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  • 1. Affatato, S.
    et al.
    Leardini, W.
    Jedenmalm, Anneli
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Ruggeri, O.
    Toni, A.
    Larger diameter bearings reduce wear in metal-on-metal hip implants2007In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, no 456, p. 153-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty has the longest clinical history of all total arthroplasties. We asked whether large diameter femoral heads would result in less wear than those with small diameters. We also asked if there is a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior. We tested three batches of cast high-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum hip implants (28 mm, 36 min, and 54 min diameters) in a hip simulator for 5 million cycles. We used bovine serum as lubricant and weighed the samples at regular intervals during testing. The 28-mm configuration had almost twice the wear of the 54-mm configuration, but we observed no difference between the 36-mm and the 54-mm configurations. The similarity in the wear performances of the larger configurations supports the presence of a threshold diameter that ensures good wear behavior.

  • 2.
    Lundblad, Henrik
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson-Thur, Charlotte
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Jonsson, Cathrine
    Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Noz, Marilyn E.
    New York University, Department of Radiology.
    Zeleznik, Michael P.
    University of Utah.
    Weidenhielm, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Solna.
    Can Spatiotemporal Fluoride (18F-ˆ’) Uptake be Used to Assess Bone Formation in the Tibia?: A Longitudinal Study Using PET/CT2017In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, Vol. 475, no 5, p. 1486-1498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When a bone is broken for any reason, it is important for the orthopaedic surgeon to know how bone healing is progressing. There has been resurgence in the use of the fluoride (18F-ˆ’) ion to evaluate various bone conditions. This has been made possible by availability of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT hybrid scanners together with cyclotrons. Absorbed on the bone surface from blood flow, 18F-ˆ’ attaches to the osteoblasts in cancellous bone and acts as a pharmacokinetic agent, which reflects the local physiologic activity of bone. This is important because it shows bone formation indicating that the bone is healing or no bone formation indicating no healing. As 18F-ˆ’ is extracted from blood in proportion to blood flow and bone formation, it thus enables determination of bone healing progress.

  • 3.
    Riad, Jacques
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Dept. of Women's and Children's Health.
    Modlesky, Christopher
    Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Biomechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Structural Mechanics.
    Broström, Eva W.
    Karolinska Institutet, Dept. of Women's and Children's Health.
    Are Muscle Volume Differences Related to Concentric Muscle Work During Walking in Spastic Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy?2012In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, ISSN 0009-921X, E-ISSN 1528-1132, Vol. 470, no 5, p. 1278-1285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Individuals with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy are typically high functioning and walk without assistive devices. The involved limb is usually smaller and shorter, although it is not clear whether the difference in muscle volume has an impact on walking capacity. Questions/purposes: We determined the volume of muscles important for propulsion and related that volume to concentric muscle work during walking on the hemiplegic and noninvolved sides in patients with cerebral palsy. Patients and Methods: We studied 46 patients (mean age, 17.6 years; range, 13-24 years) with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. We assessed muscle volume using MRI and concentric muscle work in the sagittal plane from the hip, knee, and ankle using three-dimensional gait analysis. Patients were classified by Winters' criteria to assess the involvement of cerebral palsy and movement pattern during walking. Results: On the hemiplegic side, muscles were smaller, except for the gracilis muscle, and concentric muscle work from the ankle plantar flexors, knee extensors, and hip flexors and extensors was lower compared to the noninvolved side. Hip extensor work was higher on the hemiplegic and the noninvolved sides compared to a control group of 14 subjects without cerebral palsy. Hemiplegic to noninvolved volume ratios correlated with work ratios (r = 0.40-0.66). The Winters classification and previous calf muscle surgery predicted work ratios. Conclusions: Our observations of smaller muscles on the hemiplegic side and changes in muscle work on both sides can help us distinguish between primary deviations that may potentially be treatable and compensatory mechanisms that should not be treated.

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