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  • 1. Apellaniz-Ruiz, Maria
    et al.
    Sanchez-Barroso, Lara
    Gutierrez-Gutierrez, Gerardo
    Sereno, Maria
    Garcia-Donas, Jesus
    Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Green, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Brosen, Kim
    Bergmann, Troels K.
    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina
    Replication of Genetic Polymorphisms Reported to Be Associated with Taxane-Related Sensory Neuropathy in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Paclitaxel-Letter2015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 13, p. 3092-3093Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Friboulet, Luc
    et al.
    Barrios-Gonzales, Daniel
    Commo, Frederic
    Olaussen, Ken Andre
    Vagner, Stephan
    Adam, Julien
    Goubar, Aicha
    Dorvault, Nicolas
    Lazar, Vladimir
    Job, Bastien
    Besse, Benjamin
    Validire, Pierre
    Girard, Philippe
    Lacroix, Ludovic
    Hasmats, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dufour, Fabienne
    Andre, Fabrice
    Soria, Jean-Charles
    Molecular Characteristics of ERCC1-Negative versus ERCC1-Positive Tumors in Resected NSCLC2011In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 5562-5572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a protein involved in repair of DNA platinum adducts and stalled DNA replication forks. We and others have previously shown the influence of ERCC1 expression upon survival rates and benefit of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of ERCC1-positive and ERCC1-negative tumors. Experimental Design: We took advantage of a cohort of 91 patients with resected NSCLC, for which we had matched frozen and paraffin-embedded samples to explore the comparative molecular portraits of ERCC1-positive and ERCC1-negative tumors of NSCLC. We carried out a global molecular analysis including assessment of ERCC1 expression levels by using both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), genomic instability, global gene and miRNA expression, and sequencing of selected key genes involved in lung carcinogenesis. Results: ERCC1 protein and mRNA expression were significantly correlated. However, we observed several cases with clear discrepancies. We noted that ERCC1-negative tumors had a higher rate of genomic abnormalities versus ERCC1-positive tumors. ERCC1-positive tumors seemed to share a common DNA damage response (DDR) phenotype with the overexpression of seven genes linked to DDR. The miRNA expression analysis identified miR-375 as significantly underexpressed in ERCC1-positive tumors. Conclusions: Our data show inconsistencies in ERCC1 expression between IHC and qRT-PCR readouts. Furthermore, ERCC1 status is not linked to specific mutational patterns or frequencies. Finally, ERCC1negative tumors have a high rate of genomic aberrations that could consequently influence prognosis in patients with resected NSCLC. Clin Cancer Res; 17(17); 5562-72.

  • 3.
    Green, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Linköping University, Sweden; National Board of Forensic Medicine, Sweden.
    Hasmats, Johanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kupershmidt, Ilya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. NextBio, USA.
    Edsgärd, Daniel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    de Petris, Luigi
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Blackhall, Fiona
    Vikingsson, Svante
    Besse, Benjamin
    Lindgren, Andrea
    Branden, Eva
    Koyi, Hirsh
    Peterson, Curt
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Using Whole-Exome Sequencing to Identify Genetic Markers for Carboplatin and Gemcitabine-Induced Toxicities2016In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 366-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Chemotherapies are associated with significant interindividual variability in therapeutic effect and adverse drug reactions. In lung cancer, the use of gemcitabine and carboplatin induces grade 3 or 4 myelosuppression in about a quarter of the patients, while an equal fraction of patients is basically unaffected in terms of myelosuppressive side effects. We therefore set out to identify genetic markers for gemcitabine/carboplatin-induced myelosuppression. Experimental Design: We exome sequenced 32 patients that suffered extremely high neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (grade 3 or 4 after first chemotherapy cycle) or were virtually unaffected (grade 0 or 1). The genetic differences/polymorphism between the groups were compared using six different bioinformatics strategies: (i) whole-exome nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants association analysis, (ii) deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, (iii) analysis of genes selected by a priori biologic knowledge, (iv) analysis of genes selected from gene expression meta-analysis of toxicity datasets, (v) Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and (vi) FunCoup network enrichment analysis. Results: A total of 53 genetic variants that differed among these groups were validated in an additional 291 patients and were correlated to the patients' myelosuppression. In the validation, we identified rs1453542 in OR4D6 (P = 0.0008; OR, 5.2; 95% CI, 1.8-18) as a marker for gemcitabine/carboplatin-induced neutropenia and rs5925720 in DDX53 (P = 0.0015; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.71) as a marker for thrombocytopenia. Patients homozygous for the minor allele of rs1453542 had a higher risk of neutropenia, and for rs5925720 the minor allele was associated with a lower risk for thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: We have identified two new genetic markers with the potential to predict myelosuppression induced by gemcitabine/ carboplatin chemotherapy.

  • 4. Kannan, P.
    et al.
    Kretzschmar, Warren W.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Winter, H.
    Warren, D.
    Bates, R.
    Allen, P. D.
    Syed, N.
    Irving, B.
    Papiez, B. W.
    Kaeppler, J.
    Markelc, B.
    Kinchesh, P.
    Gilchrist, S.
    Smart, S.
    Schnabel, J. A.
    Maughan, T.
    Harris, A. L.
    Muschel, R. J.
    Partridge, M.
    Sharma, R. A.
    Kersemans, V.
    Functional parameters derived from magnetic resonance imaging reflect vascular morphology in preclinical tumors and in human liver metastases2018In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 24, no 19, p. 4694-4704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Tumor vessels influence the growth and response of tumors to therapy. Imaging vascular changes in vivo using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has shown potential to guide clinical decision making for treatment. However, quantitative MR imaging biomarkers of vascular function have not been widely adopted, partly because their relationship to structural changes in vessels remains unclear. We aimed to elucidate the relationships between vessel function and morphology in vivo. Experimental Design: Untreated preclinical tumors with different levels of vascularization were imaged sequentially using DCE-MRI and CT. Relationships between functional parameters from MR (iAUC, Ktrans, and BATfrac) and structural parameters from CT (vessel volume, radius, and tortuosity) were assessed using linear models. Tumors treated with anti-VEGFR2 antibody were then imaged to determine whether antiangiogenic therapy altered these relationships. Finally, functional-structural relationships were measured in 10 patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Results: Functional parameters iAUC and Ktrans primarily reflected vessel volume in untreated preclinical tumors. The relationships varied spatially and with tumor vascularity, and were altered by antiangiogenic treatment. In human liver metastases, all three structural parameters were linearly correlated with iAUC and Ktrans. For iAUC, structural parameters also modified each other's effect. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that MR imaging biomarkers of vascular function are linked to structural changes in tumor vessels and that antiangiogenic therapy can affect this link. Our work also demonstrates the feasibility of three-dimensional functional-structural validation of MR biomarkers in vivo to improve their biological interpretation and clinical utility. 

  • 5. Leandro-Garcia, Luis J.
    et al.
    Leskelä, Susanna
    Jara, Carlos
    Gréen, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth
    Wheeler, Heather E.
    Dolan, M. Eileen
    Inglada-Perez, Lucia
    Maliszewska, Agnieszka
    de Cubas, Aguirre A.
    Comino-Mendez, Inaki
    Mancikova, Veronika
    Cascon, Alberto
    Robledo, Mercedes
    Rodriguez-Antona, Cristina
    Regulatory Polymorphisms in beta-Tubulin IIa Are Associated with Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy2012In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 18, no 16, p. 4441-4448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Peripheral neuropathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic drug widely used to treat several solid tumors such as breast, lung, and ovary. The cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel is mediated through beta-tubulin binding in the cellular microtubules. In this study, we investigated the association between paclitaxel neurotoxicity risk and regulatory genetic variants in beta-tubulin genes. Experimental Design: We measured variation in gene expression of three beta-tubulin isotypes (I, IVb, and IIa) in lymphocytes from 100 healthy volunteers, sequenced the promoter region to identify polymorphisms putatively influencing gene expression and assessed the transcription rate of the identified variants using luciferase assays. To determine whether the identified regulatory polymorphisms were associated with paclitaxel neurotoxicity, we genotyped them in 214 patients treated with paclitaxel. In addition, paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity in lymphoblastoid cell lines was compared with beta-tubulin expression as measured by Affymetrix exon array. Results: We found a 63-fold variation in beta-tubulin IIa gene (TUBB2A) mRNA content and three polymorphisms located at -101, -112, and -157 in TUBB2A promoter correlated with increased mRNA levels. The -101 and -112 variants, in total linkage disequilibrium, conferred TUBB2A increased transcription rate. Furthermore, these variants protected from paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy [HR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.42-0.93; P = 0.021, multivariable analysis]. In addition, an inverse correlation between TUBB2A and paclitaxel-induced apoptosis (P = 0.001) in lymphoblastoid cell lines further supported that higher TUBB2A gene expression conferred lower paclitaxel sensitivity. Conclusions: This is the first study showing that paclitaxel neuropathy risk is influenced by polymorphisms regulating the expression of a beta-tubulin gene.

  • 6.
    Thielen, Noortje
    et al.
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Richter, Johan
    Skåne university hospital, Sweden.
    Baldauf, Matthias
    Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria.
    Barbany, Gisela
    Karolinska institutet, Sweden.
    Fioretos, Thoas
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Giles, Francis
    RobertH. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, USA.
    Gjertsen, Bjorn-Tore
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Hochhaus, Andreas
    Universit€atsklinikum Jena, Germany.
    Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Sopper, Sieghart
    Innsbruck Medical University and Tyrolean Cancer Research Institute, Austria.
    Stenke, Leif
    Karolinska university hospital, Sweden.
    Thunberg, Sarah
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Cell Physics. Karolinska university hospital, Sweden.
    Wolf, Dominik
    University Clinic Bonn, Germany.
    Ossenkoppele, Gert
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Porkka, Kimmo
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Janssen, Jeroen
    VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.
    Mustjoki, Satu
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Leukemic Stem Cell Quantification in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Predicts Response to Nilotinib Therapy2016In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 22, no 16, p. 4030-4038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) may harbor important resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We identified Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive CD34(+)CD38(-) bone marrow cells (here denoted LSCs) and addressed their response-predictive value in patients with CML (n = 48) subjected to nilotinib in the ENEST1st trial (NCT01061177). Experimental design: Two flow cytometry-based cell sorting methods were used with multiparameter-directed CD45-(MPFC) and BCR-ABL1 probe-linked (FISH) identification of Ph-positive cells, respectively. Results: We observed a positive correlation between the proportion of LSCs at diagnosis and established prognostic markers (blast count, spleen size, Sokal score, and hemoglobin). Conversely, a high LSC burden predicted for an inferior molecular response at 3 (MPFC and FISH), 6 (MPFC), 9 (FISH), and 15 months (FISH). During nilotinib therapy, the proportion of LSCs decreased rapidly. At 3 months, a median of only 0.3% LSCs remained among CD34(+)CD38(-) cells, and in 33% of the patients the LSC clone was not detectable anymore (FISH). The response kinetics was similar in LSC fractions as it was in the progenitor and unseparated bone marrow cell fractions. Conclusions: The proportion of LSCs at diagnosis, as analyzed by two independent methodologies, reflects the biology of the disease and appeared as a prognostic and response-predictive marker in patients with CML subjected to first-line nilotinib therapy. (C) 2016 AACR.

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