer affects the performance in solid-state and iodide/triiodide-based DSCs.

  • 27.
    Jiang, Xue
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Zhao, J.
    Li, Y. -L
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Material Physics.
    Tunable assembly of sp3 cross-linked 3D graphene monoliths: A first-principles prediction2013In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 23, no 47, p. 5846-5853Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the biggest challenges in graphene applications is how one can fabricate 3D architectures comprising graphene sheets in which the resulting architectures have inherited graphene's excellent intrinsic properties but have overcome its shortcomings. Two series of 3D graphene monoliths (GMs) using zigzag or armchair graphene nanoribbons as building blocks and sp3 carbon chains as junction nodes are constructued, and calculations based on first principles are performed in order to predict their mechanical and electronic properties. The perfect match between sp2 nanoribbons and sp3 linkers results in favorable energy and mechanical/dynamic stability. Owing to their tailored motifs, wine-rack-like pores, and rigid sp3 linkers, these GMs possess high surface areas, appreciable mechanical strength, and tunable band gaps. Negative linear compressibilities in a wide range are found for the zigzag GMs. By solving the problems of zero gap and dimensionality of graphene sheets simultaneously, these GMs offer a viable strategy towards many applications, e.g., microelectronic devices, energy storage, molecular sieves, sensitive pressure detectors, and telecommunication line systems.

  • 28.
    Kaya, Kerem
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    Kravberg, Alexander
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    Scarpellini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    Iseri, Emre
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    Kragic, Danica
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Robotics, Perception and Learning, RPL. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems. Digital Futures, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, 114 28 Sweden.
    Programmable Matter with Free and High-Resolution Transfiguration and Locomotion2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Hot flow in the cold

    changes shape in a dead world

    comes matter to life”

    Programmable matter that allows free shape transfiguration and locomotionon command promises ubiquitous access to objects or functions of interest.Current approaches for the autonomous reshaping of solid objects (smartmaterials, soft actuators, modular robotics) are limited in spatial resolution andshape. Solid-liquid phase change pumping as a mechanism for the contactlesstransfiguring and locomotion of solid objects is introduced. Thin objects aredeformed into any intended shape with sub-millimeter resolution and the abilityto freely change their topology is demonstrated, including adding or removingholes, splitting and merging. The unique locomotion of objects throughmillimeter-sized constrictions narrower than their body size is demonstrated,followed by restoring the original shape. This approach opens up avenues fordeveloping autonomous programmable matter with free shape transfiguration.

  • 29.
    Kluge, Regina M.
    et al.
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Saxena, Nitin
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Chen, Wei
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Koerstgens, Volker
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Zhong, Qi
    Zhejiang Sci Tech Univ, Key Lab Adv Text Mat & Mfg Technol, Minist Educ, Hangzhou 310018, Peoples R China..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, Lehrstuhl Funkt Mat, Phys Dept, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Heinz Maier Leibnitz Zentrum, Lichtenbergstr 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Doping Dependent In-Plane and Cross-Plane Thermoelectric Performance of Thin n-Type Polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) Films2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 28, article id 2003092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermoelectric generators pose a promising approach in renewable energies as they can convert waste heat into electricity. In order to build high efficiency devices, suitable thermoelectric materials, both n- and p-type, are needed. Here, the n-type high-mobility polymer poly[N,N '-bis(2-octyldodecyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5 '-(2,2 '-bithiophene) (P(NDI2OD-T2)) is focused upon. Via solution doping with 4-(1,3-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzoimidazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline (N-DPBI), a maximum power factor of (1.84 +/- 0.13) mu W K-2 m(-1) is achieved in an in-plane geometry for 5 wt% dopant concentration. Additionally, UV-vis spectroscopy and grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering are applied to elucidate the mechanisms of the doping process and to explain the discrepancy in thermoelectric performance depending on the charge carriers being either transported in-plane or cross-plane. Morphological changes are found such that the crystallites, built-up by extended polymer chains interacting via lamellar and pi-pi stacking, re-arrange from face- to edge-on orientation upon doping. At high doping concentrations, dopant molecules disturb the crystallinity of the polymer, hindering charge transport and leading to a decreased power factor at high dopant concentrations. These observations explain why an intermediate doping concentration of N-DPBI leads to an optimized thermoelectric performance of P(NDI2OD-T2) in an in-plane geometry as compared to the cross-plane case.

  • 30.
    Li, Jiantong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Naiini, Maziar M.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Vaziri, Sam
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Lemme, Max C.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits. University of Siegen, Germany.
    Östling, Mikael
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
    Inkjet Printing of MoS22014In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 24, no 41, p. 6524-6531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and efficient inkjet printing technology is developed for molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), one of the most attractive two-dimensional layered materials. The technology effectively addresses critical issues associated with normal MoS2 liquid dispersions (such as incompatible rheology, low concentration, and solvent toxicity), and hence can directly and reliably write uniform patterns of high-quality (5-7 nm thick) MoS2 nanosheets at a resolution of tens of micrometers. The technology efficiency facilitates the integration of printed MoS2 patterns with other components (such as electrodes), and hence allows fabricating various functional devices, including thin film transistors, photoluminescence patterns, and photodetectors, in a simple, massive and cost-effective manner while retains the unique properties of MoS2. The technology has great potential in a variety of applications, such as photonics, optoelectronics, sensors, and energy storage.

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  • 31. Li, N.
    et al.
    Guo, R.
    Chen, W.
    Körstgens, V.
    Heger, J. E.
    Liang, S.
    Brett, Calvin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, Hamburg, 22603, Germany.
    Hossain, M. A.
    Zheng, J.
    Deimel, P. S.
    Buyruk, A.
    Allegretti, F.
    Schwartzkopf, M.
    Veinot, J. G. C.
    Schmitz, G.
    Barth, J. V.
    Ameri, T.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Müller-Buschbaum, P.
    Tailoring Ordered Mesoporous Titania Films via Introducing Germanium Nanocrystals for Enhanced Electron Transfer Photoanodes for Photovoltaic Applications2021In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 31, no 34, article id 2102105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a diblock-copolymer templated sol–gel synthesis, germanium nanocrystals (GeNCs) are introduced to tailor mesoporous titania (TiO2) films for obtaining more efficient anodes for photovoltaic applications. After thermal annealing in air, the hybrid films with different GeNC content are investigated and compared with films undergoing an argon atmosphere annealing. The surface and inner morphologies of the TiO2/GeOx nanocomposite films are probed via scanning electron microscopy and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal phase, chemical composition, and optical properties of the nanocomposite films are examined with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. Special focus is set on the air-annealed nanocomposite films since they hold greater promise for photovoltaics. Specifically, the charge–carrier dynamics of these air-annealed nanocomposite films are studied, and it is found that, compared with pristine TiO2 photoanodes, the GeNC addition enhances the electron transfer, yielding an increase in the short-circuit photocurrent density of exemplary perovskite solar cells and thus, an enhanced device efficiency as well as a significantly reduced hysteresis. 

  • 32.
    Li, Shanghua
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Furberg, Richard
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Toprak, Muhammet S.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Palm, Björn E.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration.
    Muhammed, Mamoun
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Functional Materials, FNM.
    Nature-inspired boiling enhancement by novel nanostructured macroporous surfaces2008In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 18, no 15, p. 2215-2220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    World energy crisis has triggered more attention to energy saving and energy conversion systems. Enhanced surfaces for boiling are among the applications of great interest since they can improve the energy efficiency of heat pumping equipment (i.e., air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigeration machines). Methods that are used to make the state-of-the-art enhanced Surfaces are often based on complicated mechanical machine tools, are quite material-consuming and give limited enhancement of the boiling heat transfer. Here, we present a new approach to fabricate enhanced surfaces by using a simple electrodeposition method with in-situ grown dynamic gas bubble templates. As a result, a well-ordered 3D macro-porous metallic surface layer with nanostructured porosity is obtained. Since the structure is built based on the dynamic bubbles, it is perfect for the bubble generation applications Such as nucleate boiling. At heat flux of 1W cm(-2), the heat transfer coefficient is enhanced over 17 times compared to a plain reference Surface. It's estimated that such ail effective boiling surface Would improve the energy efficiency of many heat Pumping machines with 10-30%. The extraordinary boiling performance is explained based on the structure characteristics.

  • 33.
    Li, Zheng
    et al.
    KTH.
    Ruiz, Virginia
    CIDETEC, Basque Research and Technology Alliance (BRTA), Paseo Miramón 196, Donostia-San Sebastián, E-20014, Spain.
    Mishukova, Viktoriia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Wan, Qiansu
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Liu, Haomin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Xue, Han
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Electronic and embedded systems.
    Gao, Ying
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cao, Gaolong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Zhuang, Xiaodong
    The Soft2D Lab, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Thermal Ageing, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Materials and Nanophysics.
    Cheng, Shi
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems, Integrated devices and circuits.
    Li, Jiantong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Inkjet Printed Disposable High-Rate On-Paper Microsupercapacitors2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 2108773-, article id 2108773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On-paper microsupercapacitors (MSCs) are a key energy storage component for disposable electronics that are anticipated to essentially address the increasing global concern of electronic waste. However, nearly none of the present on-paper MSCs combine eco-friendliness with high electrochemical performance (especially the rate capacity). In this work, highly reliable conductive inks based on the ternary composite of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), graphene quantum dots and graphene are developed for scalable inkjet printing of compact (footprint area ≈ 20 mm2) disposable MSCs on commercial paper substrates. Without any post treatment, the printed patterns attain a sheet resistance as low as 4 Ω ▫−1. The metal-free all-solid-state MSCs exhibit a maximum areal capacitance > 2 mF cm−2 at a high scan rate of 1000 mV s−1, long cycle life (>95% capacitance retention after 10 000 cycles), excellent flexibility, and long service time. Remarkably, the “totally metal-free” MSC arrays are fully inkjet printed on paper substrates and also exhibit high rate performance. The life cycle assessment indicates that these printed devices have much lower eco-toxicity and global warming potential than other on-paper MSCs.

  • 34. Lim, C. -K
    et al.
    Maldonado, M.
    Zalesny, R.
    Valiev, R.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Gomes, A. S. L.
    Jiang, J.
    Pachter, R.
    Prasad, P. N.
    Interlayer-Sensitized Linear and Nonlinear Photoluminescence of Quasi-2D Hybrid Perovskites Using Aggregation-Induced Enhanced Emission Active Organic Cation Layers2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 16, article id 1909375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A concept of interlayer-sensitized photoluminescence (PL) of quasi-2D hybrid perovskite (PVK) with a π-conjugated optically interacting organic cation layer is introduced and demonstrated. A rod-shaped aggregation-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) organic cation (BPCSA+), well fitted into the lattice size of 2D PVK layers, is designed and synthesized to prolong the exciton lifetime in a condensed layer assembly in the PVK. The BPCSA+ promotes the PL of this hybrid PVK up to 10-folds from that of a non-π-conjugated organic cation (OA) 2D PVK. Notably, different from PL of OA 2D PVK, the increased PL intensity of BPCSA 2D PVKs with an increase of the BPCSA ratio in the PVK indicates a critical photon-harvesting contribution of BPCSA. The films of BPCSA 2D PVKs are incredibly stable in ambient environments for more than 4 months and even upon direct contact with water. Additionally, due to the strong two-photon absorption property of BPCSA, the BPCSA 2D PVK displays superior emission properties upon two-photon excitation with a short wavelength IR laser. Thus, the AIEE sensitization system for quasi-2D PVK hybrid system can make a drastic improvement in performance as well as in the stability of the PVK emitter and PVK based nonlinear optical devices.

  • 35. Ling, L.
    et al.
    Yuan, S.
    Wang, P.
    Zhang, H.
    Tu, L.
    Wang, J.
    Zhan, Y.
    Zheng, Lirong
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Solar Cells: Precisely Controlled Hydration Water for Performance Improvement of Organic–Inorganic Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Funct. Mater. 28/2016)2016In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 26, no 28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Ling, Li
    et al.
    Yuan, Sijian
    Wang, Pengfei
    Zhang, Huotian
    Tu, Li
    Wang, Jiao
    Zhan, Yiqiang
    Zheng, Lirong
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK. Fudan Univ, Peoples R China.
    Precisely Controlled Hydration Water for Performance Improvement of Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Solar Cells2016In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 26, no 28, p. 5028-5034Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, intensive studies on the role of water molecule in the formation of organic-inorganic perovskite film have been reported. However, not only the contradictive phenomena but also the complex processing technique has hindered the widespread use of water molecule in perovskite preparation. Here the hydration water is introduced into the precursors instead of water. By precisely controlling the content of hydration water, a smoother and more uniform perovskite film is obtained through a simple one-step spin coating method. The improvement of perovskite film quality leads to highly efficient planar perovskite solar cells. Summing up the device studies and the investigation of morphology, crystallization, and optical properties, the impact of water molecule in the formation of perovskite crystal and consequences of device performance is understood. Due to its universal adaptability and simplified process, precise control of hydration water is therefore of great utility to high quality perovskite films fabrication and large-scale production of this upcoming photovoltaic technology.

  • 37.
    Liu, Claire
    et al.
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Kim, Jin Tae
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Yang, Da Som
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Cho, Donghwi
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34114, Republic of Korea, Yuseong-gu.
    Yoo, Seonggwang
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Madhvapathy, Surabhi R.
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Jeong, Hyoyoung
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.
    Yang, Tianyu
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Luan, Haiwen
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Avila, Raudel
    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Park, Jihun
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Wu, Yunyun
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Bryant, Kennedy
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Cho, Min
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.
    Lee, Ji Yong
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
    Kwak, Jay Young
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Ryu, Won Hyoung
    School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea.
    Huang, Yonggang
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA.
    Nuzzo, Ralph G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.
    Rogers, John A.
    Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, 60208, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.
    Multifunctional Materials Strategies for Enhanced Safety of Wireless, Skin-Interfaced Bioelectronic Devices2023In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 33, no 34, article id 2302256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many recently developed classes of wireless, skin-interfaced bioelectronic devices rely on conventional thermoset silicone elastomer materials, such as poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), as soft encapsulating structures around collections of electronic components, radio frequency antennas and, commonly, rechargeable batteries. In optimized layouts and device designs, these materials provide attractive features, most prominently in their gentle, noninvasive interfaces to the skin even at regions of high curvature and large natural deformations. Past studies, however, overlook opportunities for developing variants of these materials for multimodal means to enhance the safety of the devices against failure modes that range from mechanical damage to thermal runaway. This study presents a self-healing PDMS dynamic covalent matrix embedded with chemistries that provide thermochromism, mechanochromism, strain-adaptive stiffening, and thermal insulation, as a collection of attributes relevant to safety. Demonstrations of this materials system and associated encapsulation strategy involve a wireless, skin-interfaced device that captures mechanoacoustic signatures of health status. The concepts introduced here can apply immediately to many other related bioelectronic devices.

  • 38.
    Liu, Yingxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Shu-Hong
    Univ Sci & Technol China, CAS Ctr Excellence Nanosci, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Suzhou Nano Sci & Technol, Div Nanomat & Chem,Hefei Natl Lab Phys Sci, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China..
    Bergström, Lennart
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Stockholm Univ, Dept Mat & Environm Chem, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Transparent and Flexible Nacre-Like Hybrid Films of Aminoclays and Carboxylated Cellulose Nanofibrils2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 27, article id 1703277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nacre and other biological composites are important inspirations for the design and fabrication of multifunctional composite materials. Transparent, strong, and flexible hybrid films of aminoclays (AC) and carboxylated cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) with a nacre-like microstructure at AC contents up to 60 wt% are prepared. The high transmittance of visible light is attributed to the high homogeneity of the hybrid films and to the relatively small refractive index contrast between the CNF-based matrix and synthetic AC. The strength and strain to failure of the hybrids are significantly higher than biogenic nacre and other nacre-mimicking nanocellulose-based materials, e.g., montmorillonite-CNF and graphene oxide-CNF composite films. The excellent mechanical properties are related to the ionic bonds between the negatively charged carboxylic groups on the CNF and the positively charged amine groups on the AC nanoparticles. This work illustrates the significance of tailoring the interactions between small clay particles and biopolymers in multifunctional materials with potential applications as printable barrier coatings and sub-strates for optoelectronics.

  • 39. MacLachlan, Andrew J
    et al.
    Rath, Thomas
    Cappel, Ute B
    Dowland, Simon A
    Amenitsch, Heinz
    Knall, Astrid-Caroline
    Buchmaier, Christine
    Trimmel, Gregor
    Nelson, Jenny
    Haque, Saif A
    Polymer/Nanocrystal Hybrid Solar Cells: Influence of Molecular Precursor Design on Film Nanomorphology, Charge Generation and Device Performance.2015In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 409-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, molecular tuning of metal xanthate precursors is shown to have a marked effect on the heterojunction morphology of hybrid poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)/CdS blends and, as a result, the photochemical processes and overall performance of in situ fabricated hybrid solar cells. A series of cadmium xanthate complexes is synthesized for use as in situ precursors to cadmium sulfide nanoparticles in hybrid P3HT/CdS solar cells. The formation of CdS domains is studied by simultaneous GIWAXS (grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering) and GISAXS (grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering), revealing knowledge about crystal growth and the formation of different morphologies observed using TEM (transmission electron microscopy). These measurements show that there is a strong relationship between precursor structure and heterojunction nanomorphology. A combination of TAS (transient absorption spectroscopy) and photovoltaic device performance measurements is used to show the intricate balance required between charge photogeneration and percolated domains in order to effectively extract charges to maximize device power conversion efficiencies. This study presents a strong case for xanthate complexes as a useful route to designing optimal heterojunction morphologies for use in the emerging field of hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells, due to the fact that the nanomorphology can be tuned via careful design of these precursor materials.

  • 40.
    McCracken, Joselle M.
    et al.
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, 600 S Matthews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801 USA..
    Rauzan, Brittany M.
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, 600 S Matthews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801 USA..
    Kjellman, Jacob C. E.
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, 600 S Matthews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801 USA..
    Su, Hanxiao
    Univ Illinois, Frederick Seitz Mat Res Lab, 1304 West Green St, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.;Univ Illinois, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, 1304 West Green St, Urbana, IL 61801 USA..
    Rogers, Simon A.
    Univ Illinois, Dept Chem & Biomol Engn, 600 S Matthews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801 USA..
    Nuzzo, Ralph G.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Univ Illinois, Dept Chem, 600 S Matthews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.;Univ Illinois, Frederick Seitz Mat Res Lab, 1304 West Green St, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.;Univ Illinois, Dept Mat Sci & Engn, 1304 West Green St, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Surface & Corros Sci, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Drottning Kristinasvag 51, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ionic Hydrogels with Biomimetic 4D-Printed Mechanical Gradients: Models for Soft-Bodied Aquatic Organisms2019In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 29, no 28, article id 1806723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct-ink writing (DIW), a rapidly growing and advancing form of additive manufacturing, provides capacities for on-demand tailoring of materials to meet specific requirements for final designs. The penultimate challenge faced with the increasing demand of customization is to extend beyond modification of shape to create 4D structures, dynamic 3D structures that can respond to stimuli in the local environment. Patterning material gradients is foundational for assembly of 4D structures, however, there remains a general need for useful materials chemistries to generate gray scale gradients via DIW. Here, presented is a simple materials assembly paradigm using DIW to pattern ionotropic gradients in hydrogels. Using structures that architecturally mimic sea-jelly organisms, the capabilities of spatial patterning are highlighted as exemplified by selectively programming the valency of the ion-binding agents. Spatial gradients, when combined with geometry, allow for programming the flexibility and movement of iron oxide nanoparticle-loaded ionotropic hydrogels to generate 4D-printed structures that actuate in the presence of local magnetic fields. This work highlights approaches to 4D design complexity that exploits 3D-printed gray-scale/gradient mechanics.

  • 41.
    Melianas, Armantas
    et al.
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States; Exponent, 149 Commonwealth Dr, Menlo Park, 94025, CA, United States.
    Kang, Mina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    VahidMohammadi, Armin
    A. J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, United States.
    Quill, Tyler James
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States.
    Tian, Weiqian
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    A. J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, United States.
    Salleo, Alberto
    Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, 94305, CA, United States.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    High-Speed Ionic Synaptic Memory Based on 2D Titanium Carbide MXene2022In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 2109970-, article id 2109970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synaptic devices with linear high-speed switching can accelerate learning in artificial neural networks (ANNs) embodied in hardware. Conventional resistive memories however suffer from high write noise and asymmetric conductance tuning, preventing parallel programming of ANN arrays. Electrochemical random-access memories (ECRAMs), where resistive switching occurs by ion insertion into a redox-active channel, aim to address these challenges due to their linear switching and low noise. ECRAMs using 2D materials and metal oxides however suffer from slow ion kinetics, whereas organic ECRAMs enable high-speed operation but face challenges toward on-chip integration due to poor temperature stability of polymers. Here, ECRAMs using 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx) MXene that combine the high speed of organics and the integration compatibility of inorganic materials in a single high-performance device are demonstrated. These ECRAMs combine the speed, linearity, write noise, switching energy, and endurance metrics essential for parallel acceleration of ANNs, and importantly, they are stable after heat treatment needed for back-end-of-line integration with Si electronics. The high speed and performance of these ECRAMs introduces MXenes, a large family of 2D carbides and nitrides with more than 30 stoichiometric compositions synthesized to date, as promising candidates for devices operating at the nexus of electrochemistry and electronics.

  • 42.
    Mongkhontreerat, Surinthra
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Walter, Marie V.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Andrén, Oliver C. J.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Cai, Yanling
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Malkoch, Michael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Beyond state of the art honeycomb membranes: High performance ordered arrays from multi-programmable linear-dendritic block copolymers2015In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new generation of honeycomb membranes is herein described from a novel library of multipurpose linear-dendritic block copolymers. These are accomplished by combining atom transfer radical polymerization together with dendrimer chemistry and click reactions. The resulted amorphous block copolymers, with T-g between 30 and 40 degrees C, display three important functions, i.e., pore generating aromatic groups, crosslinking azides, and multiple dendritic functional groups. All block copolymers enable the successful fabrication of honeycomb membranes through the facile breath figure method. The peripheral dendritic functionality is found to influence the porous morphologies from closed pored structure with pore size of 1.12 mu m(2) to open pore structure with pore size 10.26 mu m(2). Facile UV crosslinking of the azides yields membranes with highly durable structural integrity. Upon crosslinking, the pH and thermal stability are extended beyond the noncrosslinked membranes in which the porous integrity is maintained up to 400 degrees C and pH 1-14. Taking into account the straightforward and cost-efficient strategy to generate ordered, functional, and structurally stable honeycomb membranes on various solid substrates, it is apparent that these multipurpose block copolymers may unlock future applications including use as molds for soft lithography.

  • 43.
    Naureen, Shagufta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Shahid, Naeem
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Sanatinia, Reza
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Anand, Srinivasan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Material Physics, Semiconductor Materials, HMA.
    Top-Down Fabrication of High Quality III–V Nanostructures by Monolayer Controlled Sculpting and Simultaneous Passivation2013In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 23, no 13, p. 1620-1627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the fabrication of IIIV semiconductor nanostructures for electronic and optoelectronic devices, techniques that are capable of removing material with monolayer precision are as important as material growth to achieve best device performances. A robust chemical treatment is demonstrated using sulfur (S)-oleylamine (OA) solution, which etches layer by layer in an inverse epitaxial fashion and simultaneously passivates the surface. The application of this process to push the limits of top-down nanofabrication is demonstrated by the realization of InP-based high optical quality nanowire arrays, with aspect ratios more than 50, and nanostructures with new topologies. The findings are relevant for other IIIV semiconductors and have potential applications in IIIV device technologies.

  • 44. Nicolas-Boluda, A.
    et al.
    Yang, Z.
    Dobryden, Illia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Carn, F.
    Winckelmans, N.
    Péchoux, C.
    Bonville, P.
    Bals, S.
    Claesson, P. M.
    Gazeau, F.
    Pileni, M. P.
    Intracellular Fate of Hydrophobic Nanocrystal Self-Assemblies in Tumor Cells2020In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 30, no 40, article id 2004274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Control of interactions between nanomaterials and cells remains a biomedical challenge. A strategy is proposed to modulate the intralysosomal distribution of nanoparticles through the design of 3D suprastructures built by hydrophilic nanocrystals (NCs) coated with alkyl chains. The intracellular fate of two water-dispersible architectures of self-assembled hydrophobic magnetic NCs: hollow deformable shells (colloidosomes) or solid fcc particles (supraballs) is compared. These two self-assemblies display increased cellular uptake by tumor cells compared to dispersions of the water-soluble NC building blocks. Moreover, the self-assembly structures increase the NCs density in lysosomes and close to the lysosome membrane. Importantly, the structural organization of NCs in colloidosomes and supraballs are maintained in lysosomes up to 8 days after internalization, whereas initially dispersed hydrophilic NCs are randomly aggregated. Supraballs and colloidosomes are differently sensed by cells due to their different architectures and mechanical properties. Flexible and soft colloidosomes deform and spread along the biological membranes. In contrast, the more rigid supraballs remain spherical. By subjecting the internalized suprastructures to a magnetic field, they both align and form long chains. Overall, it is highlighted that the mechanical and topological properties of the self-assemblies direct their intracellular fate allowing the control intralysosomal density, ordering, and localization of NCs.

  • 45. Rehman, Hafeez Ur
    et al.
    Chen, Yujie
    Hedenqvist, Mikael S.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Hua
    Xue, Wenchao
    Guo, Yunlong
    Guo, Yiping
    Duan, Huanan
    Liu, Hezhou
    Self-Healing Shape Memory PUPCL Copolymer with High Cycle Life2018In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 28, no 7, article id 1704109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New polyurethane-based polycaprolactone copolymer networks, with shape recovery properties, are presented here. Once deformed at ambient temperature, they show 100% shape fixation until heated above the melting point, where they recover the initial shape within 22 s. In contrast to current shape memory materials, the new materials do not require deformation at elevated temperature. The stable polymer structure of polyurethane yields a copolymer network that has strength of 10 MPa with an elongation at break of 35%. The copolymer networks are self-healing at a slightly elevated temperature (70 degrees C) without any external force, which is required for existing self-healing materials. This allows for the new materials to have a long life of repeated healing cycles. The presented copolymers show features that are promising for applications as temperature sensors and activating elements.

  • 46. Rizwan, M.
    et al.
    Fokina, A.
    Kivijärvi, Tove
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
    Ogawa, M.
    Kufleitner, M.
    Laselva, O.
    Smith, L. J.
    Bear, C. E.
    Ogawa, S.
    Keller, G.
    Shoichet, M. S.
    Photochemically Activated Notch Signaling Hydrogel Preferentially Differentiates Human Derived Hepatoblasts to Cholangiocytes2021In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 2006116-, article id 2006116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cholangiocytes form an intricate network of bile ducts to enable proper liver function; yet, recapitulating human stem cell differentiation to cholangiocytes in vitro requires Notch signaling and soluble ligands do not activate the Notch pathway. To overcome these limitations, jagged1 is immobilized on a chemically defined hyaluronan to specifically differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatoblasts to cholangiocytes. Hepatoblasts cultured on the jagged1-hydrogels upregulate Notch target genes and express key cholangiocyte markers including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Moreover, cholangiocytes adopt morphological changes that resemble liver biliary structures. To emulate natural biliary system development, a new strategy is developed to achieve spatiotemporal control over the Jagged1–Notch2 interaction: jagged1 is first caged with a photocleavable streptavidin and then it is uncaged photochemically to restore the biological function of Jagged1, which is confirmed with Notch2 activation in a fluorescent reporter cell line. Moreover, the differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatoblasts to cholangiocytes is temporally controlled with photochemical uncaging of this streptavidin-Jagged1-immobilized hyaluronan hydrogel. This strategy defines a framework to control protein signaling in time and space and specifically for Notch signaling for ultimate use in regenerative medicine strategies of the liver.

  • 47. Shi, Shengwei
    et al.
    Sun, Zhengyi
    Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar
    Graziosi, Patrizio
    Li, Xin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Hueso, Luis
    Dediu, Valentin A.
    Luo, Yi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Hybrid Interface States and Spin Polarization at Ferromagnetic Metal-Organic Heterojunctions: Interface Engineering for Efficient Spin Injection in Organic Spintronics2014In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 24, no 30, p. 4812-4821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ferromagnetic metal-organic semiconductor (FM-OSC) hybrid interfaces have been shown to play an important role for spin injection in organic spintronics. Here, 11,11,12,12-tetracyanonaptho-2,6-quinodimethane (TNAP) is introduced as an interfacial layer in Co-OSCs heterojunctions with an aim to tune the spin injection. The Co/TNAP interface is investigated by use of X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). Hybrid interface states (HIS) are observed at Co/TNAP interfaces, resulting from chemical interactions between Co and TNAP. The energy level alignment at the Co/TNAP/OSCs interface is also obtained, and a reduction of the hole injection barrier is demonstrated. XMCD results confirm sizeable spin polarization at the Co/TNAP hybrid interface.

  • 48. Stuer, Michael
    et al.
    Bowen, Paul
    Cantoni, Marco
    Pecharroman, Carlos
    Zhao, Zhe
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Ceramics.
    Nanopore Characterization and Optical Modeling of Transparent Polycrystalline Alumina2012In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 2303-2309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of transparent ceramics has become a topic of resurgent interest in recent years, with its promise of near-net shaping appealing to applications ranging from biomedicine to solar energy. However, the mechanisms governing ceramic transparency, translucency, and opaqueness are not entirely understood. Models of both grain boundary and pore scattering have been proposed, but too often without sufficient experimental corroboration. An extensive experimental analysis of transparent alumina samples is presented, establishing a first direct link between the observed transparency, defect size, and porosity. Given the unprecedented experimental detail from the full 3D pore reconstruction from the FIB tomography, how to correctly interpret the experimentally observed transparency is additionally shown. The unprecedented experimental and theoretical agreement for the first time identifies the relative contributions of different scattering mechanisms, thereby paving the way forward for microstructural tuning of transparent polycrystalline alumina.

  • 49.
    Su, Yingchun
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Xue, Han
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Fu, Yujie
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Chen, Shiqian
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Li, Zheng
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Li, Lengwan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Knoks, Ainars
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Bogdanova, Olga
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Lesničenoks, Pēteris
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Palmbahs, Roberts
    Institute of Solid State Physics University of Latvia Riga LV‐1063 Latvia.
    Laurila, Mika‐Matti
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences Tampere University Tampere 33720 Finland.
    Mäntysalo, Matti
    Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences Tampere University Tampere 33720 Finland.
    Hammar, Mattias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Hallén, Anders
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Nordell, Nils
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Electrum Laboratory, ELAB.
    Li, Jiantong
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Embedded systems.
    Monolithic Fabrication of Metal‐Free On‐Paper Self‐Charging Power Systems2024In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-charging power systems (SCPSs) are envisioned as promising solutions for emerging electronics to mitigate the increasing global concern about battery waste. However, present SCPSs suffer from large form factors, unscalable fabrication, and material complexity. Herein, a type of highly stable, eco-friendly conductive inks based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are developed for direct ink writing of multiple components in the SCPSs, including electrodes for miniaturized spacer-free triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and microsupercapacitors (MSCs), and interconnects. The principle of “one ink, multiple functions” enables to almost fully print the entire SCPSs on the same paper substrate in a monolithic manner without post-integration. The monolithic fabrication significantly improves the upscaling capability for manufacturing and reduces the form factor of the entire SCPSs (a small footprint area of ≈2 cm × 3 cm and thickness of ≈1 mm). After pressing/releasing the TENGs for ≈79000 cycles, the 3-cell series-connected MSC array can be charged to 1.6 V while the 6-cell array to 3.0 V. On-paper SCPSs are promising to serve as lightweight, thin, sustainable, and low-cost power supplies. 

  • 50. Tian, Haining
    et al.
    Yang, Xichuan
    Pan, Jingxi
    Chen, Ruikui
    Liu, Ming
    Zhang, Qingyu
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    A Triphenylamine Dye Model for the Study of Intramolecular Energy Transfer and Charge Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2008In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 18, no 21, p. 3461-3468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel dye (2TPA-R), containing two triphenylamine (TPA) units connected by a vinyl group and rhodanine-3-acetic acid as the electron acceptor, is designed and synthesized successfully to reveal the working principles of organic dye in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). 2TPA and TPA-R, which consist of two TPA units connected by vinyl and a TPA unit linked with rhodanine-3-acetic acid, respectively, are also synthesized as references to study the intramolecular energy transfer (EnT) and charge transfer (ICT) processes of 2TPA-R in CH2Cl2 solution and on a TiO2 surface. The results suggest that the intramolecular EnT and ICT processes show a positive effect on the performance of DSSCs. However, the flexible structure and less-adsorbed amount of dye on TiO2 may make it difficult to improve the efficiency of DSSCs. This study on intramolecular EnT and ICT processes acts as a guide for the design and synthesis of efficient organic dyes in the future.

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