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  • 1. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björksten, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Gut microbiota diversity and atopic disease: Does breast-feeding play a role? Reply2013In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 131, no 1, p. 248-249Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Abrahamsson, Thomas R.
    et al.
    Jakobsson, Hedvig E.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Engstrand, Lars
    Jenmalm, Maria C.
    Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema2012In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 129, no 2, p. 434-U244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is debated whether a low total diversity of the gut microbiota in early childhood is more important than an altered prevalence of particular bacterial species for the increasing incidence of allergic disease. The advent of powerful, cultivation-free molecular methods makes it possible to characterize the total microbiome down to the genus level in large cohorts. OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to atopic eczema development. METHODS: Microbial diversity and composition were analyzed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454-pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months of age in 20 infants with IgE-associated eczema and 20 infants without any allergic manifestation until 2 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830). RESULTS: Infants with IgE-associated eczema had a lower diversity of the total microbiota at 1 month (P= .004) and a lower diversity of the bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes and the genus Bacteroides at 1 month (P= .02 and P= .01) and the phylum Proteobacteria at 12 months of age (P= .02). The microbiota was less uniform at 1 month than at 12 months of age, with a high interindividual variability. At 12 months, when the microbiota had stabilized, Proteobacteria, comprising gram-negative organisms, were more abundant in infants without allergic manifestation (Empirical Analysis of Digital Gene Expression in R edgeR test: P= .008, q= 0.02). CONCLUSION: Low intestinal microbial diversity during the first month of life was associated with subsequent atopic eczema.

  • 3. Nilsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Linde, Annika
    Montgomery, Scott M.
    Gustafsson, Liselotte
    Näsman, Per
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics, Safety Research.
    Blomberg, Marta Troye
    Lilja, Gunnar
    Does early EBV infection protect against IgE sensitization?2005In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 438-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is indirect evidence that an increased infectious burden is associated with a decreased prevalence of IgE-mediated allergy during childhood. Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between the serostatus of 13 different viruses and parentally reported infections and IgE sensitization in 2-year-old children. To investigate whether there is an interaction between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in relation to IgE sensitization. Methods: A total of 246 infants were followed prospectively to 2 years of age with clinical examinations, skin prick test, and specific IgE analyses and through analysis of seropositivity against adenovirus, influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, CMV, EBV, herpes simplex virus, human herpesvirus 6, and varicella-zoster virus. Results: There was some evidence that IgE sensitization (24%) tended to be more common among children who were seropositive against few compared with children who were seropositive against many viruses, but this was not statistically significant, and there was no consistent trend across the groups. IgE sensitization was statistically significantly less prevalent at 2 years of age among infants who were seropositive against EBV but not other viruses (adjusted odds ratio, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.14-0.86). The interaction of seropositivity against both CMV and EBV antibodies indicated a further reduction in the risk for IgE sensitization (adjusted odds ratio for interaction, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.01-0.92), indicating effect modification associated with seropositivity against CMV. Conclusion: Our results indicate that acquisition of EBV infection during the first 2 years of life is associated with a reduced risk of IgE sensitization, and this effect is enhanced by CMV coinfection.

  • 4.
    Schofield, James P. R.
    et al.
    Ctr Prote Res, Biol Sci, Southampton, Hants, England.;NIHR Southampton Biomed Res Ctr, Clin & Expt Sci, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Southampton, Inst Life Sci, Ctr Prote Res, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Mikus, Maria
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Affinity Proteomics.
    Sigmund, Ralf
    BI, Res Methodol & Biostat, Ingelheim, Germany..
    Stratification of asthma phenotypes by airway proteomic signatures2019In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Stratification by eosinophil and neutrophil counts increases our understanding of asthma and helps target therapy, but there is room for improvement in our accuracy in prediction of treatment responses and a need for better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Objective: We sought to identify molecular subphenotypes of asthma defined by proteomic signatures for improved stratification. Methods: Unbiased label-free quantitative mass spectrometry and topological data analysis were used to analyze the proteomes of sputum supernatants from 246 participants (206 asthmatic patients) as a novel means of asthma stratification. Microarray analysis of sputum cells provided transcriptomics data additionally to inform on underlying mechanisms. Results: Analysis of the sputum proteome resulted in 10 clusters (ie, proteotypes) based on similarity in proteomic features, representing discrete molecular subphenotypes of asthma. Overlaying granulocyte counts onto the 10 clusters as metadata further defined 3 of these as highly eosinophilic, 3 as highly neutrophilic, and 2 as highly atopic with relatively low granulocytic inflammation. For each of these 3 phenotypes, logistic regression analysis identified candidate protein biomarkers, and matched transcriptomic data pointed to differentially activated underlying mechanisms. Conclusion: This study provides further stratification of asthma currently classified based on quantification of granulocytic inflammation and provided additional insight into their underlying mechanisms, which could become targets for novel therapies.

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