Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 434
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Adiels, Martin
    et al.
    Mardinoglu, Adil
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Taskinen, Marja-Riitta
    Boren, Jan
    Kinetic Studies to Elucidate Impaired Metabolism of Triglyceride-rich Lipoproteins in Humans2015In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 6, article id 342Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To develop novel strategies for prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia, it is essential to understand the pathophysiology of dyslipoproteinemia in humans. Lipoprotein metabolism is a complex system in which abnormal concentrations of various lipoprotein particles can result from alterations in their rates of production, conversion, and/or catabolism. Traditional methods that measure plasma lipoprotein concentrations only provide static estimates of lipoprotein metabolism and hence limited mechanistic information. By contrast, the use of tracers labeled with stable isotopes and mathematical modeling, provides us with a powerful tool for probing lipid and lipoprotein kinetics in vivo and furthering our understanding of the pathogenesis of dyslipoproteinemia.

  • 2. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Bogdanovic, Nenad
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons2015In: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy, ISSN 1662-5129, E-ISSN 1662-5129, Vol. 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal promoting effects of NPS make the NPS NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 +/- 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions.

  • 3. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Barde, Swapnali
    Vas, Szilvia
    Ebner, Karl
    Su, Jie
    Svensson, Camilla
    Mathé, Aleksander A.
    Singewald, Nicolas
    Reinscheid, Rainer R.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kultima, Kim
    Bagdy, Gyorgy
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Exploring the role of neuropeptide S in the regulation of arousal: a functional anatomical study2016In: Brain Structure and Function, ISSN 1863-2653, E-ISSN 1863-2661, Vol. 221, no 7, p. 3521-3546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide expressed by limited number of neurons in the brainstem. The simultaneous anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effect of NPS suggests an involvement in mood control and vigilance, making the NPS-NPS receptor system an interesting potential drug target. Here we examined, in detail, the distribution of NPS-immunoreactive (IR) fiber arborizations in brain regions of rat known to be involved in the regulation of sleep and arousal. Such nerve terminals were frequently apposed to GABAergic/galaninergic neurons in the ventro-lateral preoptic area (VLPO) and to tyrosine hydroxylase-IR neurons in all hypothalamic/thalamic dopamine cell groups. Then we applied the single platform-on-water (mainly REM) sleep deprivation method to study the functional role of NPS in the regulation of arousal. Of the three pontine NPS cell clusters, the NPS transcript levels were increased only in the peri-coerulear group in sleep-deprived animals, but not in stress controls. The density of NPS-IR fibers was significantly decreased in the median preoptic nucleus-VLPO region after the sleep deprivation, while radioimmunoassay and mass spectrometry measurements showed a parallel increase of NPS in the anterior hypothalamus. The expression of the NPS receptor was, however, not altered in the VLPO-region. The present results suggest a selective activation of one of the three NPS-expressing neuron clusters as well as release of NPS in distinct forebrain regions after sleep deprivation. Taken together, our results emphasize a role of the peri-coerulear cluster in the modulation of arousal, and the importance of preoptic area for the action of NPS on arousal and sleep.

  • 4. Adori, Csaba
    et al.
    Glueck, Laura
    Barde, Swapnali
    Yoshitake, Takashi
    Kovacs, Gabor G.
    Mulder, Jan
    Magloczky, Zsofia
    Havas, Laszlo
    Boelcskei, Kata
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szolcsanyi, Janos
    Kehr, Jan
    Ronnback, Annica
    Schwartz, Thue
    Rehfeld, Jens F.
    Harkany, Tibor
    Palkovits, Miklos
    Schulz, Stefan
    Hokfelt, Tomas
    Critical role of somatostatin receptor 2 in the vulnerability of the central noradrenergic system: new aspects on Alzheimer's disease2015In: Acta Neuropathologica, ISSN 0001-6322, E-ISSN 1432-0533, Vol. 129, no 4, p. 541-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders are associated with deterioration of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), a probable trigger for mood and memory dysfunction. LC noradrenergic neurons exhibit particularly high levels of somatostatin binding sites. This is noteworthy since cortical and hypothalamic somatostatin content is reduced in neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet a possible role of a somatostatin signal deficit in the maintenance of noradrenergic projections remains unknown. Here, we deployed tissue microarrays, immunohistochemistry, quantitative morphometry and mRNA profiling in a cohort of Alzheimer's and age-matched control brains in combination with genetic models of somatostatin receptor deficiency to establish causality between defunct somatostatin signalling and noradrenergic neurodegeneration. In Alzheimer's disease, we found significantly reduced somatostatin protein expression in the temporal cortex, with aberrant clustering and bulging of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive afferents. As such, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) mRNA was highly expressed in the human LC, with its levels significantly decreasing from Braak stages III/IV and onwards, i.e., a process preceding advanced Alzheimer's pathology. The loss of SSTR2 transcripts in the LC neurons appeared selective, since tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, galanin or galanin receptor 3 mRNAs remained unchanged. We modeled these pathogenic changes in Sstr2 (-/-) mice and, unlike in Sstr1 (-/-) or Sstr4 (-/-) genotypes, they showed selective, global and progressive degeneration of their central noradrenergic projections. However, neuronal perikarya in the LC were found intact until late adulthood (< 8 months) in Sstr2 (-/-) mice. In contrast, the noradrenergic neurons in the superior cervical ganglion lacked SSTR2 and, as expected, the sympathetic innervation of the head region did not show any signs of degeneration. Our results indicate that SSTR2-mediated signaling is integral to the maintenance of central noradrenergic projections at the system level, and that early loss of somatostatin receptor 2 function may be associated with the selective vulnerability of the noradrenergic system in Alzheimer's disease.

  • 5.
    Afrasiabi, Roodabeh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Söderberg, Lovisa M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Joensson, Haakan N.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Björk, Per
    Svahn Andersson, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Linnros, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Integration of a Droplet-Based Microfluidic System and Silicon Nanoribbon FET Sensor2016In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 7, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a novel microfluidic system that integrates droplet microfluidics with a silicon nanoribbon field-effect transistor (SiNR FET), and utilize this integrated system to sense differences in pH. The device allows for selective droplet transfer to a continuous water phase, actuated by dielectrophoresis, and subsequent detection of the pH level in the retrieved droplets by SiNR FETs on an electrical sensor chip. The integrated microfluidic system demonstrates a label-free detection method for droplet microfluidics, presenting an alternative to optical fluorescence detection. In this work, we were able to differentiate between droplet trains of one pH-unit difference. The pH-based detection method in our integrated system has the potential to be utilized in the detection of biochemical reactions that induce a pH-shift in the droplets.

  • 6.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ren, Z P
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, F
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Pontén, J
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Genetic instability in the 9q22.3 region is a late event in the development of squamous cell carcinoma.1998In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 17, no 14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin represents a group of neoplasms which is associated with exposure to UV light. Recently, we obtained data suggesting that invasive skin cancer and its precursors derive from one original neoplastic clone. Here, the analysis were extended by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis in the chromosome 9q22.3 region. A total of 85 samples, taken from twenty-two sections of sun-exposed sites, corresponding to normal epidermis, morphological normal cells with positive immuno-staining for the p53 protein (p53 patches), dysplasias, cancer in situ (CIS) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the skin were analysed. Overall, about 70% of p53 patches had mutations in the p53 gene but not LOH in the p53 gene or 9q22.3 region. Approximately 70% of the dysplasias showed p53 mutations of which about 40% had LOH in the p53 region but not in the 9q22.3 region. In contrast, about 65% of SCC and CIS displayed LOH in the 9q22.3 region, as well as frequent (80%) mutations and/or LOH in the p53 gene. These findings strongly suggest that alterations in the p53 gene is an early event in the progression towards SCC, whereas malignant development involves LOH and alterations in at least one (or several) tumor suppressor genes located in chromosome 9q22.3.

  • 7.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Mansouri, Ladan
    Nopp, Anna
    Paulsson, Josefin M.
    Winqvist, Ola
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Stahl, Marten
    Hylander, Britta
    Jacobson, Stefan H.
    Lundahl, Joachim
    Activation of Basophils Is a New and Sensitive Marker of Biocompatibility in Hemodialysis2014In: Artificial Organs, ISSN 0160-564X, E-ISSN 1525-1594, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 945-953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hemodialysis procedure involves contact between peripheral blood and the surface of dialyzer membranes, which may lead to alterations in the pathways of innate and adaptive immunity. We aimed to study the effect of blood-membrane interaction on human peripheral basophils and neutrophils in hemodialysis with high- and low-permeability polysulfone dialyzers. The surface expression of CD203c (basophil selection marker) and CD63 (activation marker) after activation by the bacterial peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or anti-Fc epsilon receptor I (Fc epsilon RI) antibody and the absolute number of basophils was investigated before and after hemodialysis with each of the dialyzers. Moreover, the expression on neutrophils of CD11b, the CD11b active epitope, and CD88 was analyzed in the same groups of individuals. The expression of CD63 in basophils following activation by fMLP was significantly higher in the patient group compared with that in healthy controls, but no differences were observed after activation by anti-Fc epsilon RI. During the hemodialysis procedure, the low-flux membrane induced up-regulation of CD63 expression on basophils, while passage through the high-flux membrane did not significantly alter the responsiveness. In addition, the absolute number of basophils was unchanged after hemodialysis with either of the dialyzers and compared with healthy controls. We found no significant differences in the expression of the neutrophil activation markers (CD11b, the active epitope of CD11b, and CD88) comparing the two different dialyzers before and after dialysis and healthy controls. Together, these findings suggest that alterations in basophil activity may be a useful marker of membrane bioincompatibility in hemodialysis.

  • 8.
    Aljadi, Zenib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nopp, Anna
    Winqvist, Ola
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Hylander, Britta
    Jacobson, Stefan H.
    Lundahl, Joachim
    Altered basophil function in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis2017In: Clinical Nephrology, ISSN 0301-0430, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to impairment of immune cell function. Given the potential role of basophils in the pathogenesis of CKD, we aimed to study the basophil responsiveness towards microbial antigen exposure, judged as adhesion molecule expression and degranulation, in CKD patients on hemodialysis. Materials and methods: We selected markers linked to two crucial biological phases: the transmigration and degranulation processes, respectively. For the transmigration process, we selected the adhesion molecules CD11b, active CD11b epitope, and CD62L and for the degranulation process CD203c (piecemeal degranulation marker), CD63 (degranulation marker), and CD300a (inhibitory marker of degranulation). We measured basophil responsiveness after stimulation of different activation pathways in basophils using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), formyl-methyinoyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), and anti-FceRI-ab. Results: The expression of CD63 in basophils following activation by fMLP was significantly higher in the patient group compared to matched healthy controls, but no differences were observed after activation by anti-Fc.RI. CD300a expression was significantly higher in patients following activation by fMLP and anti-Fc.RI, and the active epitope CD11b expression was significantly higher in patients after LPS activation. In addition, we found that CD62L was not shed from the cell surface after activation with LPS and fMLP. A slight downregulation was noted after activation with anti-Fc.RI in healthy controls. Conclusion: Together, these data demonstrate that basophil functions related to adhesion and degranulation are altered in CKD patients on hemodialysis, which indicates a potential role for the basophil in the pathogenesis of complications related to infections.

  • 9. Alkasalias, Twana
    et al.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    Hennig, Katharina
    Danielsson, Frida
    Lebbink, Robert Jan
    Fielden, Matthew
    Turunen, S. Pauliina
    Lehti, Kaisa
    Kashuba, Vladimir
    Madapura, Harsha S.
    Bozoky, Benedek
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Balland, Martial
    Guven, Hayrettin
    Klein, George
    Gad, Annica K. B.
    Pavlova, Tatiana
    RhoA knockout fibroblasts lose tumor-inhibitory capacity in vitro and promote tumor growth in vivo2017In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 8, p. E1413-E1421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins over-expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of a-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth.

  • 10.
    Alm, Tove L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    The Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative.2016In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Alm, Tove L.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    ANTIBODYPEDIA: THE WIKI OF ANTIBODIES2016In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ISSN 1059-1524, E-ISSN 1939-4586, Vol. 27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Introducing the Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative-A public-private partnership for validation of affinity reagents2016In: EuPA Open Proteomics, ISSN 0014-2328, E-ISSN 2212-9685, Vol. 10, p. 56-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newly launched Affinity Binder Knockdown Initiative encourages antibody suppliers and users to join this public-private partnership, which uses crowdsourcing to collect characterization data on antibodies. Researchers are asked to share validation data from experiments where gene-editing techniques (such as siRNA or CRISPR) have been used to verify antibody binding. The initiative is launched under the aegis of Antibodypedia, a database designed to allow comparisons and scoring of publicly available antibodies towards human protein targets. What is known about an antibody is the foundation of the scoring and ranking system in Antibodypedia.

  • 13.
    Alm, Tove
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    A Chromosome-Centric Analysis of Antibodies Directed toward the Human Proteome Using Antibodypedia2014In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 1669-1676Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies are crucial for the study of human proteins and have been defined as one of the three pillars in the human chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (CHPP). In this article the chromosome-centric structure has been used to analyze the availability of antibodies as judged by the presence within the portal Antibodypedia, a database designed to allow comparisons and scoring of publicly available antibodies toward human protein targets. This public database displays antibody data from more than one million antibodies toward human protein targets. A summary of the content in this knowledge resource reveals that there exist more than 10 antibodies to over 70% of all the putative human genes, evenly distributed over the 24 human chromosomes. The analysis also shows that at present, less than 10% of the putative human protein-coding genes (n = 1882) predicted from the genome sequence lack antibodies, suggesting that focused efforts from the antibody-based and mass spectrometry-based proteomic communities should be encouraged to pursue the analysis of these missing proteins. We show that Antibodypedia may be used to track the development of available and validated antibodies to the individual chromosomes, and thus the database is an attractive tool to identify proteins with no or few antibodies yet generated.

  • 14. Altmann, Simone
    et al.
    Korytar, Tomas
    Kaczmarzyk, Danuta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nipkow, Mareen
    Kuehn, Carsten
    Goldammer, Tom
    Rebl, Alexander
    Toll-like receptors in maraena whitefish: Evolutionary relationship among salmonid fishes and patterns of response to Aeromonas salmonicida2016In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 54, p. 391-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) interact directly with particular pathogenic structures and are thus highly important to innate immunity. The present manuscript characterises a suite of 14 TLR5 in maraena whitefish (Coregonus maraena), a salmonid species with increasing importance for aquaculture. Whitefish TLRs were structurally and evolutionary analysed. The results revealed a close relationship with TLR5 from salmonid fish species rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon. Profiling the baseline expression of TLR genes in whitefish indicated that mainly members of the TLR11 family were highly expressed across all investigated tissues. A stimulation model with inactivated Aeromonas salmonicida was used to induce inflammation in the peritoneal cavity of whitefish. This bacterial challenge induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes and evoked a strong influx of granulated cells of myeloid origin into the peritoneal cavity. As a likely consequence, the abundance of TLR-encoding transcripts increased moderately in peritoneal cells, with the highest levels of transcripts encoding non-mammalian TLR22a and a soluble TLR5 variant. In the course of inflammation, the proportion of granulated cells increased in peripheral blood accompanied by elevated TLR copy numbers in spleen and simultaneously reduced TLR copy numbers in head kidney at day 3 post-stimulation. Altogether, the present study provides in-vivo evidence for relatively modest TLR response patterns, but marked trafficking of myeloid cells as an immunophysiological consequence of A. salmonicida inflammation in whitefish. The present results contribute to improved understanding of the host-pathogen interaction in salmonid fish.

  • 15.
    Amasia, Mary
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Asalapuram, Pavankumar
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Modified DVD-drive as an integrated microfluidic system for precipitate-based detection of LAMP assay2013In: 17th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2013, 2013, Vol. 3, p. 1616-1618Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a sensitive method for nucleic acid analysis, and has been demonstrated as a ideal technique for use in miniaturized microfluidic systems. While LAMP assays are often detected using absorbance or fluorescence, we demonstrate an integrated system for LAMP assays through the detection of precipitate formation using a modified commercial DVD drive. This integrated DVD drive system is able to automate the sedimentation process and scattering-based detection of accumulated precipitate, as well as maintain the constant temperature needed for LAMP analysis.

  • 16. Amit, Ido
    et al.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zhang, Tian
    et al.,
    Voices of biotech2016In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Andersson, Gustav
    et al.
    Wennersten, Christoffer
    Gaber, Alexander
    Boman, Karolina
    Nodin, Björn
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Segersten, Ulrika
    Malmström, Per-Uno
    Jirström, Karin
    Reduced expression of ezrin in urothelial bladder cancer signifies more advanced tumours and an impaired survival: validatory study of two independent patient cohorts2014In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Reduced membranous expression of the cytoskeleton-associated protein ezrin has previously been demonstrated to correlate with tumour progression and poor prognosis in patients with T1G3 urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with non-maintenance Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (n = 92), and the associations with adverse clinicopathological factors have been validated in another, unselected, cohort (n = 104). In the present study, we examined the prognostic significance of ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer in a total number of 442 tumours from two independent patient cohorts. Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of ezrin was evaluated in tissue microarrays with tumours from one retrospective cohort of bladder cancer (n = 110; cohort I) and one population-based cohort (n = 342; cohort II). Classification regression tree analysis was applied for selection of prognostic cutoff. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log rank test and Cox regression proportional hazards' modeling were used to evaluate the impact of ezrin on 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Ezrin expression could be evaluated in tumours from 100 and 342 cases, respectively. In both cohorts, reduced membranous ezrin expression was significantly associated with more advanced T-stage (p < 0.001), high grade tumours (p < 0.001), female sex (p = 0.040 and p = 0.013), and membranous expression of podocalyxin-like protein (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009). Moreover, reduced ezrin expression was associated with a significantly reduced 5-year OS in both cohorts (HR = 3.09 95% CI 1.71-5.58 and HR = 2.15(1.51-3.06), and with DSS in cohort II (HR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.78-4.31). This association also remained significant in adjusted analysis in Cohort I (HR1.99, 95% CI 1.05-3.77) but not in Cohort II. In pTa and pT1 tumours in cohort II, there was no significant association between ezrin expression and time to progression. Conclusions: The results from this study validate previous findings of reduced membranous ezrin expression in urothelial bladder cancer being associated with unfavourable clinicopathological characteristics and an impaired survival. The utility of ezrin as a prognostic biomarker in transurethral resection specimens merits further investigation.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Ken G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Sjöstrand, Nanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Löfblom, John
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Coupled release and site-specific conjugation of Affibody molecules from the surface of E. coli using Sortase AManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Combinatorial protein engineering using libraries displayed on various microorganisms is a powerful method forgeneration of new affinity proteins. Successful efforts often result in broad panels of isolated binders, which are thentypically subcloned, produced, purified and characterized in various assays. Many such assays also require conjugation tofor example reporters or other functional molecules and the downstream production and modification thus tends to be verylaborious and limits the number of candidates that can be screened. Staphylococcal sortase A is a natural transpeptidasethat catalyzes the ligation between a LPXTG motif and N-terminal glycines and is today used in a variety of applicationsfor site-specific conjugation of different molecules to recombinant proteins. We have previously developed a surfacedisplay method for combinatorial protein engineering of Affibody molecules on the outer membrane of E. coli usingautodisplay. Here, we introduced a sortase-A recognition motif into the displayed recombinant proteins and evaluatedsortase-mediated release and specific conjugation of various reporters to Affibody molecules. The approach has potentialto significantly increase the flexibility and throughput of downstream characterization of affinity proteins after directedevolution using cell display and FACS.

  • 19. Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Christer
    Danielsson, Angelika
    Edlund, Karolina
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Asplund, Anna
    The Transcriptomic and Proteomic Landscapes of Bone Marrow and Secondary Lymphoid Tissues2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, p. e115911-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The sequencing of the human genome has opened doors for global gene expression profiling, and the immense amount of data will lay an important ground for future studies of normal and diseased tissues. The Human Protein Atlas project aims to systematically map the human gene and protein expression landscape in a multitude of normal healthy tissues as well as cancers, enabling the characterization of both housekeeping genes and genes that display a tissue-specific expression pattern. This article focuses on identifying and describing genes with an elevated expression in four lymphohematopoietic tissue types (bone marrow, lymph node, spleen and appendix), based on the Human Protein Atlas-strategy that combines high throughput transcriptomics with affinity-based proteomics. Results: An enriched or enhanced expression in one or more of the lymphohematopoietic tissues, compared to other tissue-types, was seen for 693 out of 20,050 genes, and the highest levels of expression were found in bone marrow for neutrophilic and erythrocytic genes. A majority of these genes were found to constitute well-characterized genes with known functions in lymphatic or hematopoietic cells, while others are not previously studied, as exemplified by C19ORF59. Conclusions: In this paper we present a strategy of combining next generation RNA-sequencing with in situ affinity-based proteomics in order to identify and describe new gene targets for further research on lymphatic or hematopoietic cells and tissues. The results constitute lists of genes with enriched or enhanced expression in the four lymphohematopoietic tissues, exemplified also on protein level with immunohistochemical images.

  • 20. Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Sundberg, Marten
    Pristovsek, Nusa
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Natl Res Ctr, Egypt.
    Jonsson, Philip
    Katona, Borbala
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Zieba, Agata
    Ramstrom, Margareta
    Soderberg, Ola
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Houston, USA; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Asplund, Anna
    Insufficient antibody validation challenges oestrogen receptor beta research2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of oestrogen receptor beta (ER beta/ESR2) was a landmark discovery. Its reported expression and homology with breast cancer pharmacological target ER alpha (ESR1) raised hopes for improved endocrine therapies. After 20 years of intense research, this has not materialized. We here perform a rigorous validation of 13 anti-ER beta antibodies, using well-characterized controls and a panel of validation methods. We conclude that only one antibody, the rarely used monoclonal PPZ0506, specifically targets ER beta in immunohistochemistry. Applying this antibody for protein expression profiling in 44 normal and 21 malignant human tissues, we detect ER beta protein in testis, ovary, lymphoid cells, granulosa cell tumours, and a subset of malignant melanoma and thyroid cancers. We do not find evidence of expression in normal or cancerous human breast. This expression pattern aligns well with RNA-seq data, but contradicts a multitude of studies. Our study highlights how inadequately validated antibodies can lead an exciting field astray.

  • 21.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Metabolic engineering strategies to increase n-butanol production from cyanobacteria2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of sustainable replacements for fossil fuels has been spurred by concerns over global warming effects. Biofuels are typically produced through fermentation of edible crops, or forest or agricultural residues requiring cost-intensive pretreatment. An alternative is to use photosynthetic cyanobacteria to directly convert CO2 and sunlight into fuel. In this thesis, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was genetically engineered to produce the biofuel n­-butanol. Several metabolic engineering strategies were explored with the aim to increase butanol titers and tolerance.

    In papers I-II, different driving forces for n-butanol production were evaluated. Expression of a phosphoketolase increased acetyl-CoA levels and subsequently butanol titers. Attempts to increase the NADH pool further improved titers to 100 mg/L in four days.

    In paper III, enzymes were co-localized onto a scaffold to aid intermediate channeling. The scaffold was tested on a farnesene and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) pathway in yeast and in E. coli, respectively, and could be extended to cyanobacteria. Enzyme co-localization increased farnesene titers by 120%. Additionally, fusion of scaffold-recognizing proteins to the enzymes improved farnesene and PHB production by 20% and 300%, respectively, even in the absence of scaffold.

    In paper IV, the gene repression technology CRISPRi was implemented in Synechocystis to enable parallel repression of multiple genes. CRISPRi allowed 50-95% repression of four genes simultaneously. The method will be valuable for repression of competing pathways to butanol synthesis.

    Butanol becomes toxic at high concentrations, impeding growth and thus limiting titers. In papers V-VI, butanol tolerance was increased by overexpressing a heat shock protein or a stress-related sigma factor.

    Taken together, this thesis demonstrates several strategies to improve butanol production from cyanobacteria. The strategies could ultimately be combined to increase titers further.

  • 22.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hallström, Björn
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hudson, Elton Paul
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Using Transcriptomics To Improve Butanol Tolerance of Synechocystis sp Strain PCC 68032013In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 79, no 23, p. 7419-7427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are emerging as promising hosts for production of advanced biofuels such as n-butanol and alkanes. However, cyanobacteria suffer from the same product inhibition problems as those that plague other microbial biofuel hosts. High concentrations of butanol severely reduce growth, and even small amounts can negatively affect metabolic processes. An understanding of how cyanobacteria are affected by their biofuel product can enable identification of engineering strategies for improving their tolerance. Here we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess the transcriptome response of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 to two concentrations of exogenous n-butanol. Approximately 80 transcripts were differentially expressed at 40 mg/liter butanol, and 280 transcripts were different at 1 g/liter butanol. Our results suggest a compromised cell membrane, impaired photosynthetic electron transport, and reduced biosynthesis. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scaled with butanol concentration. Using the physiology and transcriptomics data, we selected several genes for overexpression in an attempt to improve butanol tolerance. We found that overexpression of several proteins, notably, the small heat shock protein HspA, improved tolerance to butanol. Transcriptomics-guided engineering created more solvent-tolerant cyanobacteria strains that could be the foundation for a more productive biofuel host.

  • 23.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Kaczmarzyk, Danuta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Renberg, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nielsen, Jens
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. Tech Univ Denmark.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Genetic and nutrient modulation of acetyl-CoA levels in Synechocystis for n-butanol production2015In: Microbial Cell Factories, ISSN 1475-2859, E-ISSN 1475-2859, Vol. 14, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a strong interest in using photosynthetic cyanobacteria as production hosts for biofuels and chemicals. Recent work has shown the benefit of pathway engineering, enzyme tolerance, and co-factor usage for improving yields of fermentation products. Results: An n-butanol pathway was inserted into a Synechocystis mutant deficient in polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis. We found that nitrogen starvation increased specific butanol productivity up to threefold, but cessation of cell growth limited total n-butanol titers. Metabolite profiling showed that acetyl-CoA increased twofold during nitrogen starvation. Introduction of a phosphoketolase increased acetyl-CoA levels sixfold at nitrogen replete conditions and increased butanol titers from 22 to 37 mg/L at day 8. Flux balance analysis of photoautotrophic metabolism showed that a Calvin-Benson-Bassham-Phosphoketolase pathway had higher theoretical butanol productivity than CBB-Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas and a reduced butanol ATP demand. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that phosphoketolase overexpression and modulation of nitrogen levels are two attractive routes toward increased production of acetyl-CoA derived products in cyanobacteria and could be implemented with complementary metabolic engineering strategies.

  • 24.
    Anfelt, Josefine
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Shabestary, Kiyan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hudson, Elton P.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Complementary effects of ATP, acetyl-CoA and NADH driving forces increase butanol production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Microfluidic bases sample preparation for blood stream infections2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfluidics promises to re-shape the current health-care system by transferring diagnostic tools from central laboratories to close vicinity of the patient (point-of-care). One of the most important operational steps in any diagnostic platform is sample preparation, which is the main subject in this thesis. The goal of sample preparation is to isolate targets of interest from their surroundings. The work in this thesis is based on three ways to isolate bacteria:  immune-based isolation, selective cell lysis, size-based separation.

    The first sample-preparation approach uses antibodies against lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which are surface molecules found on all gram-negative bacteria. There are two characteristics that make this surface molecule interesting. First, it is highly abundant: one bacterium has approximately a million LPS molecules on its cell-wall. Second, the molecule has a conserved region within all gram-negative bacteria, so using one affinity molecule to isolate disease-causing gram-negative bacteria is an attractive option, particularly from the point of view of sample preparation. The main challenge, however, is antigen accessibility. To address this, we have developed a treatment protocol that improves the capturing efficiency.

    The strategy behind selective cell lysis takes advantage of the differences between the blood-cell membrane and the bacterial cell-wall. These fundamental differences make it possible to lyse (destroy) blood-cells selectively while keeping the target of interest, here the bacteria, intact and, what is more important alive. Viability plays an important role in determining antibiotic susceptibility.

    Difference in size is another well-used characteristic for sample- separation. Inertial microfluidics can focus size-dependent particle at high flow-rates. Thus, particles of 10 µm diameter were positioned in precise streamlines within a curved channel.  The focused particles can then be collected at defined outlets.  This approach was then used to isolate white blood cells, which account for approximately 1% of the whole blood.  In such a device particles of 2µm diameter (size of bacteria) would not be focused and thereby present at every outlet. To separate bacteria from blood elasto-inertial microfluidics was used. Here, e blood components are diverted to center of the channels while smaller bacteria remain in the side streams and can subsequently be separated.

  • 26.
    Ardabili, Sahar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Epitope unmasking for improved immuno-magnetic isolation of Gram-negative bacteriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27. Arner, P.
    et al.
    Henjes, Frauke
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Darmanis, Spyros N.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Dahlman, I.
    Iresjö, B. -M
    Naredi, P.
    Agustsson, T.
    Lundholm, K.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rydén, M.
    Circulating Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 associates with weight loss and poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e0123566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer cachexia (CC) is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia. Design/Subjects: Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32) or without (n = 27) cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins) from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer. Results: Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1) was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008). In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results. Conclusions: In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC.

  • 28. Ashokkumar, M.
    et al.
    Aralaguppe, S. G.
    Tripathy, S. P.
    Hanna, L. E.
    Neogi, Ujjwal
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Lab Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unique phenotypic characteristics of recently transmitted HIV-1 subtype C envelope glycoprotein gp120: Use of CXCR6 coreceptor by transmitted founder viruses2018In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 92, no 9, article id e00063-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adequate information on the precise molecular and biological composition of the viral strains that establish HIV infection in the human host will provide effective means of immunization against HIV infection. In an attempt to identify the transmitted founder (TF) virus and differentiate the biological properties and infectious potential of the TF virus from those of the population of the early transmitted viruses, 250 patient-derived gp120 envelope glycoproteins were cloned in pMN-K7- Luc-IRESs-NefΔgp120 to obtain chimeric viruses. Samples were obtained from eight infants who had recently become infected with HIV through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) and two adults who acquired infection through the heterosexual route and were in the chronic stage of infection. Among the 250 clones tested, 65 chimeric viruses were infectious, and all belonged to HIV-1 subtype C. The 65 clones were analyzed for molecular features of the envelope, per-infectious-particle infectivity, coreceptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and sensitivity to broadly neutralizing antibodies. Based on genotypic and phenotypic analysis of the viral clones, we identified 10 TF viruses from the eight infants. The TF viruses were characterized by shorter V1V2 regions, a reduced number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and a higher infectivity titer compared to the virus variants from the adults in the chronic stage of infection. CXCR6 coreceptor usage, in addition to that of the CCR5 coreceptor, which was used by all 65 chimeric viruses, was identified in 13 viruses. The sensitivity of the TF variants to maraviroc and a standard panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, PG09, PG16, and PGT121) was found to be much lower than that of the virus variants from the adults in the chronic stage of infection.

  • 29.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity Arrays for Profiling Proteins and Autoantibody Repertoires2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mezger, Anja
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1251-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond.

  • 31.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmüller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 918-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 32.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody profiling in multiple sclerosis using arrays of human protein fragments2013In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 2657-2672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire with large antigen collections is emerging as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for autoimmune diseases. Here, a systematic and undirected approach was taken to screen for profiles of IgG in human plasma from 90 individuals with multiple sclerosis related diagnoses. Reactivity pattern of 11,520 protein fragments (representing ̃38% of all human protein encoding genes) were generated on planar protein microarrays built within the Human Protein Atlas. For more than 2,000 antigens IgG reactivity was observed, among which 64% were found only in single individuals. We used reactivity distributions among multiple sclerosis subgroups to select 384 antigens, which were then reevaluated on planar microarrays, corroborated with suspension bead arrays in a larger cohort (n = 376) and confirmed for specificity in inhibition assays. Among the heterogeneous pattern within and across multiple sclerosis subtypes, differences in recognition frequencies were found for 51 antigens, which were enriched for proteins of transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, using protein fragments and complementary high-throughput protein array platforms facilitated an alternative route to discovery and verification of potentially disease-associated autoimmunity signatures, that are now proposed as additional antigens for large-scale validation studies across multiple sclerosis biobanks.

  • 33.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis2016In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 22, p. 10-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mitsios, N.
    Khademi, M.
    Alfredsson, L.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mulder, J.
    Olsson, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Anoctamin 2, a novel autoimmune target candidate in multiple sclerosis2014In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 20, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mitsios, Nicholas
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Khademi, Mohsen
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjoberg, Ronald
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Forsstrom, Bjorn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bredenberg, Johan
    Bomfim, Izaura Lima
    Holmgren, Erik
    Gronlund, Hans
    Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb
    Abdelmagid, Nada
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Waterboer, Tim
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Mulder, Jan
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Peter
    Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis2016In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 8, p. 2188-2193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and also is regarded as an autoimmune condition. However, the antigenic targets of the autoimmune response in MS have not yet been deciphered. In an effort to mine the autoantibody repertoire within MS, we profiled 2,169 plasma samples from MS cases and population-based controls using bead arrays built with 384 human protein fragments selected from an initial screening with 11,520 antigens. Our data revealed prominently increased autoantibody reactivity against the chloride-channel protein anoctamin 2 (ANO2) in MS cases compared with controls. This finding was corroborated in independent assays with alternative protein constructs and by epitope mapping with peptides covering the identified region of ANO2. Additionally, we found a strong interaction between the presence of ANO2 autoantibodies and the HLA complex MS-associated DRB1*15 allele, reinforcing a potential role for ANO2 autoreactivity in MS etiopathogenesis. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis in human MS brain tissue showed ANO2 expression as small cellular aggregates near and inside MS lesions. Thus this study represents one of the largest efforts to characterize the autoantibody repertoire within MS. The findings presented here demonstrate that an ANO2 autoimmune subphenotype may exist in MS and lay the groundwork for further studies focusing on the pathogenic role of ANO2 autoantibodies in MS.

  • 36.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Antigen arrays for profiling autoantibody repertoires2016In: Bioanalysis, ISSN 1757-6180, E-ISSN 1757-6199, Vol. 8, no 10, p. 1105-1126Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoantibodies are a key component for the diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. In order to discover novel autoantibody targets, highly multiplexed assays based on antigen arrays hold a great potential and provide possibilities to analyze hundreds of body fluid samples for their reactivity pattern against thousands of antigens in parallel. Here, we provide an overview of the available technologies for producing antigen arrays, highlight some of the technical and methodological considerations and discuss their applications as discovery tools. Together with recent studies utilizing antigen arrays, we give an overview on how the different types of antigen arrays have and will continue to deliver novel insights into autoimmune diseases among several others.

  • 37.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    et al.,
    The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamine 2 as an autoimmune component of multiple sclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Szarka, Eszter
    Huber, Krisztina
    Orosz, Anita
    Babos, Fruzsina
    Magyar, Anna
    Hudecz, Ferenc
    Rojkovich, Bernadette
    Gati, Tamas
    Nagy, Gyoergy
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    Sarmay, Gabriella
    Prechl, Jozsef
    Nilsson, Peter
    Papp, Krisztian
    Bead Arrays for Antibody and Complement Profiling Reveal Joint Contribution of Antibody Isotypes to C3 Deposition2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e96403-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of antigen arrays has provided researchers with great tools to identify reactivities against self or foreign antigens from body fluids. Yet, these approaches mostly do not address antibody isotypes and their effector functions even though these are key points for a more detailed understanding of disease processes. Here, we present a bead array-based assay for a multiplexed determination of antigen-specific antibody levels in parallel with their properties for complement activation. We measured the deposition of C3 fragments from serum samples to reflect the degree of complement activation via all three complement activation pathways. We utilized the assay on a bead array containing native and citrullinated peptide antigens to investigate the levels of IgG, IgM and IgA autoantibodies along with their complement activating properties in serum samples of 41 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 40 controls. Our analysis revealed significantly higher IgG reactivity against the citrullinated fibrinogen beta and filaggrin peptides as well as an IgA reactivity that was exclusive for citrullinated fibrinogen b peptide and C3 deposition in rheumatoid arthritis patients. In addition, we characterized the humoral immune response against the viral EBNA-1 antigen to demonstrate the applicability of this assay beyond autoimmune conditions. We observed that particular buffer compositions were demanded for separate measurement of antibody reactivity and complement activation, as detection of antigen-antibody complexes appeared to be masked due to C3 deposition. We also found that rheumatoid factors of IgM isotype altered C3 deposition and introduced false-positive reactivities against EBNA-1 antigen. In conclusion, the presented bead-based assay setup can be utilized to profile antibody reactivities and immune-complex induced complement activation in a high-throughput manner and could facilitate the understanding and diagnosis of several diseases where complement activation plays role in the pathomechanism.

  • 39.
    Bachmann, Julie
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Burte, Florence
    Pramana, Setia
    Conte, Ianina
    Brown, Biobele J.
    Orimadegun, Adebola E.
    Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A.
    Afolabi, Nathaniel K.
    Akinkunmi, Francis
    Omokhodion, Samuel
    Akinbami, Felix O.
    Shokunbi, Wuraola A.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sodeinde, Olugbemiro
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria2014In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 10, no 4, p. e1004038-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria.

  • 40.
    Bai, Yunpeng
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weibull, Emilie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Interfacing picoliter droplet microfluidics with addressable microliter compartments using fluorescence activated cell sorting2014In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 194, p. 249-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Droplet microfluidic platforms have, while enabling high-throughput manipulations and the assaying of single cell scale compartments, been lacking interfacing to allow macro scale access to the output from droplet microfluidic operations. Here, we present a simple and high-throughput method for individually directing cell containing droplets to an addressable and macro scale accessible microwell slide for downstream analysis. Picoliter aqueous droplets containing low gelling point agarose and eGFP expressing Escherichia coli (E. coli) are created in a microfluidic device, solidified to agarose beads and transferred into an aqueous buffer. A Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) is used to sort agarose beads containing cells into microwells in which the growth and expansion of cell colonies is monitored. We demonstrate fast sorting and high accuracy positioning of sorted 15 μm gelled droplet agarose beads into microwells (14 × 48) on a 25 mm × 75 mm microscope slide format using a FACS with a 100 μm nozzle and an xy-stage. The interfacing method presented here enables the products of high-throughput or single cell scale droplet microfluidics assays to be output to a wide range of microtiter plate formats familiar to biological researchers lowering the barriers for utilization of these microfluidic platforms.

  • 41.
    Banerjee, I.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Zelenin, Sergey
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform2015In: MicroTAS 2015 - 19th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society , 2015, p. 1256-1258Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present "SlipDisc", a versatile sample preparation platform based on slipchip1 technology. The SlipDisc platform uses polycarbonate CDs and laser cut PSA instead of glass and a hand-winded mechanical clock mechanism to precisely manipulate minute amount of liquid. The innovative hand-winded mechanical "clockwork" that enables sample processing from one spot to another with defined precision. As a prof of principle of bioassay, we show HRP enzyme reacting with TMB substrate and a multilayer architecture used in manipulation of magnetic beads through an immiscible oil phase. Our long-term goal is to develop a sample-in-result-out multi-parametric bioanalytical SlipDisc platform specifically designed to need the needs at resource-limited settings for point of care molecular diagnostics.

  • 42.
    Banerjee, Indradumna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Salih, Tagrid
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Ramachandraiah, Harisha
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Chemistry.
    Araújo, A. C.
    Karlsson, M.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Slipdisc: A versatile sample preparation platform for point of care diagnostics2017In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, no 56, p. 35048-35054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a microfluidic sample preparation platform called "Slipdisc" based on slipchip technology. Slipdisc is a rotational slipchip that uses a unique hand-wound clockwork mechanism for precise movement of specially fabricated polycarbonate discs. In operation, the microchannels and microchambers carved on the closely aligned microfluidic discs convert from continuous filled paths to defined compartments using the slip movement. The clockwork mechanism introduced here is characterised by a food dye experiment and a conventional HRP TMB reaction before measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme levels, which is a crucial biomarker for neonatal diagnostics. The colorimetry based detection of LDH was performed with an unmodified camera and an image analysis procedure based on normalising images and observing changes in red channel intensity. The analysis showed a close to unity coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.96) in detecting the LDH concentration when compared with a standard Chemical Analyser, demonstrating the excellent performance of the slipdisc platform with colorimetric detection. The versatile point of care sample preparation platform should ideally be suited for a multitude of applications at resource-limited settings.

  • 43. Bengtsson, Erik
    et al.
    Nerjovaj, Pashtrik
    Wangefjord, Sakarias
    Nodin, Björn
    Eberhard, Jakob
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Borgquist, Signe
    Jirström, Karin
    HMG-CoA reductase expression in primary colorectal cancer correlates with favourable clinicopathological characteristics and an improved clinical outcome2014In: Diagnostic Pathology, ISSN 1746-1596, E-ISSN 1746-1596, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 78-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An association between tumor-specific HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) expression and good prognosis has previously been demonstrated in breast and ovarian cancer. In this study, the expression, clinicopathological correlates and prognostic value of HMGCR expression in colorectal cancer was examined. Findings: Immunohistochemical expression of HMGCR was assessed in tissue microarrays with primary tumours from 557 incident cases of colorectal cancer in the Malmo Diet and Cancer Study. Pearson's Chi Square test was applied to explore the associations between HMGCR expression and clinicopathological factors and other investigative biomarkers. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess the relationship between HMGCR expression and cancer-specific survival (CSS) according to negative vs positive HMGCR expression. A total number of 535 (96.0%) tumours were suitable for analysis, of which 61 (11.4%) were HMGCR negative. Positive cytoplasmic HMGCR expression was associated with distant metastasis-free disease at diagnosis (p = 0.002), lack of vascular invasion (p = 0.043), microsatellite-instability (p = 0.033), expression of cyclin D1 (p = <0.001) and p21 (p = <0.001). Positive HMGCR expression was significantly associated with a prolonged CSS in unadjusted Cox regression analysis in the entire cohort (HR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.20-2.66) and in Stage III-IV disease (HR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.09-2.68), but not after adjustment for established clinicopathological parameters. Conclusions: Findings from this prospective cohort study demonstrate that HMGCR is differentially expressed in colorectal cancer and that positive expression is associated with favourable tumour characteristics and a prolonged survival in unadjusted analysis. The utility of HMGCR as a predictor of response to neoadjuvant or adjuvant statin treatment in colorectal cancer merits further study. Virtual slides: The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2115647072103464.

  • 44.
    Berg, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Hedrum, A
    Holmberg, A
    Pontén, F
    Uhlén, M
    Lundeberg, J
    Direct solid-phase sequence analysis of the human p53 gene by use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction and alpha-thiotriphosphate nucleotides.1995In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 1461-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the candidate cancer-prognostic genes is the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which, when mutated, plays an important role in the development of many types of cancers. To facilitate robust large-scale DNA analysis of microdissected tumor biopsies, we describe a multiplex/nested PCR approach for a simultaneous outer amplification of exons 4-9 of the human p53 gene with parallel amplification of the HLA-DQB1 locus, involving a total of 14 primers. This approach reduces the required number of cells for analysis and avoids any variation in the amplifications of the individual p53 exons during the common outer amplification step. The HLA sequencing allows sample identification because the DQB1 locus is highly polymorphic and is thereby patient-specific. The p53 and HLA amplicons are analyzed by solid-phase sequencing in a semiautomated format. To improve the DNA sequence quality, we used 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5'-O-1-thiotriphosphates in the sequencing reactions.

  • 45. Berger, Ashton C
    et al.
    Korkut, Anil
    Kanchi, Rupa S
    Hegde, Apurva M
    Lenoir, Walter
    Liu, Wenbin
    Liu, Yuexin
    Fan, Huihui
    Shen, Hui
    Ravikumar, Visweswaran
    Rao, Arvind
    Schultz, Andre
    Li, Xubin
    Sumazin, Pavel
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Cellular and Clinical Proteomics.
    Mestdagh, Pieter
    Gunaratne, Preethi H
    Yau, Christina
    Bowlby, Reanne
    Robertson, A Gordon
    Tiezzi, Daniel G
    Wang, Chen
    Cherniack, Andrew D
    Godwin, Andrew K
    Kuderer, Nicole M
    Rader, Janet S
    Zuna, Rosemary E
    Sood, Anil K
    Lazar, Alexander J
    Ojesina, Akinyemi I
    Adebamowo, Clement
    Adebamowo, Sally N
    Baggerly, Keith A
    Chen, Ting-Wen
    Chiu, Hua-Sheng
    Lefever, Steve
    Liu, Liang
    MacKenzie, Karen
    Orsulic, Sandra
    Roszik, Jason
    Shelley, Carl Simon
    Song, Qianqian
    Vellano, Christopher P
    Wentzensen, Nicolas
    Weinstein, John N
    Mills, Gordon B
    Levine, Douglas A
    Akbani, Rehan
    A Comprehensive Pan-Cancer Molecular Study of Gynecologic and Breast Cancers.2018In: Cancer Cell, ISSN 1535-6108, E-ISSN 1878-3686, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 690-705.e9, article id S1535-6108(18)30119-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed molecular data on 2,579 tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) of four gynecological types plus breast. Our aims were to identify shared and unique molecular features, clinically significant subtypes, and potential therapeutic targets. We found 61 somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) and 46 significantly mutated genes (SMGs). Eleven SCNAs and 11 SMGs had not been identified in previous TCGA studies of the individual tumor types. We found functionally significant estrogen receptor-regulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and gene/lncRNA interaction networks. Pathway analysis identified subtypes with high leukocyte infiltration, raising potential implications for immunotherapy. Using 16 key molecular features, we identified five prognostic subtypes and developed a decision tree that classified patients into the subtypes based on just six features that are assessable in clinical laboratories.

  • 46.
    Bergman, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Botling, Johan
    Uppsala University.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    M Hallström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Djureinovic, Dijana
    Uppsala University.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University.
    Mathias, Uhlén
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    The human adrenal gland proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.2017In: Endocrinology, ISSN 0013-7227, E-ISSN 1945-7170, Vol. 158, no 2, p. 239-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adrenal gland is a composite endocrine organ with vital functions that include the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. To define the molecular landscape that underlies the specific functions of the adrenal gland, we combined a genome-wide transcriptomics approach using messenger RNA sequencing of human tissues with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling on tissue microarrays. Approximately two-thirds of all putative protein coding genes were expressed in the adrenal gland, and the analysis identified 253 genes with an elevated pattern of expression in the adrenal gland, with only 37 genes showing a markedly greater expression level (more than fivefold) in the adrenal gland compared with 31 other normal human tissue types analyzed. The analyses allowed for an assessment of the relative expression levels for well-known proteins involved in adrenal gland function but also identified previously poorly characterized proteins in the adrenal cortex, such as the FERM (4.1 protein, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain containing 5 and the nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV) protein homolog. We have provided a global analysis of the adrenal gland transcriptome and proteome, with a comprehensive list of genes with elevated expression in the adrenal gland and spatial information with examples of protein expression patterns for corresponding proteins. These genes and proteins constitute important starting points for an improved understanding of the normal function and pathophysiology of the adrenal glands.

  • 47. Berntsson, Jonna
    et al.
    Lundgren, Sebastian
    Nodin, Björn
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gaber, Alexander
    Jirström, Karin
    Expression and prognostic significance of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor in epithelial ovarian cancer2014In: Journal of Ovarian Research, ISSN 1757-2215, E-ISSN 1757-2215, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 26-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: High expression of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (PIGR) has previously been associated with a favourable prognosis in a few cancer forms, but its expression and relationship with clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic significance of PIGR expression in EOC. Methods: After an initial screening in the Human Protein Atlas portal, a validated antibody was selected for extended analysis of immunohistochemical PIGR expression in tissue microarrays with tumours from 154 incident cases of EOC from two pooled prospective population-based cohorts. Subsets of corresponding benign-appearing fallopian tubes (n = 38) and omental metastases (n = 33) were also analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were applied to examine the impact of PIGR expression on overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer-specific survival (OCSS). Results: PIGR expression was significantly higher in fallopian tubes compared to primary tumours and metastases (p < 0.001) and lower in carcinoma of the serous subtype compared to other carcinomas (p < 0.001). PIGR expression was significantly associated with lower grade (p = 0.001), mucinous histological subtype (p = 0.002), positive progesterone receptor expression (p = 0.009) and negative or low Ki-67 expression (p = 0.003). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significantly improved OS (p = 0.013) and OCSS (p = 0.009) for patients with tumours displaying high expression of PIGR. These associations were confirmed in unadjusted Cox regression analysis (HR = 0.48; 95% CI 0.26-0.87; p = 0.015 for OS and HR = 0.43, 95% CI 0.22-0.82; p = 0.011 for OCSS) but did not remain significant after adjustment for age, grade and clinical stage. Conclusions: This study provides a first demonstration of PIGR expression in human fallopian tubes, primary EOC tumours and metastases. High tumour-specific expression of PIGR was found to be associated with a favourable prognosis in unadjusted, but not in adjusted, analysis. These findings are novel and merit further investigation.

  • 48. Bidon, Tobias
    et al.
    Janke, Axel
    Fain, Steven R.
    Eiken, Hans Geir
    Hagen, Snorre B.
    Saarma, Urmas
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lecomte, Nicolas
    Hailer, Frank
    Brown and Polar Bear Y Chromosomes Reveal Extensive Male-Biased Gene Flow within Brother Lineages2014In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 1353-1363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brown and polar bears have become prominent examples in phylogeography, but previous phylogeographic studies relied largely on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or were geographically restricted. The male-specific Y chromosome, a natural counterpart to mtDNA, has remained underexplored. Although this paternally inherited chromosome is indispensable for comprehensive analyses of phylogeographic patterns, technical difficulties and low variability have hampered its application in most mammals. We developed 13 novel Y-chromosomal sequence and microsatellite markers from the polar bear genome and screened these in a broad geographic sample of 130 brown and polar bears. We also analyzed a 390-kb-long Y-chromosomal scaffold using sequencing data from published male ursine genomes. Y chromosome evidence support the emerging understanding that brown and polar bears started to diverge no later than the Middle Pleistocene. Contrary to mtDNA patterns, we found 1) brown and polar bears to be reciprocally monophyletic sister (or rather brother) lineages, without signals of introgression, 2) male-biased gene flow across continents and on phylogeographic time scales, and 3) male dispersal that links the Alaskan ABC islands population to mainland brown bears. Due to female philopatry, mtDNA provides a highly structured estimate of population differentiation, while male-biased gene flow is a homogenizing force for nuclear genetic variation. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing both maternally and paternally inherited loci for a comprehensive view of phylogeographic history, and that mtDNA-based phylogeographic studies of many mammals should be reevaluated. Recent advances in sequencing technology render the analysis of Y-chromosomal variation feasible, even in nonmodel organisms.

  • 49.
    Birgersson, Elin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bead-based and multiplexed immunoassays for protein profiling via sequential affinity capture2017In: Serum/Plasma Proteomics, Humana Press, 2017, p. 45-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays offer high-throughput immunoassays for multiplexed analyses of clinical samples. For such approaches, samples are either labeled in solution to enable a direct readout on the single binder assay format or detected by matched pairs of capture and detection antibodies in dual binder assay format, also known as sandwich assays. Aiming to benefit from the flexibility and capacity offered by single binder assay readout and the specificity and sensitivity of dual binder assays, we developed a multiplexed dual binder procedure that is based on a sequential, rather than combined, antigen binding. The method, entitled dual capture assay (DCA), is composed of an initial antigen capture by antibodies on beads, followed by labeling of captured protein targets on beads, combinatorial elution steps at high and low pH, and a readout using a secondary bead array. Compared to classical single binder assays, the described method demonstrated several advantages such as reduced contribution of off-target binding, lower noise levels, and improved correlation when comparing with clinical reference values. This procedure describes a novel and versatile immunoassay strategy for proteome profiling in body fluids.

  • 50. Birse, Kenzie D.
    et al.
    Romas, Laura M.
    Guthrie, Brandon L.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bosire, Rose
    Kiarie, James
    Farquhar, Carey
    Broliden, Kristina
    Burgener, Adam D.
    Genital Injury Signatures and Microbiome Alterations Associated With Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Usage and Intravaginal Drying Practices2017In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 215, no 4, p. 590-598Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Increasing evidence suggests depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and intravaginal practices may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection risk; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. This study evaluated the effect of DMPA and intravaginal practices on the genital proteome and microbiome to gain mechanistic insights. Methods. Cervicovaginal secretions from 86 Kenyan women, including self-reported DMPA users (n = 23), nonhormonal contraceptive users (n = 63), and women who practice vaginal drying (n = 46), were analyzed using tandem-mass spectrometry. Results. We identified 473 human and 486 bacterial proteins from 18 different genera. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate use associated with increased hemoglobin and immune activation (HBD, HBB, IL36G), and decreased epithelial repair proteins (TFF3, F11R). Vaginal drying associated with increased hemoglobin and decreased phagocytosis factors (AZU1, MYH9, PLAUR). Injury signatures were exacerbated in DMPA users who also practiced vaginal drying. More diverse (H index: 0.71 vs 0.45; P =.009) bacterial communities containing Gardnerella vaginalis associated with vaginal drying, whereas DMPA showed no significant association with community composition or diversity. Conclusions. These findings provide new insights into the impact of DMPA and vaginal drying on mucosal barriers. Future investigations are needed to confirm their relationship with HIV risk in women.

1234567 1 - 50 of 434
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf