Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Broman, Lars Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, ECMO Ctr Karolinska, Dept Pediat Perioperat Med & Intens Care, Eugeniavagen 23, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.;EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, BioMEx.
    Westlund, C. Jerker
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, ECMO Ctr Karolinska, Dept Pediat Perioperat Med & Intens Care, Eugeniavagen 23, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gilbers, Martijn
    Maastricht Univ, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Heart & Vasc Ctr, Cardiovasc Res Inst Maastricht CARIM,Med Hosp, Maastricht, Netherlands.;Maastricht Univ, Dept Physiol, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    da Camara, Luisa Perry
    Hosp Curry Cabral, Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Swol, Justyna
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Paracelsus Med Univ, Dept Pulmonol, Intens Care Med, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Taccone, Fabio S.
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;ULB, Dept Intens Care, Hop Erasme, Brussels, Belgium..
    Malfertheiner, Maximilian V.
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Pneumol 2, Regensburg, Germany..
    Di Nardo, Matteo
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Childrens Hosp Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Pediat Intens Care Unit, Rome, Italy..
    Vercaemst, Leen
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Perfus, Leuven, Belgium..
    Barrett, Nicholas A.
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Crit Care, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Severe Resp Failure Serv, London, England..
    Pappalardo, Federico
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Adv Heart Failure & Mech Circulatory Support Prog, Hosp San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Belohlavek, Jan
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Charles Univ Prague, Gen Univ Hosp Prague, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med 2, Prague, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Mueller, Thomas
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Pneumol 2, Regensburg, Germany..
    Belliato, Mirko
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Fdn IRCCS Policlin San Matteo, UOC Anestesia & Rianimaz 1, Pavia, Italy..
    Lorusso, Roberto
    EuroElso, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Maastricht Univ, Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Heart & Vasc Ctr, Cardiovasc Res Inst Maastricht CARIM,Med Hosp, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    Pressure and flow properties of cannulae for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation I: return (arterial) cannulae2019In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 34, p. 58-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adequate extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in the adult requires cannulae permitting blood flows up to 6-8 L/minute. In accordance with Poiseuille's law, flow is proportional to the fourth power of cannula inner diameter and inversely proportional to its length. Poiseuille's law can be applied to obtain the pressure drop of an incompressible, Newtonian fluid (such as water) flowing in a cylindrical tube. However, as blood is a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid, the validity of Poiseuille's law is questionable for prediction of cannula properties in clinical practice. Pressure-flow charts with non-Newtonian fluids, such as blood, are typically not provided by the manufacturers. A standardized laboratory test of return (arterial) cannulae for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was performed. The aim was to determine pressure-flow data with human whole blood in addition to manufacturers' water tests to facilitate an appropriate choice of cannula for the desired flow range. In total, 14 cannulae from three manufacturers were tested. Data concerning design, characteristics, and performance were graphically presented for each tested cannula. Measured blood flows were in most cases 3-21% lower than those provided by manufacturers. This was most pronounced in the narrow cannulae (15-17 Fr) where the reduction ranged from 27% to 40% at low flows and 5-15% in the upper flow range. These differences were less apparent with increasing cannula diameter. There was a marked disparity between manufacturers. Based on the measured results, testing of cannulae including whole blood flows in a standardized bench test would be recommended.

  • 2.
    Broman, Lars Mikael
    et al.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat Perioperat Med & Intens Care, ECMO Ctr Karolinska, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.;EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, BioMEx.
    Westlund, C. Jerker
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat Perioperat Med & Intens Care, ECMO Ctr Karolinska, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gilbers, Martijn
    Maastricht Univ, Hosp Med, Cardiovasc Res Inst Maastricht CARIM, Heart & Vasc Ctr,Dept Cardiothorac Surg, Maastricht, Netherlands.;Maastricht Univ, Dept Physiol, Maastricht, Netherlands..
    da Camara, Luisa Perry
    Hosp Curry Cabral, Ctr Hosp Lisboa Cent, Lisbon, Portugal..
    Westin, Jan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Taccone, Fabio Silvio
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;ULB, Dept Intens Care, Hop Erasme, Brussels, Belgium..
    Malfertheiner, Maximilian Valentin
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Pneumol 2, Regensburg, Germany..
    Di Nardo, Matteo
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Childrens Hosp Bambino Gesu, IRCCS, Pediat Intens Care Unit, Rome, Italy..
    Swol, Justyna
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Paracelsus Med Univ, Dept Pulmonol, Intens Care Med, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Vercaemst, Leen
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Hosp Gasthuisberg, Dept Perfus, Louven, Belgium..
    Barrett, Nicholas A.
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Dept Crit Care, London, England.;Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Severe Resp Failure Serv, London, England..
    Pappalardo, Federico
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Vita Salute San Raffaele, Hosp San Raffaele, Adv Heart Failure & Mech Circulatory Support Prog, Milan, Italy..
    Belohlavek, Jan
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Charles Univ Prague, Dept Med 2, Dept Cardiovasc Med, Gen Univ Hosp Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.;Charles Univ Prague, Fac Med 1, Prague, Czech Republic..
    Mueller, Thomas
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Univ Med Ctr Regensburg, Dept Internal Med Cardiol & Pneumol 2, Regensburg, Germany..
    Belliato, Mirko
    EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Fdn IRCCS Policlin San Matteo, UOC Anestesia & Rianimaz 1, Pavia, Italy..
    Lorusso, Roberto
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, BioMEx. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. EuroELSO, Working Grp Innovat & Technol, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Pressure and flow properties of cannulae for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation II: drainage (venous) cannulae2019In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 34, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of extracorporeal life support devices such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults requires cannulation of the patient's vessels with comparatively large diameter cannulae to allow circulation of large volumes of blood (>5 L/min). The cannula diameter and length are the major determinants for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation flow. Manufacturing companies present pressure-flow charts for the cannulae; however, these tests are performed with water. Aims of this study were 1. to investigate the specified pressure-flow charts obtained when using human blood as the circulating medium and 2. to support extracorporeal membrane oxygenation providers with pressure-flow data for correct choice of the cannula to reach an optimal flow with optimal hydrodynamic performance. Eighteen extracorporeal membrane oxygenation drainage cannulae, donated by the manufacturers (n = 6), were studied in a centrifugal pump driven mock loop. Pressure-flow properties and cannula features were described. The results showed that when blood with a hematocrit of 27% was used, the drainage pressure was consistently higher for a given flow (range 10%-350%) than when water was used (data from each respective manufacturer's product information). It is concluded that the information provided by manufacturers in line with regulatory guidelines does not correspond to clinical performance and therefore may not provide the best guidance for clinicians.

  • 3. Donker, D. W.
    et al.
    Meuwese, C. L.
    Braithwaite, S. A.
    Broomé, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van der Heijden, J. J.
    Hermens, J. A.
    Platenkamp, M.
    de Jong, M.
    Janssen, J. G. D.
    Balík, M.
    Bělohlávek, J.
    Echocardiography in extracorporeal life support: A key player in procedural guidance, tailoring and monitoring2018In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 33, no 1_suppl, p. 31-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is a mainstay of current practice in severe respiratory, circulatory or cardiac failure refractory to conventional management. The inherent complexity of different ECLS modes and their influence on the native pulmonary and cardiovascular system require patient-specific tailoring to optimize outcome. Echocardiography plays a key role throughout the ECLS care, including patient selection, adequate placement of cannulas, monitoring, weaning and follow-up after decannulation. For this purpose, echocardiographers require specific ECLS-related knowledge and skills, which are outlined here.

  • 4.
    Donker, Dirk W.
    et al.
    Univ Utrecht, Dept Intens Care Med, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brodie, Daniel
    Columbia Univ, Coll Phys & Surg, New York Presbyterian Hosp, Div Pulm Allergy & Crit Care Med, New York, NY USA..
    Henriques, Jose P. S.
    Univ Amsterdam, Dept Cardiol, Acad Med Ctr, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Broomé, Michael
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Medical Engineering, Medical Imaging.
    Left ventricular unloading during veno-arterial ECMO: a review of percutaneous and surgical unloading interventions2019In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 98-105Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Short-term mechanical support by veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) is more and more applied in patients with severe cardiogenic shock. A major shortcoming of VA ECMO is its variable, but inherent increase of left ventricular (LV) mechanical load, which may aggravate pulmonary edema and hamper cardiac recovery. In order to mitigate these negative sequelae of VA ECMO, different adjunct LV unloading interventions have gained a broad interest in recent years. Here, we review the whole spectrum of percutaneous and surgical techniques combined with VA ECMO reported to date.

  • 5. Larsson, M.
    et al.
    Talving, P.
    Palmér, K.
    Frenckner, B.
    Riddez, L.
    Broomé, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Experimental extracorporeal membrane oxygenation reduces central venous pressure: an adjunct to control of venous hemorrhage?2010In: Perfusion, ISSN 0267-6591, E-ISSN 1477-111X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 217-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Venoarterial ECMO has been utilized in trauma patients to improve oxygenation, particularly in the setting of pulmonary contusions and ARDS. We hypothesized that venoarterial ECMO could reduce the central venous pressure in the trauma scenario, thus, alleviating major venous hemorrhage. Methods: Ten swine were cannulated for venoarterial ECMO. Central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, portal vein pressure and portal vein flow were recorded at three different flow rates in both a hemodynamic normal state and a setting of increased central venous pressure and right ventricular load, mimicking acute lung injury. Results: Venoarterial ECMO reduced the central venous pressure (CVP(sup)) from 9.4 +/- 0.8 to 7.3 +/- 0.7 mmHg (p < 0.01) and increased the mean arterial pressure from 103 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 10 mmHg (p < 0.01) in the normal hemodynamic state. In the state of increased right ventricular load, the CVP(sup) declined from 14.3 +/- 0.4 to 11.0 +/- 0.7mmHg (p < 0.01) and the mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased from 66 +/- 6 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Venoarterial ECMO reduces systemic venous pressure while maintaining or improving systemic perfusion in both a normal circulatory state and in the setting of increased right ventricular load associated with acute lung injury. ECMO may be a useful tool in reducing blood loss during major venous hemorrhage in both trauma and selected elective surgery.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf