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  • 1.
    Ersson, Mikael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Materials Processing.
    Colocated pressure-velocity coupling in finite difference methods2019In: Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, ISSN 1468-4349, E-ISSN 1741-5233, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method to be used for colocated pressure-velocity coupling in incompressible flows is presented with a full derivation. A number of standard test cases are shown that demonstrate the ability of the method to produce accurate results. The method avoids spurious pressure oscillations while keeping the pressure Poisson equation stencil compact. This is obtained by discretising the continuity and pressure derivatives with first order differences with opposite directions, i.e., backward difference for continuity and forward difference for pressure (BCFP). The equations are also approximated using a forward difference for continuity and a backward difference for pressure (FCBP). In order to obtain a second order approximation the mean between BCFP and FCBP is used, i.e., a central difference. The paper gives a useful alternative to existing methods for pressure-velocity coupling in finite difference methods in which a staggered arrangement is not desirable.

  • 2.
    Kohlstädt, Sebastian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Vynnycky, Michael
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Neubauer, Alexander
    Volkswagen AG, Div Components Mfg, Business Unit Casting, Dr Rudolf Leiding Pl 1, D-34225 Baunatal, Germany..
    Gebauer-Teichmann, Andreas
    Volkswagen AG, Div Components Mfg, Business Unit Casting, Dr Rudolf Leiding Pl 1, D-34225 Baunatal, Germany..
    Comparative RANS turbulence modelling of lost salt core viability in high pressure die casting2019In: Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, ISSN 1468-4349, E-ISSN 1741-5233, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 316-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the implementation of three turbulence models inside the open source C++ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) library OpenFOAM were tested in 2D and 3D to determine the viability of salt cores in high pressure die casting. A finite-volume and volume of fluid approach was used to model the two-phase flow of molten metal and air, with the latter being treated as compressible. Encouragingly, it is found that, although the choice of turbulence model seems to affect the dispersion of the two-phase interface, the force acting at the surface of the salt core depends only very weakly on the turbulence model used. The results were also compared against those obtained using the commercially available and widely-used casting software MAGMA(5).

  • 3.
    Lucas, Carlos
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Yang, Weihong
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Ponzio, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Blasiak, Wlodzimierz
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Energy and Furnace Technology.
    Bin Yang, Yao
    Sharifi, Vida N.
    Swithenbank, Jim
    Mathematical model of biomass gasification using high temperature air in fixed beds2007In: Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, ISSN 1468-4349, E-ISSN 1741-5233, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mathematical model has been formulated for predicting the main chemical and physical processes taking place during the fixed-bed gasification of biomass fuels using high temperature air (up to 1000 degrees C). Predicted gas species concentrations profiles and their maximum values are in good agreement with measurements. The results also show that when the temperature of feed gas (air) is increased a higher gasification rate, higher molar fractions of fuel gases (CO, H-2 and CmHn) are obtained, thus resulting in a higher LHV. At a high flow rate of the feed gases, the peaks of the fuel gas concentrations are slightly increased, and the gasification rate is strongly increased. A smaller particle size of the biomass fuels leads to higher peak values of the fuel gas species molar fractions, and a more stable gasification zone for a relatively long period of time.

  • 4. Winkler, C.
    et al.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics.
    Multicomponent surfactant mass transfer in GTA-welding2005In: Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, ISSN 1468-4349, E-ISSN 1741-5233, Vol. 5, no 05-mar, p. 190-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mathematical model simulating multicomponent, surfactant mass transfer in the liquid region arising in the specimen directly beneath the electrode during GTA-welding is developed. The sorption controlled surfactant mass transfer is due to convection and diffusion in the surface and bulk liquid regions. Interaction coefficients and multicomponent Langmuir adsorption isotherms are used to consider the interaction between the several surfactants involved. The model is added to a mathematical formulation that is often used for GTA-welding, and is finally used to calculate the fluid and heat flow and surfactant distributions in the weld pool. In the simulations, GTA-welding on stainless steel plates for a ternary Fe-S-O system is considered for varying surfactant concentrations and for varying heat input conditions. A very good agreement between numerically obtained and corresponding experimental weld pool shapes is found. Thus, it is shown that previous shortcomings in modelling of GTA-welding can be overcome if multicomponent surfactant mass transfer is considered.

  • 5. Yang, Zhi Lin
    et al.
    Ma, Weimin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Direct numerical simulation of dynamic three-fluid flow2007In: Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, ISSN 1468-4349, E-ISSN 1741-5233, Vol. 7, no 2-4, p. 176-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three-fluid flow is characterised by three different interfaces between fluids, which are among the most important issues in a three-fluid flow. The objective of this paper is to track the dynamic interfaces between fluids implicitly and then to computerise the flow hydrodynamics. We use the level-set method for the interface tracking and a high-order Navier-Stokes solver, called Cubic-Interpolated Pseudo-Particle (CIP) algorithm to solve the equation system. Firstly, a two-fluid situation is simulated to demonstrate the capability of the level-set method. Then, as an example, we simulate a drop which is covered by a layer of gas/vapour and is moving in a water pool. The dynamic processes, such as deformation of vapour layer and its detachment from the drop, are simulated.

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