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  • 1. Agnarsdottir, Margret
    et al.
    Sooman, Linda
    Bolander, Asa
    Stromberg, Sara
    Rexhepaj, Elton
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Gallagher, William
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Ekman, Simon
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Hedstrand, Hakan
    SOX10 expression in superficial spreading and nodular malignant melanomas2010In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 468-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX10 is a transcription factor expressed in nerve cells and melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protein expression pattern of SOX10 in malignant melanoma tumors and to analyze whether the results correlated with clinical parameters and the proliferation marker Ki-67. Furthermore, proliferation and migration were analyzed in three different cell lines employing SOX10 small interfering RNA-mediated silencing. Expression patterns were determined in 106 primary tumors and 39 metastases in addition to 16 normal skin samples and six benign nevi employing immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. The immunohistochemical staining was evaluated manually and with an automated algorithm. SOX10 was strongly expressed in the benign tissues, but for the malignant tumors superficial spreading melanomas stained stronger than nodular malignant melanomas (P = 0.008). The staining intensity was also inversely correlated with T-stage (Spearman's rho = -0.261, P = 0.008). Overall survival and time to recurrence were significantly correlated with SOX10 intensity, but not in multivariate analysis including T-stage. With the automated algorithm there was an inverse correlation between the SOX10 staining intensity and the proliferation marker, Ki-67 (rho = -0.173, P = 0.02) and a significant difference in the intensity signal between the benign tissues, the primary tumors and the metastases where the metastases stained the weakest (P <= 0.001). SOX10 downregulation resulted in variable effects on proliferation and migration rates in the melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, the SOX10 intensity level differed depending on the tissue studied and SOX10 might have a role in survival. No conclusion regarding the role of SOX10 for in-vitro proliferation and migration could be drawn. Melanoma Res 20:468-478

  • 2.
    Edlundh-Rose, Esther
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Egyhazi, Suzanne
    Omholt, Katarina
    Mansson-Brahme, Eva
    Platz, Anton
    Hansson, Johan
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    NRAS and BRAF mutations in melanoma turnours in re ation to clinical characteristics: a study based on mutation screening by pyrosequencing2006In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 471-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have previously demonstrated the use of pyrosequencing to investigate NRAS [neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog] mutations in melanoma biopsies. Here, we expanded the analysis to include BRAF (V-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog 1311), another member of the Ras-Raf-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, and analysed a total of 294 melanoma tumours from 219 patients. Mutations in BRAF exons 11 and 15 were identified in 156 (53%) tumours and NRAS exon 2 mutations in 86 (29%) tumours. Overall, mutations in NRAS or BRAF were found in 242 of 294 tumours; (82%) and were found to be mutually exclusive in all but two cases (0.7%). Multiple metastases were analysed in 57 of the cases and mutations were identical in all except three, indicating that BRAF and NRAS mutations occur before metastasis. Association with preexisting nevi was significantly higher in BRAF mutated tumours (P=0.014). In addition, tumours with BRAF mutations showed a significantly more frequent moderate to pronounced infiltration of lymphocytes (P=0.013). NRAS mutations were associated with a significantly higher Clark level of invasion (P=0.022) than BRAF mutations. Age at diagnosis was significantly higher in tumours with NRAS mutations than in those with BRAF mutations (P=0.019). NRAS and BRAF mutations, however, did not influence the overall survival from time of diagnosis (P=0.7). In conclusion, the separate genotypes were associated with differences in several key clinical and pathological parameters, indicating differences in the biology of melanoma tumours with different proto-oncogene mutations.

  • 3. Falkenius, Johan
    et al.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Hemming
    Tuominen, Rainer
    Frostvik-Stolt, Marianne
    Hansson, Johan
    Brage, Suzanne Egyhazi
    High expression of glycolytic and pigment proteins is associated with worse clinical outcome in stage III melanoma2013In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 452-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are insufficient numbers of prognostic factors available for prediction of clinical outcome in patients with stage III malignant cutaneous melanoma, even when known adverse pathological risk factors, such as macrometastasis, number of lymph node metastases, and ulceration are taken into consideration. The aim of this study was therefore to identify additional prognostic factors to better predict patients with a high risk of relapse, thus enabling us to better determine the need for adjuvant treatment in stage III disease. An RNA oligonucleotide microarray study was performed on first regional lymph node metastases in 42 patients with stage III melanoma: 23 patients with short-term survival (13 months) and 19 with long-term survival (60 months), to identify genes associated with clinical outcome. Candidate genes were validated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Several gene ontology (GO) categories were highly significantly differentially expressed including glycolysis (GO: 0006096; P<0.001) and the pigment biosynthetic process (GO: 0046148; P<0.001), in which overexpression was associated with short-disease-specific survival. Three overexpressed glycolytic genes, GAPDHS, GAPDH, and PKM2, and two pigment-related genes, TYRP1 and OCA2, were selected for validation. A significant difference in GAPDHS protein expression between short- and long-term survivors (P=0.021) and a trend for PKM2 (P=0.093) was observed in univariate analysis. Positive expression of at least two of four proteins (GAPDHS, GAPDH, PKM2, TYRP1) in immunohistochemical analysis was found to be an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-specific survival (P=0.011). Our results indicate that this prognostic panel in combination with established risk factors may contribute to an improved prediction of patients with a high risk of relapse.

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