Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 1454
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abaid, Mohammed
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Evaluation of Jatropha Curcas as future en-ergy crop in some African countries.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Biofuels now days consider as one of the successful alternative to meet the challenges associated with climate change and peak oil, as well as a way for poorer countries to develop an industry in order to enhance social and economic development. In many developing countries and particularly in Africa, this has led to large-scale investments in lands by foreign companies, and as a consequence there has been a debate on whether these actions are environmentally sustainable and whether this kind of activity actually brings economic development. The investments of biofuels in Africa, espe-cially the Jatropha plantations are debatable. Several arguments have been concentrat-ed on development goals, economic issues and environmental concerns. This report evaluates the status of some Jatropha projects in Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanza-nia, the outcomes of the report show that biofuels from Jatropha lead to a significant socio -economic benefits by creating many jobs opportunities and improve the stand-ard of living in Africa. However, inadequate funding’s, high investment costs, no clear policies for biodiesel are the most challenging for Jatropha in Africa which need fur-ther mechanisms and ideology by African scientists, leaders, NGOs, farmers and deci-sion makers. In the studied countries, it was reported that the Jatropha produce low yields of oil seeds especially in the marginal lands with no enough water supplies. In Kenya the productivity of Jatropha is very low for large scale- project. Moreover some social and environmental impacts are also seen for Jatropha cultivations in Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. Some Jatropha projects have impacted the food security nega-tively; nevertheless some biofuels experts believe that Jatropha has no any adverse im-pacts on food security since it is inedible and grown on marginal lands. In Ethiopia, the main environmental impacts of Jatropha are related to biodiversity, water quality and quantity. In Kenya, the environmental impacts are related to biodiversity, carbon emissions, water withdrawal, pollution of agro- chemicals usage, deforestation and soil erosion, whereas in Tanzania, the main environmental issues are connected to the change of land use system, impacts on biodiversity and impacts on water resources.

  • 2.
    Abraham, Jonatan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Strand, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Reseavdrag: En analys av ett arbetsmarknadspolitiskt styrmedel ur ett hållbarhetsperspektiv2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to make tax deductions on travel expenses have been present in Sweden since the late 1920s. The main purpose of the state subsidy has been to improve the mobility in the label market. However, in recent years there has been a heated debate as to if the subsidy is truly socio-economically sustainable or not. The favoritism of car users has also made the matter a question of ecological sustainability.

    The aim of this essay is to analyse and provide general knowledge of the swedish system of deductible travel expenses. The text is divided into four major parts:

    • A litterature review presenting the history of the subsidy, previous research, and the current political debate.
    • A questionnaire survey where the general public’s opinion of tax-deductible travel expenses is examined. 
    • A discussion of possible adjustments of the different parameters of the system, where the most optimal ammendment is chosen
    • An analysis of 3 different scenarios; keeping the current system, using the ammended system obtained in the calibration, and removing the system.

    From the results we could conclude that an ammended system would be noticeably more socio-economically viable and ecologically sustainable, compared with the current system. However, a complete removal of the system would be the most optimal. In addition, the questionnaire surveys results shows that the public is mostly positive to travel deductions. However, it was apparent that the views of many could shift completely, when presenting facts.

  • 3. Abu-Khader, M. M.
    et al.
    Shawaqfeh, A. T.
    Naddaf, Z.
    Maity, J. P.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Radon in the groundwater in the Amman-Zarqa Basin and related environments in Jordan2018In: Groundwater for Sustainable Development, ISSN 2352-801X, Vol. 7, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of radon (222Rn) in environment (groundwater and indoor air) from geogenic sources is receiving an growing attention due to its adverse impact on human health worldwide including Jordan. Highlighting the current status of radon in Jordan, the present study of radon concentrations in ground waters in the Amman-Zarqa basin (AZB) was investigated. Groundwater samples were collected from fifteen wells located in three main areas of Ras Al-Ain, Al-Rsaifeh and Al-Hashemite. Radon concentration was measure using Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) Tri- Carb 3110 with discriminator and the highest values for radon concentration in water were observed in Al-Rsaifeh area and ranged from 4.52 up to 30.70 Bq/l with an average of 11.22 Bq/l, which were attributed to the decay of naturally distributed uranium in phosphate rock from Al-Rsaifeh mines. In Ras Al-Ain area, the radon concentration were noted ranged from 0.6 to 5.55 Bq/l with an average of 2.82 Bq/l, and also in Al-Hashemite area were ranged from 0.77 to 5.37 Bq/l with an average of 4.04 Bq/l. The overall average concentration of tested samples was 5.77 Bq/l and found within the acceptable international levels. Ground water samples of Ras Al-Ain area showed good quality as was tested of low salinity. It recorded the lowest average radon concentration of 2.82 Bq/l. Also, Radon indoor and building materials was reviewed. In conclusion, this study presented an urged need for developing national regulations and standards as well as awareness program concerning the radon status in Jordan.Elsevier B.V.

  • 4.
    Acheampong, Isaac
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Urban biodiversity; a global perspective.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A majority of the world’s cities are situated in or near areas of high biodiversity. Rise in global urban population resulting in rapid urban expansions (larger cities) is a threat to urban biodiversity, which has implications for the ecological health and general well being of humans. The study exploits consistent global land use data to compare 102 cities across the globe on a measure of urban biodiversity, within 15 km and 30 km from the approximate centres of the cities. Cities with high population and higher percentage of land use dedicated to artificial infrastructure recorded lower percentage size reserved for natural habitat, and vice versa. Further testing in regression analysis with birds and plants species as response variables shows a relation with urban extent and size of natural habitat which seeks to promote sustaining ecosystems services. Since urban biodiversity has implications for human ecological health, its indicators must be constantly measured and monitored, while adhering to best practices that conserve nature.

  • 5.
    Ackebo, Jonas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Brandt, Anna-Clara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Dobraja, Kristine
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Isaksson, Sarah
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Liebmann, Andrew
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lindberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Lundgren, Monia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Song, Meng
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Svenfelt, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Zachrisson, Maja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    What is the potential to create a just social-ecological in Fisksätra/Saltsjöbaden?: Report from the Ecosystem support and Environmental Justice course (AG2803)2013Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Agarwal, Tushar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The Ganges drainage basin: Hydrological transitions due to anthropogenic water use.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrological changes in catchments world over have affected regional climate and pose serious challenge to future water resource management. The Ganges drainage basin (GDB) is one such region which has undergone rapid transformation in land and water use, more specifically in the latter half of 20th century. GDB has a population of more than half a billion people and is spread across India, China (Tibet), Nepal and Bangladesh. Further, hydrological investigations accounting land and water use changes in GDB are rare. This study is an attempt to resolve hydrological changes in the Ganges basin using the fundamental water balance, focusing particularly on water use changes through irrigation. Between the period 1951-1959 and 1991- 2000, precipitation (P) in the Ganges basin has reduced by 11.25 % while evapotranspiration (ET) has only reduced by 3.61 %. In addition, the ET/P has increased from 0.483 to 0.525 during the same period suggesting a larger partitioning of P towards ET. This suggests greater utilization of P to release water vapor in the atmosphere and thus causing a reduced water flow downstream. With water availability at the fulcrum of future concern for regional and national water security, these findings should encourage policy makers to account for hydrological changes in the GDB in planning sustainable water use.

  • 7.
    Agnarsson, Madelene
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Larsson, Marie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hjälpmedel vid beräkning av grundvattensänkning för att underlätta prissättning i anbudsfas.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Grundvattensänkningar är något som ofta behöver utföras innan konstruktion av anläggningar i jord. Att sätta pris på en grundvattensänkning är inte särskilt lätt när information eller kompetenser saknas som krävs för att göra en rimlig bedömning. Veidekke Entreprenad Anläggning Öst är ett anläggningsföretag som oftast jobbar i generalentreprenadsform. Vid en generalentreprenad så är projekteringen redan gjord och pris ska sättas på de olika posterna som behöver utföras.

    Denna rapport presenterar en förenklad process för kalkylberäkningar i anbudsfas. Därför har en mall har tagits fram åt Veidekke. Denna mall består av fyra representativa typjordar och ekvationer som gör den användarvänlig. För att kontrollera mallens duglighet så testades den sedan på tre projekt som Veidekke utfört grundvattensänkningar på. Mallens beräknade resultat kunde då jämföras med observerade resultat. Det visade sig att mallen ger en god approximation på hur grundvattensänkningen kan se ut och en fingervisning på hur lång tid det kan ta innan stationär grundvattensänkning uppkommer.

  • 8.
    Ahlberg, Fanny
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Ivansen, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Analys över variationer i vattenförbrukning och dess påverkandefaktorer: En fallstudie över områden i Borås2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The steady supply of fresh water is, and has always been, one of the most important functions in human societies. Different users have been able to take advantage of this resource in different extents and for different purposes. The major areas for water usage are drinking water, water supply for industrial purposes and the usage in agricultural sector.

    By dimensioning the supply- and sewer systems accordingly to the demand of the users a more sustainable and optimal system can be achieved. A proper dimensioning has six general factors it should to take in consideration. These are the size of the population, water consumption in residents, general water consumption in schools and offices, water consumption in industry, leakage and different water losses. With a background of these factors this reports main focus and purpose is analysing the variation in water consumption for different consumers (such as residential houses or apartment blocks) in different time intervals (in this report during days and years) and in respect to different factors. The factors that has been chosen to be examined is how water consumption depends on mean age of the consumers and the outdoor temperature. To complete this study water consumption data of different areas in Borås has been provided from the Swedish consultant firm Tyréns. Before analysing the data another study was made by Victor Eliasson, which included the revealing of different faults in the provided data. As a result of this study the most reliable data was chosen to further analysis with respect to the chosen aspects. During the project the calculation- and modelling program Matlab was used alongside the chart program excel. These two programs combined made it possible to handle large amounts of data and present it in different graphs and models. Conclusions could later be made by analyses and different statistical methods. The result from the comparison between areas with different mean ages of the residents showed that the area with high mean age (80 years) hade a higher water consumption than the other areas. The variation in water consumption differed as well between the area with the high mean age compared to the other areas. A regression- and correlation analysis between water consumption and temperature was performed to see if water consumption is depending on the outdoor temperature. The function of a regression analysis is to describe the relation between different parameters with a mathematic model (in this study a linear model). A correlation analysis is then performed to tell how well the mathematic model describes the relation. A conclusion could be made that the water consumption tends to increase with increasing temperature during parts of the year, since a correlation could be found during mars to September. The strongest correlation was in general during May and July for all the areas. No conclusion of how the variation i water consumption depends on different consumers could be made for the analysis during a day and a year. In contrast to the parameters that had a correlation with water consumption there was no visible connection between water consumption over a year or day depending on different users. 

  • 9.
    Ahlfors, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Bergkrantz, Malin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Energieffektivisering av en bandybana: Analys av kompressorkylteknik och fjärrvärmedriven absorptionskylteknik2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, the energy consumption in the world is increasing and Sweden is not an exception. Therefore, the continued work towards a sustainable development is essential in order for future generations to have the same opportunities as the people today. An important step towards this goal is to improve the energy efficiency until the next generations technology has been developed. As a result of this the energy resources of the earth could be saved which would lead to cost savings, due to the fact that operating costs would decrease with reduced energy consumption. A reduced electrical power generation would lead to reduced emissions of substances that affect the environment as well. The municipality of Västervik has worked towards a sustainable development for a long time; therefore energy efficiency in the public sector has been implemented.

    An analysis is done, based on a literature study and calculations, in purpose to decide if a change of the cooling system used for the outdoor ice rink in Gamleby would lead to reduced energy consumption and cost savings. The two different machines analysed are the existing compressor cooling machine and an alternative absorption cooling machine in combination with district heat from a local source. If excess of distinct heat could be used as heat source it would be positive for the environment and for sustainable development.

    Through calculations of the cooling demand, the sustainable economy and the CO2-emissions the following conclusions have been made. Since the coefficient of cooling performance is lower for the absorption cooling machine a switch of cooling system would result in a higher demand of energy (heat and power). Due to the different CO2-emission coefficients of the two energy sources a switch would lead to increase of CO2-emissions as well as reduce the efficiency of the resources of the earth.

    The investment cost for an absorption cooling machine is double the investment cost for a commercial compressor cooling machine. Therefore, calculations have shown that it would take 18 years until a change of the cooling system can be seen as cost-effective. This calculation is based on the most optimal conditions such as free district heating and a high value on the coefficient of performance. As well if the district heat would cost, a change would never be cost-effective. The life span of a cooling machine is approximately 25 years and due to the fact that the calculations for the optimal case are based on assumptions that are not confirmed, for instance the energy from the district heat would be free of charge, the authors of this study cannot recommend the change of cooling method for the ice rink seen through an economical perspective. To sum up, the conclusion is that a switch to absorption cooling will not result in an improvement in terms of energy efficiency, cost benefits or emission reduction. Instead, an analysis of the existing system should be made in order to identify efficiency improvement opportunities in areas such as optimization of the control system and reducing the cooling demand of the bandy ice by reducing heat transfer from the environment. 

  • 10.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    SLU.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekman, Anna
    Lund University.
    Karlsson, H
    SLU.
    Berlin, Johanna
    SP.
    Börjesson, Pål
    Lund University.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Janssen, Matty
    Chalmers.
    Strid, Ingrid
    SLU.
    LCA of biorefinieries -identification of key issues and methodological recommendations2013Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ahlgren, Serina
    et al.
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Ekman, Anna
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Karlsson, Hanna
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Berlin, Johanna
    SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden.
    Börjesson, Pål
    Lund University.
    Ekvall, Tomas
    IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute.
    Finnveden, Göran
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Janssen, Matty
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Strid, Ingrid
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Review of methodological choices in LCA of biorefinery systems: key issues and recommendations2015In: Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, ISSN 1932-104X, E-ISSN 1932-1031, Vol. 9, no 5, p. 606-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current trend in biomass conversion technologies is toward more efficient utilization of biomass feedstock in multiproduct biorefineries. Many life-cycle assessment (LCA) studies of biorefinery systems have been performed but differ in how they use the LCA methodology. Based on a review of existing LCA standards and guidelines, this paper provides recommendations on how to handle key methodological issues when performing LCA studies of biorefinery systems. Six key issues were identified: (i) goal definition, (ii) functional unit, (iii) allocation of biorefinery outputs, (iv) allocation of biomass feedstock, (v) land use, and (vi) biogenic carbon and timing of emissions. Many of the standards and guidelines reviewed here provide only general methodological recommendations. Some make more specific methodological recommendations, but these often differ between standards. In this paper we present some clarifications (e.g. examples of research questions and suitable functional units) and methodological recommendations (e.g. on allocation).

  • 12.
    Ahmad, Arslan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Brabant Water NV, 5200 BC 's-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands.
    Evaluation and optimization of advanced oxidation coagulation filtration (AOCF) to produce drinking water with less than 1 μg/L of arsenic2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Arsenic is an extremely poisonous element. It has been reported to cause contamination of drinking water sources in many parts of the world. The current drinking water permissible limit for arsenic in the European Union is 10 μg/L. The World Health Organization has a general rule that no substance may have a higher lifetime risk of more than 1 in 100,000. However, several studies on toxicity of arsenic suggest that purely based on health effects the arsenic limit of 10 μg/L is not sufficient. The main goal of this research was to develop an efficient arsenic removal technology that could be able to produce drinking water with an arsenic concentration of less than 1 μg/L. For this purpose, an innovative three step technique, Advanced Oxidation - Coagulation - Filtration (AOCF), was investigated through bench-scale and pilot scale experiments in the Netherlands at the water treatment plant of Dorst. Firstly, prior to the investigations on AOCF, the existing arsenic removal at the water treatment plant was investigated. Secondly, through a series of bench-scale experiments, the optimum type of coagulant, its combination dose with the selected chemical oxidant and optimum process pH were determined. Eventually, the partially optimized technique from the bench-scale was implemented at the pilot scale physical model of water treatment plant Dorst where AOCF was evaluated for arsenic removal and its effect on the removal of other common undesirable groundwater constituents. The optimized AOCF technology consistently removed arsenic from groundwater to below 1 ug/L when implemented at pilot scale. The overall effluent quality also remained acceptable. The method is efficient with both types of filtration media tested in this research i.e., virgin sand and metal oxide coated sand, however virgin sand media showed slightly better arsenic removal efficiency.

  • 13.
    Ahmad, Arslan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Evaluation of organic residues and their mixtures with Peepoos to produce fertilizer.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Peepoo, self-sanitising, biodegradable toilet is characterized by low carbon to nitrogen (C-N) ratio and low dry matter (DM) content. Principal nutrients (nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K)) are also not in a balance as required by most crops. It was expected that the mixing of used Peepoos with other organic materials might balance its chemical characteristics. In this thesis, availability and suitability of common organic materials produced in Kenya has been investigated for mixing with used Peepoo bags to obtain a balanced fertilizer product from the crop nutrition aspect. Seven organic residues were selected from the list of 13 on the basis of their availability near the processing site in Nairobi. The selected residues were then chemically analyzed for their individual plant nutrient content. The analysis results were used subsequently to simulate the chemical composition of a wide range of Peepoo-Residue mixtures. The evaluation of the theoretical mixtures based on DM content, C-N ratio and NPK ratio showed that the majority of investigated mixtures had DM content below 60 %. Majority of the mixtures showed C-N ratio between 10-1:1. All the mixtures deviated from the common nutrient uptake ratio of crops (1:0.5:1.4). Composite mixtures with more than 2 ingredients resulted in a balanced fertilizer product. The study concludes and recommends that the composite mixtures with more than two ingredients should be considered for practical processing of Peepoos into a commercial fertilizer product.

  • 14.
    Ahmad, Arslan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Hoofd Ingenieursbureau, Brabant Water N.V., 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands .
    Van De Wetering, S.
    Groenendijk, M.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Advanced Oxidation-Coagulation-Filtration (AOCF) - An innovative treatment technology for targeting drinking water with <1 μg/L of arsenic2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, CRC Press, 2014, p. 817-819Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced Oxidation-Coagulation-Filtration (AOCF) has been investigated for producing drinking water with less than 1 μg L-1 of As through a series of bench scale and pilot scale experiments. At bench scale, the suitable coagulant, its combination dose with KMnO4 oxidant, the optimum process pH and kinetics of As removal were determined. The optimized AOCF technique was capable of consistently reducing the As concentration to below 1 μg L-1 when implemented at pilot scale and did not adversely affect the already existing removal processes of Fe, Mn and NH4 +. Dual media filter solved the filter run time reduction issue.

  • 15.
    Ahmad, Zoe
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    An Assessment of the Swedish Bioeconomical Development2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Bioeconomy is an emerging term defined by the European Commission as ‘an economy based on biological,renewable resources to produce bioenergy, biobased products, services and food’. Unlike neighbouring countries Germany and Finland, Sweden lacks an official national bioeconomy strategy and the Swedish bioeconomical development is not mapped. Previous literature has not addressed the topic specifically and to do so, it was believed necessary to address relevant actors currently undergoing the bioeconomical development. It is investigated if the Swedish bioeconomical development is too slow and inefficiently regulated and if so, what measure can be taken. A literature study and 13 interviews with actors relevant to the bioeconomical transition were used to achieve the objective of the study. Concluded, the field of bioeconomy severely needs parameters to make its definition and quantification possible. Despite lacking a national bioeconomy strategy, Sweden’s bioeconomical development is not stalled. The government pursues the transition through specifically created institutions and big investments. Compared to Finland, Sweden performs well within the current bioeconomical sectors (biomass production and biobased sectors were assessed). Parameters must be established to enable a better mapping of the process and to complete the bioeconomical transition within Sweden.

  • 16.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Exploring the Effects of ICT on Environmental Sustainability: From Life Cycle Assessment to Complex Systems Modeling2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The production and consumption of information and communication technology (ICT) products and services continue to grow worldwide. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding increase in electricity use by ICT, as well as direct environmental impacts of the technology. Yet a more complicated picture of ICT’s effects is emerging. Positive indirect effects on environmental sustainability can be seen in substitution and optimization (enabling effects), and negative indirect effects can be seen in additional demand due to efficiency improvements (rebound effects).

    A variety of methods can be employed to model and assess these direct and indirect effects of ICT on environmental sustainability. This doctoral thesis explores methods of modeling and assessing environmental effects of ICT, including electronic media. In a series of five studies, three methods were at times applied in case studies and at others analyzed theoretically. These methods include life cycle assessment (LCA) and complex systems modeling approaches, including System Dynamics (SD) and agent-based (AB) modeling.

    The first two studies employ the LCA approach in a case study of an ICT application, namely, the tablet edition of a Swedish design magazine. The use of tablets has skyrocketed in recent years, and this phenomenon has been little studied to date. Potential environmental impacts of the magazine’s tablet edition were assessed and compared with those of the print edition. The tablet edition’s emerging version (which is marked by a low number of readers and low reading time per copy) resulted in higher potential environmental impacts per reader than did the print edition. However, the mature tablet edition (with a higher number of readers and greater reading time per copy) yielded lower impacts per reader in half the ten impact categories assessed.

    While previous studies of electronic media have reported that the main life-cycle contributor to environmental impacts is the use phase (which includes operational electricity use as well as the manufacture of the electronic device), the present study did not support those findings in all scenarios studied in this thesis. Rather, this study found that the number of readers played an important role in determining which life-cycle phase had the greatest impacts. For the emerging version, with few readers, content production was the leading driver of environmental impacts. For the mature version, with a higher number of readers, electronic storage and distribution were the major contributors to environmental impacts. Only when there were many readers but low overall use of the tablet device was the use phase the main contributor to environmental impacts of the tablet edition of the magazine.

    The third study goes beyond direct effects at product- and service-level LCAs, revisiting an SD simulation study originally conducted in 2002 to model indirect environmental effects of ICT in 15 European countries for the period 2000-2020. In the current study, three scenarios of the 2002 study were validated in light of new empirical data from the period 2000–2012. A new scenario was developed to revisit the quantitative and qualitative results of the original study. The results showed, inter alia, that ICT has a stimulating influence on total passenger transport, for it makes it more cost- and time-efficient (rebound effects).

    The modeling mechanism used to represent this rebound effect is further investigated in the fourth study, which discusses the feedback loops used to model two types of rebound effects in passenger transport (direct economic rebound and time rebound). Finally, the role of systems thinking and modeling in conceptualizing and communicating the dynamics of rebound effects is examined.

    The aim of the fifth study was to explore the power of systems modeling and simulation to represent nonlinearities of the complex and dynamic systems examined elsewhere in this thesis. That study reviews previous studies that have compared the SD and AB approaches and models, summarizing their purpose, methodology, and results, based on certain criteria for choosing between SD and AB approaches. The transformation procedure used to develop an AB model for purposes of comparison with an SD model is also explored.

    In conclusion, first-order or direct environmental effects of ICT production, use, and disposal can be assessed employing an LCA method. This method can also be used to assess second-order or enabling effects by comparing ICT applications with conventional alternatives. However, the assessment of enabling effects can benefit from systems modeling methods, which are able to formally describe the drivers of change, as well as the dynamics of complex social, technical, and environmental systems associated with ICT applications. Such systems methods can also be used to model third-order or rebound effects of efficiency improvements by ICT.

  • 17.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Modeling the Effects of ICT on Environmental Sustainability: Revisiting a System Dynamics Model Developed for the European Commission2015In: ICT Innovations for Sustainability / [ed] Hilty, L.M.; Aebischer, B., Switzerland: Springer Publishing Company, 2015, p. 449-474Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter revisits a System Dynamics model developed in 2002 with the aim of exploring the future impacts of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) on environmental sustainability in the EU, which then consisted of 15 countries. The time horizon of the study was 20 years (2000–2020). We analyze the results in light of empirical data that is now available for 2000–2012. None of the three scenarios that were developed by experts to specify the external factors needed to run the model were realistic from today’s point of view. If the model is re-run with more realistic input data for the first half of the simulation period, however, the main results regarding the impact of ICT remain qualitatively the same; they seem to be relatively robust implications of the causal system structure, as it is represented in the model. Overall, the impacts of ICT for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental burdens for 2020 tend to be slightly stronger if the simulation is based on the empirical data now available.

  • 18.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology. Department of Informatics, University of Zurich.
    Modelling Rebound Effects in System Dynamics2014In: Proceedings of the 28th Conference on Environmental Informatics - EnviroInfo 2014 - ICT for Energy Efficiency / [ed] Marx Gómez, J., Sonnenschein, M., Vogel, U., Winter, A., Rapp, B., Giesen, N., Germany: BIS Oldenburg, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The induction of demand by increasing the efficiency of a production or consumption process is known as the rebound effect. Feedback loops in System Dynamics can be used to conceptualize the structure of this complex phenomenon and also for communicating model-based insights. In passenger transport, the rebound effect can be induced through increased cost efficiency (direct economic rebound) and/or increase in speed (time rebound). In this paper we review and compare two models on environmental effects of passenger transport—including a model on the role of information and communication technology. We highlight the feedback mechanisms used to deal with the rebound effect (price, efficiency, and time rebound).

  • 19.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) and University of Zurich, Department of Informatics.
    System Dynamics vs. agent-based modeling—comparing models and approaches: A literature review and a transformation procedureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems modeling and simulation methods such as System Dynamics (SD) and agent-based (AB) modeling have been used to foster a better understanding of the dynamics and complexity of natural, technical, and social systems. System Dynamics provides an aggregate-level perspective, highlighting thinking in feedback loops and employing differential equations to model the causal relations in a system, exploring the system's dynamics by numerically solving the equations. Agent-based modeling, in a bottom-up method, focuses on constituent units (agents) and their interactions to explore the emerging behavior at a system level by means of simulation. Comparing these modeling methods can help us understand their strengths and weaknesses in order to choose the right approach for a given modeling problem. It may also support the analysis of a given system to build multiple models using the different approaches and comparing them, in particular to treat fundamental uncertainties in systems modeling and simulation. In this paper, we review the existing studies comparing the SD and AB approaches and models, investigating the aims, methodology, and results of such comparative studies. We also highlight lessons learned for future model comparisons by examining how the corresponding SD and AB models are built for the purpose of comparison. A procedure for transforming System Dynamics models into agent-based models is presented and discussed using examples from the literature.

  • 20.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Technology and Society Lab , 9014 St. Gallen, Switzerland .
    Hilty, Lorenz M.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. University of Zürich, , Department of Informatics, CH-8050 Zürich, Switzerland; Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Technology and Society Lab , 9014 St. Gallen, Switzerland .
    Using Systems Thinking and System Dynamics Modeling to Understand Rebound Effects2016In: Advances And New Trends In Environmental And Energy Informatics / [ed] Jorge Marx Gómez, Michael Sonnenschein, Andreas Winter, Ute Vogel, Barbara Rapp Nils Giesen, Cham, Switzerland: Springer Publishing Company, 2016, p. 237-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Processes leading to an increase of demand for a resource as a consequence of increasing the efficiency of using this resource in production or consumption are known as (direct) rebound effects. Rebound effects at micro and macro levels tend to offset the reduction in resource consumption enabled by progress in efficiency. Systems thinking and modeling instruments such as causal loop diagrams and System Dynamics can be used to conceptualize the structure of this complex phenomenon and also to communicate model-based insights. In passenger transport, the rebound effect can be invoked by increased cost efficiency (direct economic rebound) and/or increase in speed (time rebound). In this paper we review and compare two existing models on passenger transport—including a model on the role of information and communication technology—with regard to the feedback loops used to conceptualize rebound effects.

  • 21.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Moberg, Åsa
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hochschorner, Elisabeth
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Life Cycle Assessment of a Magazine: Part I: Tablet Edition in Emerging and Mature States2015In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 19, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is providing new ways to access media content. ICT has environmental benefits and burdens. The overall goal of the present study was to assess the environmental impacts of production and consumption of magazines read on tablets from a life cycle perspective. Important goals were to identify the activities giving rise to the main impacts and the key factors influencing the overall environmental impacts. Data gaps and uncertainties were also addressed. The results are compared against those for the print edition of the magazine in a separate article (part 2). The methodology used in the study was life cycle assessment. The environmental impacts assessed included climate change, cumulative energy/exergy demand, metal depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification, freshwater/marine eutrophication, fossil depletion, human toxicity, and ecotoxicity. The results indicate that content production can be the major contributor to environmental impacts if readers are few (as for the emerging version of the magazine studied). Assuming more readers (more mature version) or a larger file size for the tablet magazine, electronic storage and distribution may be the major contributor. Thus, in contrast to previous studies on electronic media, which reported a dominant impact of the use phase, this study found a higher impact for content production (emerging version) and electronic storage and distribution (mature version). However, with inefficient, low overall use of the tablet with a mature version of the tablet magazine, the greatest impact was shown to come from the reading activity (i.e., the use phase). In conclusion, the relative impacts of the tablet magazine would decrease considerably with high numbers of readers, their efficient use of the tablet (i.e., for many purposes over a long life of the device), and a smaller magazine file.

  • 22.
    Ahmadi, Leila
    et al.
    Energy, Mining and Environment, National Research Council Canada.
    Young, Steven B.
    School of Environment, Enterprise and Development|, University of Waterloo.
    Fowler, Michael
    Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo.
    Fraser, Roydon A.
    Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo.
    Ahmadi Achachlouei, Mohammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    A cascaded life cycle: reuse of electric vehicle lithium-ion battery packs in energy storage systems2015In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery packs recovered from end-of-life electric vehicles (EV) present potential technological, economic and environmental opportunities for improving energy systems and material efficiency. Battery packs can be reused in stationary applications as part of a “smart grid”, for example to provide energy storage systems (ESS) for load leveling, residential or commercial power. Previous work on EV battery reuse has demonstrated technical viability and shown energy efficiency benefits in energy storage systems modeled under commercial scenarios. The current analysis performs a life cycle assessment (LCA) study on a Li-ion battery pack used in an EV and then reused in a stationary ESS.

    Methods

    A complex functional unit is used to combine energy delivered by the battery pack from the mobility function and the stationary ESS. Various scenarios of cascaded “EV mobility plus reuse in stationary clean electric power scenarios” are contrasted with “conventional system mobility with internal combustion engine vehicles plus natural gas peaking power.” Eight years are assumed for first use; with 10 years for reuse in the stationary application. Operational scenarios and environmental data are based on real time-of-day and time-of-year power use. Additional data from LCA databases are utilized. Ontario, Canada, is used as the geographic baseline; analysis includes sensitivity to the electricity mix and battery degradation. Seven environmental categories are assessed using ReCiPe.

    Results and discussion

    Results indicate that the manufacturing phase of the Li-ion battery will still dominate environmental impacts across the extended life cycle of the pack (first use in vehicle plus reuse in stationary application). For most impact categories, the cascaded use system appears significantly beneficial compared to the conventional system. By consuming clean energy sources for both use and reuse, global and local environmental stress reductions can be supported. Greenhouse gas advantages of vehicle electrification can be doubled by extending the life of the EV batteries, and enabling better use of off-peak low-cost clean electricity or intermittent renewable capacity. However, questions remain concerning implications of long-duration use of raw material resources employed before potential recycling.

    Conclusions

    Li-ion battery packs present opportunities for powering both mobility and stationary applications in the necessary transition to cleaner energy. Battery state-of-health is a considerable determinant in the life cycle performance of a Li-ion battery pack. The use of a complex functional unit was demonstrated in studying a component system with multiple uses in a cascaded application.

  • 23.
    Ahmed, Amber
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Gong, Jindan
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Assessment of the Electricity Generation Mix in Ghana: the Potential of Renewable Energy2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity is a fundamental part a functioning society. Ghana’s electricity system is strained by an ever-growing climate instability and increase of population. Therefore, it is crucial for the country's development that it's electricity supply is done in a sustainable way.

    This report aims to analyze Ghana’s ability to reach SDG 7.1 and the Marrakech Vision, an outcome from the COP 22 meeting in Morocco. This was done by creating a model over Ghana’s electricity system and how it develops over time, called BAU, using the analytical tools: OSeMOSYS and OnSSET. A practical implementation of BAU was then discussed. After that, three development scenarios with different renewable energy targets for the electricity system, were implemented in the model. The results show that CSP and natural gas power plants were the most prominent electricity producers. The growing share of renewable energy in the target scenarios was mostly due to wind power, replacing the natural gas power plants.

    Ghana has local natural gas resources as well as high solar potential. The rising share of renewable energy limits the fossil fuel emission. At the same time, this increased share also endangers the reliability of the electricity supply, as the capacity of renewable energy resources fluctuate and could lead to high investment costs. BAU can be a possible solution which minimizes the fossil fuel consumption and limits the CO2 emissions, but at the risk of possibly having an unreliable electricity supply. To be able to meet SDG 7.1, increasing the share of renewable energy in electricity generation can be a solution, but at the same time, not all requirements of the goal will be fulfilled.

  • 24. Ahmed, K. M.
    et al.
    Bhattacharya, Prosun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Groundwater arsenic mitigation in Bangladesh: Two decades of advancements in scientific research and policy instruments2014In: One Century of the Discovery of Arsenicosis in Latin America (1914-2014): As 2014 - Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, 2014, p. 886-888Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two decades have passed since the first detection of arsenic above allowable limits in groundwater of Bangladesh. A good number of scientific research and mitigation projects have so far been completed but still today more than 22 million people are exposed to arsenic leaves of 50 μg L-1 or more. As there are many untested new wells, it is not precisely known how many people are exposed to what level. Scientific knowledge about occurrences, distribution and release mechanisms have enhanced significantly. Although deep tube wells have emerged as the most effective mitigation measure over most of the country, still there are areas where this does not work. Recent studies reported effectiveness of alternative options like intermediate deep wells and subsurface arsenic removal. There has been a major paradigm shift in the policy arena regarding arsenic mitigation.

  • 25. Ahtiainen, Heini
    et al.
    Artell, Janne
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Hasselström, Linus
    Enveco.
    Håkansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Baltic Sea nutrient reductions: What should we aim for?2014In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 145, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient load reductions are needed to improve the state of the Baltic Sea, but it is still under debate how they should be implemented. In this paper, we use data from an environmental valuation study conducted in all nine Baltic Sea states to investigate public preferences of relevance to three of the involved decision-dimensions: First, the roles of nitrogen versus phosphorus reductions causing different eutrophication effects; second, the role of time – the lag between actions to reduce nutrient loads and perceived improvements; and third; the spatial dimension and the roles of actions targeting the coastal and open sea environment and different sub-basins. Our findings indicate that respondents view and value the Baltic Sea environment as a whole, and are not focussed only on their local sea area, or a particular aspect of water quality. We argue that public preferences concerning these three perspectives should be one of the factors guiding marine policy. This requires considering the entire range of eutrophication effects, in coastal and open sea areas, and including long-term and short-term measures.

  • 26.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Brandt, Nils
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology (moved 20130630).
    Lysenkova, Mariya
    Smedberg, Niklas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Looplocal - a heuristic visualization tool to support the strategic facilitation of industrial symbiosis2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 98, p. 328-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Industrial symbiosis (IS) developments have been differentiated as self-organized, facilitated, and planned. This article introduces a tool, Looplocal, which has been built with objectives to support the strategic facilitation of IS. Looplocal is a visualization tool built to assist in 1) Simplifying the identification of regions susceptible to new industrial symbiosis facilitation activities 2) Enabling proactive and targeted marketing of potential exchanges to key actors in specific regions and 3) Assisting facilitators to assess the various strategies and consequential engagement and analysis methodologies suitable for additional IS development in specific regions. The tool compares industrial symbiosis data and estimated regional material and energy flows (on a facility level) to identify potential IS transfer information along with key stakeholder and network data. The authors have performed a proof of concept run of this tool on Sweden. In its early stages of application the method has given results seen as useful for identifying regions susceptible to the investment of symbiosis facilitators' time and resources. The material focus and customization possibilities for the tool show potential for a spectrum of potential facilitators: from waste management companies to national or regional authorities. In conjunction with long term business models, such a tool might be utilized throughout an adaptive chain of facilitation activities and aims.

  • 27.
    Aid, Graham
    et al.
    Ragn-Sells AB.
    Lazarevic, David
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology. Finnish Environment Institute SYKE.
    Kihl, Anders
    Ragn-Sells AB.
    Waste to Resources: Moving Toward the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Akram, Muhammad
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    A Freundlich-based model for prediction of pH-dependent sulfate adsorption in forest soil.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The period of industrialization after the second World War in Europe released SO2 and NOx by combustion of fossil fuels and contributed the formation of S and N compounds in the forest ecosystem. The Swedish forest soil systems were influenced by emissions of SO2 followed by H2SO4 deposition, consequently the pool of SO42- had increased in the forest ecosystem. This thesis studied SO42- adsorption in a podzolic Bs horizon soils taken from a Swedish forest soil system. The soil samples from five different sampling sites were collected and the results revealed different amounts of adsorbed SO42- in response to changes in equilibrium concentration and pH. This study found that the amount of adsorbed SO42- (mmol/kg) increased with an added equilibrium concentration of SO42- (mmol/l) and with a decreasing pH. This was determined by equilibration experiments. Based on the results a Freundlich-based model was developed to predict the pool of adsorbed SO42- in the soil samples. The model predicted the pool of adsorbed SO42- (mmol/kg) as a function of pH and the equilibrium concentration of SO42- (mmol/l) in the soil solution system. The extended Freundlich model was optimized in three different ways: by use of unconstrained, constrained and simplified two-point calibration. The results showed that the adsorption of sulfate in the Kloten Bs1 and Risbergshöjden B soils was higher as compared to the Tärnsjo B, Österström B, and Risfallet B soils. The coefficient of determination (R2) determined from an unconstrained fit of the extended Freundlich model (with three adjustable parameters) for Risbergshöjden B and Kloten Bs1 were R2 =0.998 and R2=0.993. Nearly as good fits were found in a constrained fit with two adjustable parameters when it was assumed that nearly 2 protons (2 H+) are co-adsorbed with one SO42- ion (Risbergshöjden B; R2=0.997 and Kloten Bs; R2=0.992). The simplified two-point calibration with two adjustable parameters showed similar parameter values for all most soils and was considered the best optimization method of extended Freundlich model, especially as it requires only limited input data.

  • 29.
    Alam, Mohammad Faiz
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Evaluating the benefit-cost  ratio of groundwater abstraction for additional irrigation water on global scale.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Projections show that to feed a growing population which is expected to reach 9.1 billion in 2050 would require raising overall food production by some 70 percent by 2050. One of the possible ways to increase agricultural production is through increasing yields by expanding irrigation. This study assesses the potential costs and benefits associated with sustainable groundwater abstraction to provide for irrigation.The feasibility of groundwater abstraction is determined using a combination of three indicators:groundwater recharge, groundwater quality (salinity) and sustainability (no depletion). Global groundwater recharge estimates used, are simulated with the Lund-Potsdam-Jena dynamic global vegetation model with managed lands (LPJmL). The cost of groundwater abstraction is determinedon a spatially explicit scale on global level at a grid resolution of 0.5°. Groundwater abstraction cost is divided into two parts: capital costs and operational costs. The potential benefit of increased water supply for irrigation is given by the water shadow price which is determined by using a Model of Agricultural Production and its Impact on the Environment (MAgPIE). The water shadow price for water is calculated in areas where irrigation water is scarce based on the potential increase in agricultural production through additional water and it reflects the production value of an additional unit of water. The water shadow price is given on a 0.5° grid resolution in US $/m3. Combining the cost of abstraction and the water shadow price, the benefit cost ratio is calculated globally on a spatially explicit scale to determine where investment in groundwater irrigation wouldbe beneficial. Finally, the results are analysed in global, regional and country perspectives. The results show that groundwater abstraction is beneficial for an area of 135 million hectares which is around 8.8% of the total crop area in the year 2005. Europe show the highest potential with an area of ~ 50 million hectares with a majority of the area located in France, Italy, Germany and Poland. Second is North America with an area of ~ 43.5 million hectares located in the Eastern states where the irrigation infrastructure is less developed as compared to the Western states. Sub-Saharan Africa shows a potential of ~ 15.4 million hectares in the Southern and Eastern countries of Zimbabwe, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Ethiopia and some parts of South Africa. South Asia despite extensive groundwater extraction shows only a moderate potential of ~ 9 million hectares, mostly located in India whereas China shows almost no potential. This is due to extensive groundwater depleted areas which were removed from the analysis and low water shadow prices which made abstraction not beneficial. Well installation costs play an important role in developing countries in regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where a reduction in costs would lead to an increase in area by more than 30%. Subsidy analyses shows that substantial increase in crop land areas where a benefit cost ratio >1 takes place in India with subsidised energy prices but this effect is found to be negligible in Mexico. This study is, to the author’s knowledge, the first to assess the benefit cost ratio of groundwater abstraction on a global scale by determining spatially explicit abstraction costs. The results show that a great potential for groundwater abstraction exists in all regions despite problems of groundwater depletion due to disparity in distribution and development of groundwater resources. Energy subsidies and cheap well installation techniques are the two factors that could bring down the abstraction costs which are quite important in developing regions where farm incomes are low. Also, groundwater irrigation potential not only exists in arid areas of Africa and South Asia where irrigation is needed but also in humid areas of Europe and North America where groundwater irrigation can play an important role in building resilience to events of drought. However, it is essential to not to follow the path that has led to groundwater depletion in many parts of the world and develop this potential in a sustainable way through groundwater use regulations, policies and efficient technologies.

  • 30.
    Al-Azawi, Sundus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hydrophobic sand to combat water scarcity – Properties and possible chemical risk.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The city of Dubai, which lies in the Middle East is, as many other cities in the area, suffering from shortage of fresh water resources. This issue is handled by desalination of sea water, which is a rather expensive procedure. Recently, the city tends to promote using hydrophobic sand in order to reduce irrigation water quantity and watering durations. Economically, this procedure has fewer costs than water desalination but concerns were raised regarding whether the chemical compounds, used in the treatment process of normal sand, impose any contamination risks for soil and groundwater.

    Due to the fact that normal sand has high permeability comparing to other types of soil, such as silt and clay, the rates of water seepage in normal sand is considerably high which results high water consumption in agriculture. One of the objectives of this thesis is to identify the most effective design for utilizing hydrophobic sand and normal sand layers to obtain the most suitable permeability rates for plantation purposes. Another objective is to discuss the probability of organic chemicals and heavy metals seepage when using the hydrophobic sand in soil; leaching tests were carried out to provide input to this discussion. The study showed that the hydrophobic sand has higher permeability than normal sand when it is saturated with water. However, it needs a considerably longer time in order to reach the saturation stage so recommendations were provided to use a separate layer of hydrophobic sand beneath the normal sand layer where vegetation is planted and avoid using sand mixtures.

    Based on the leaching tests’ results, it was also concluded that negligible concentrations of the organic silica compounds will be released into soil and ground water and the rates of heavy metals in leaching water were within the allowable limits. However, the possibility of the transformation of the organic compounds, used for normal sand treatment, into silica-free organic compounds was not discussed in this thesis. In other words, the usage of hydrophobic sand for agriculture purposes does not threaten the safety of neither soil nor groundwater concerning the leaching of the chemical compounds and metals that were tested in this study.

  • 31.
    Albarède, Manon
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    How to facilitate the implementation of Industrial Ecology?: Development of a grid analysis framework to assess a territory's potential based on case studies in South Korea, Japan, China, Great-Britain and Sweden2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 32.
    Albrecht, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Enabling socio-technical transitions – electric vehicles and high voltage electricity grids as focal points of low emission futures2017Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today humankind is facing numerous sustainability challenges that require us to question CO2 intensive practices like those present in the transport and energy sector. To meet those challenges, many countries have adopted ambitious climate targets. Achieving such targets requires an understanding of the wider socio-technical context of transitions. The aim of this licentiate thesis is therefore to analyse such socio-technical transitions towards low-emission futures enabled by the electrification of passenger cars and high voltage grid development.

    A combination of different transitions theories (for ex. Multi-level perspective and Technological innovation systems) and institutional theory has been used. To reach the aim paper I analyses the climate impacts of electric vehicles (EVs) and policy measures to achieve a breakthrough scenario for EVs. The results show that a mixture of short and long term policies are needed that take into account the technology development stage and behavioural aspects of EV adopters. Paper II addresses the need to include the high voltage transmission grid and its planning procedures as a central part of debates on transitions. Therefore the opportunities, challenges and reasons for conflict in the established regime are studied. The results show that in order to achieve a sustainable grid development regime, it is necessary to spend time on achieving legitimacy and social sustainability. The third paper uses semi-structured expert interviews and focuses on innovation dynamics for EV adoption. By focusing on dynamics instead of single policy measures, it is possible to grasp interactions within a niche, but also in between a niche, regime and landscape. The results show that strong initial technology legitimacy was needed to start substantial innovation dynamics. This could be further strengthened with a strong and broad coalition of actors. Both those factors led, if present, to an improved variety and match of policy instruments.

    As such this thesis has shown that transitions are not just about technology or policy instruments as such but about the dynamics and processes needed to enable them. This can be relevant in other transitions that otherwise may underestimate the importance of these components.

  • 33.
    Albrecht, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nordic power road map 2050: Strategic choices towards carbon neutrality. D4.1.R Institutional grid review.2013Report (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Albrecht, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    System innovation dynamics around electric vehicles. The cases of Norway, Denmark and Sweden.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the comparison of electric car innovation patterns in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. Doing so, it takes a closer look at what the most essential dynamics in the systems were over time and what enabled those dynamics. The main research aim is to contribute to a wider understanding of why Norway is so much ahead of Sweden and Denmark in electric car adoption. The purpose is also to adopt a perspective that goes beyond a mere focus on economic policy instruments. In order to do so different theory elements are combined in a framework. These elements stem from the transition theory literature field, especially the technological innovation system (TIS) and the multi-level perspective (MLP). This combination allows analysing the development behind a dynamic, not just when it comes to an innovation itself but also with regards to the established regime. The data is gathered through analysis of existing documents and data as well as a series of 27 expert interviews conducted in the three case countries. The findings suggest that there are important differences in transition patterns that can account for the electric vehicle (EV) diffusion situation we can find nowadays in the three Nordic countries. An important stepping stone was the need for a very strong legitimacy of the original EV vision that is also anchored in a coordinated, sector overarching coalition of actors that thinks strategically and long term. Moreover some general beneficial dynamics could be identified across the countries in question. In Norway these beneficial dynamics can be summarised as a systems motor, in Denmark as a failed entrepreneurial motor that shifted towards a constrained municipal motor and in Sweden as a loosely, coordinated and weaker version of a systems motor.

  • 35.
    Albrecht, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nilsson, Måns
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms). Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Electrification of vehicles – policy drivers and impacts in two scenarios.2013In: Grid Integration of Electric Vehicles in Open Electricity Markets / [ed] Qiuwei Wu, John Wiley & Sons, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter examines current policy drivers of battery electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid EVs, the current and anticipated impacts on carbon emissions, as well as what potential role policy can play in enhancing the innovation system and market development around such vehicles in the future. We start with a policy review of key targets in the Nordic countries and the EU, up to 2030, and discuss to what extent they are consistent with industry and expert estimates of how the systems can grow. On the basis of this, the second part elaborates two simple scenarios of EV development in the EU: one breakthrough expansion scenario and one incremental expansion scenario. Building on that is an analysis of the climate impacts of the two scenarios, given different assumptions relating to, for example, electricity production as well as EV penetration in the fleet. The third part examines what policy drivers might be needed to enable the breakthrough scenario, using a technological innovation systems perspective to describe the needed processes, drivers and developments.

  • 36.
    Albrecht, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nilsson, Måns
    Åkerman, Jonas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Nordic power road map 2050:Strategic choices towards carbon neutrality. D4.2.R Policy and Institutional Review Electric Vehicles (EV).2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report examines policy drivers of electric vehicles (EVs), and what potential role policy can play in enhancing the innovation and market development of EVs. We start with a policy review of key targets in the Nordic countries and the EU, up to 2030, and discuss to what extent they are consistent with industry, government and expert estimates of how the EV innovation systems can grow. On the basis of this, the second part examines what policy drivers might be needed to enable a breakthrough scenario, using a technological innovation systems (TIS) perspective to describe the needed processes, drivers and developments in policy and technology.

  • 37.
    Alcalá Borao, Raquel
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Oxidation of pharmaceuticals by chlorine dioxide in wastewater effluent.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment has raised an emerging interest due to the fact that they pose negative environmental impact and health hazards related to long-term toxicity effects. As conventional treatments are not able to totally remove these substances it is necessary to seek for alternative advanced technologies such as oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). The objective of this master thesis is thus to find the most optimal dose – reaction time of ClO2 for the oxidation and maximum removal of selected environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals. Factorial design and subsequent optimization with MODDE was selected as the best approach to find the optimal dose – time. Batch oxidation tests were conducted on 100mL aliquots treated with ClO2 using wastewater effluent from Henriksdal WWTP. Thereafter solid phase extraction and final determination of pharmaceuticals was carried out on a high performance liquid chromatography- triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Results showed that applying a dose of 5 mg ClO2/L and a reaction time of 10 minutes, it is possible to remove more than a half of the 17 analyzed substances. Besides most of the pharmaceuticals with high and moderate environmental risk, would pose a low risk for the environment after treatment with the optimal ClO2 dose – reaction time. Despite the fact that ClO2 could successfully degrade most environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals, deeper research concerning the formation of toxic by-products after oxidative treatment needs to be done before upscaling this technology to pilot or full scale as a suitable end of pipe technology for pharmaceuticals removal.

  • 38.
    Alfredsson, Eva C.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Malmaeus, J. Mikael
    Prospects for economic growth in the 21st century: A survey covering mainstream, heterodox and scientifically oriented perspectives2017In: Economic Issues, ISSN 1363-7029, Vol. 22, p. 65-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the importance of economic growth for the current economy, business and societal planning there are few long-term growth projections undertaken. There is, however, a vivid debate on what is called the 'new normal' - secular stagnation - which is undertaken within academic disciplines. This overview covers mainstream, heterodox and scientifically oriented economic perspectives on the prospects for economic growth in the 21st century. The survey shows that existing long-term projections and scenarios indicate growth rates ranging from around half a percentage point less than during the last two decades (projected by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD), to dramatically lower growth rates). Differences stem from different perspectives on the determinants of economic growth and the potential for improvements in productivity. Headwinds are: an aging population, especially in OECD countries; resource constraints, including energy; increasing environmental costs in particular due to the consequences of climate change; overaccumulation; increasing income differences; and declining social capital. One conclusion is that policymaking based on the assumption that economic growth will continue at pre-crisis levels is unwise and risky.

  • 39. Alnaami, Zurya
    et al.
    Duenas, José
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Wind Power Integration and Operational Challenges2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Wind power generation has gained considerable relevance in global energy markets in the last few decades. The technology behind wind turbines and their integration to the power grid are still the focus of considerable research. How exactly does this energy source influence the existing power distribution grid is still a matter of interest to many parties. The method used in this report is based on a literature study which intends to examine what is the current state of energy generation based on wind power in Sweden. In the report we have analyzed some of the integration and operational challenges of connecting a large amount of wind generated electricity to the power grid and attempted to provide an accurate and up to date summary of what these challenges will entail in the coming decade. Our results show that further research would greatly improve the current technology used in wind power generation to allow such a high level penetration. 

  • 40. AlSkaif, T.
    et al.
    Zapata, M. G.
    Bellalta, B.
    Nilsson, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    A distributed power sharing framework among households in microgrids: a repeated game approach2016In: Computing, ISSN 0010-485X, E-ISSN 1436-5057, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In microgrids, the integration of distributed energy resources (DERs) in the residential sector can improve power reliability, and potentially reduce power demands and carbon emissions. Improving the utilization of renewable energy in households is a critical challenge for DERs. In this regard, renewable power sharing is one of the possible solutions to tackle this problem. Even though this solution has attracted significant attention recently, most of the proposed power sharing frameworks focus more on centralized schemes. In contrast, in this paper, the performance of a proposed distributed power sharing framework is investigated. The problem is formulated as a repeated game between households in a microgrid. In this game, each household decides to cooperate and borrow/lend some amount of renewable power from/to a neighboring household, or to defect and purchase the entire demands from the main grid based on a payoff function. The Nash equilibrium of this game is characterized and the effect of the strategies taken by the households on the system is analyzed. We conduct an extensive evaluation using real demand data from 12 households of different sizes and power consumption profiles in Stockholm. Numerical results indicate that cooperation is beneficial from both an economical and environmental perspective and that households can achieve cost savings up to 20 %.

  • 41. Al-Yaarubi, A. H.
    et al.
    Pain, C. C.
    Grattoni, C. A.
    Zimmerman, Robert W.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Navier-Stokes Simulations of Fluid Flow Through a Rock Fracture2013In: Dynamic Fluids and Transport Through in Fractured Rock, American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2013, p. 55-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A surface profilometer was used to measure fracture profiles every 10 microns over the surfaces of a replica of a fracture in a red Permian sandstone, to within an accuracy of a few microns. These surface data were used as input to two finite element codes that solve the Navier-Stokes equations and the Reynolds equation, respectively. Numerical simulations of flow through these measured aperture fields were carried out at different values of the mean aperture, corresponding to different values of the relative roughness. Flow experiments were also conducted in casts of two regions of the fracture. At low Reynolds numbers, the Navier-Stokes simulations yielded transmissivities for the two fracture regions that were closer to the experimental values than were the values predicted by the lubrication model. In general, the lubrication model overestimated the transmissivity by an amount that varied as a function of the relative roughness, defined as the standard deviation of the aperture divided by the mean aperture. The initial deviations from linearity, for Reynolds numbers in the range 1-10, were consistent with the "weak inertia" model developed by Mei and Auriault for porous media, and with the results obtained computationally by Skjetne et al in 1999 on a two-dimensional self-affine fracture. In the regime 10 < Re < 40, both the computed and measured transmissivities could be fit very well to a Forchheimer-type equation, in which the additional pressure drop varies quadratically with the Reynolds number.

  • 42.
    Amatya, Anjali
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Study on Process Performance and Evaluation of Dala Vatten’s Two Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants.2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Dala Vatten AB has been operating two municipal wastewater treatment plant namely Gagnef wastewater treatment plant and Tällberg wastewater treatment plant since 1970’s and 1950’s respectively in Dalarna, middle of Sweden. These both traditional treatment plants have been updated with continuous and intermittent aerated biological treatment facilities: Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) in 2012 and 2007 respectively. Recently, more detailed process performance and evaluation of both plants is required focusing on energy consumption. The objective of this master thesis is thus to investigate the opportunities in reducing energy consumption from both plants to save operation cost, identify the opportunities for chemical saving, if possible reduce the excess sludge so produced from the plant and potential optimization of the process for its plant’s sustainability. The laboratory study was made in May and August, 2015 with grab sampling and flow proportional sampling method. The analysation was carried out with several wastewater parameters: BOD7, COD, TOC, TP, NH4-N and TN with Hach Lange analysing method.

    Results showed that both continue and intermittent aerated plants have higher process performance with lower effluent organic (BOD7, COD) and TP loading to the recipient. Gagnef WWTP with continuous aeration has demonstrated an excessive use of chemical, sludge production and high-energy consumption by the blower serving MBBR during the studied period. By contrast, Tällberg WWTP with intermittent aeration has proved to be successful in terms of lower energy consumption by the blower serving the MBBR but failed to show improved specific energy efficiency for each pollutant load during the studied period. The recommendation in improvising energy saving and saving operation cost at both treatment plants was put forward.

  • 43.
    An, Jihyun
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Feminist Futures: Futures studies through the lens of feminist epistemologies2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how futures studies could engage with critical feminist perspectives in an intrinsic manner and what feminist futures might mean. The study brings attention to the less discussed subject of epistemological basis in futures studies. Literature study and semi-structured interviews with practitioners and researchers working with feminist approaches in the fields related to futures development was deployed. I’ve analyzed Wendell Bell’s discussion on epistemological foundation of futures studies from feminist epistemological perspective, and have suggested the potential of feminist epistemology of situated knowledges and partial objectivity for futures studies. Based on the findings from the semi-structured interviews, an alternative feminist scenario set in Swedish society in the year of 2050 in the format of a fiction is presented with the aim to provide a detailed and situated narrative of political and daily lives in feminist futures. The feminist futures scenario should not be understood as the singular feminist future suggested for implementation. The intention is to demonstrate how the visionary dimensions of feminist studies could be articulated in various forms of futures studies, and to open up space for rich debates on envisioning feminist futures. 

  • 44.
    Andersson, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Olausson, Linus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Identifiering av mervärden i EPC-projekt2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this report a study is carried out with the aim to identify added values of EPC projects implemented in schools in order to increase the interest of EPC projects on the market. The report examines how the planned maintenance, supervision, maintenance and corrective maintenance is affected, how insurance premiums and terms are affected, the indoor environment and how the tasks of the operating staff is changing. A literature study of energy savings, energy use in schools, maintenance and insurance as well as how energy efficiency improvements are related to the Swedish environmental objectives has been made. Visits were carried out in Ludvika, interviews were also carried out with operation technicians and local strategists in Ludvika as well as employees of insurance companies.

    Schools often have neglected maintenance and problems with ventilation and indoor environment. Schools also have a large energy saving potential due to their low utilization, mainly because they are empty parts of the year. All Swedish schools could reduce their electricity consumption by 1 TWh per year, which in money equivalents to the salary costs of about 2,000 teaching positions.

    8 schools in Ludvika and 10 schools in Piteå who has completed EPC projects have been studied. The time periods studied are seven years for Ludvika, 2006 – 2012, and for Piteå five years, 2010 – 2014. The data of fault reports and maintenance costs are taken from the municipalities, and descriptions of schools and EPC projects have been received from Caverion who has carried out the EPC projects. Data for maintenance has to some extent been selected in consultation with employees at the municipalities.

    The number of error reports in Piteå schools have shown a slight downward trend with a peak while the EPC project was carried out and one year after. Ludvika has shown an upward trend in maintenance costs, but this is probably due to previously accumulated maintenance. The amount of corrective maintenance is reduced, but only after the project when newly found errors have been fixed and the systems have been properly adjusted. The tasks related to supervisory and maintenance has changed when remote control of systems was installed which leads to a better overview and simplifies troubleshooting. The indoor temperature got more stable, but only after they fixed the weaknesses revealed in connection with the operational optimization. However, there are complaints in Ludvika of low temperatures, but it is caused the target temperature being set too low by the municipality. Insurance is only marginally affected, and only when damage prevention measures are implemented in the properties, which is not done in the studied properties. However, the underlying data sets are too small and over a too small time period to prove any certain changes.

    An added value identified is the ability to use EPC projects as a tool to address deferred maintenance in the real estate portfolio outside the normal budgetary framework while achieving energy savings. 

  • 45.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.
    Borgström, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering. Stockholms universitet, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McPhearson, Timon
    The New School, New York.
    Double Insurance in Dealing with Extremes:Ecological and Social Factors for MakingNature-Based Solutions Last2017In: Nature‐based Solutions to Climate Change Adaptationin Urban Areas: Theory and Practice of Urban Sustainability Transitions / [ed] Kabisch, N.,Korn, H., Stadler, J.,Bonn, A., Germany: Springer, 2017, p. 51-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global urbanisation has led to extreme population densities often in areasprone to problems such as extreme heat, storm surges, coastal and surface flooding,droughts and fires. Although nature based solutions (NBS) often have specifictargets,one of the overarching objectives with NBS design and implementation is toprotect human livelihoods and well-being, not least by protecting real estate andbuilt infrastructure. However, NBS need to be integrated and spatially and functionallymatched with other land uses, which requires that their contribution to societyis recognised. This chapter will present an ecologically grounded, resilience theoryand social-ecological systems perspective on NBS, with a main focus on how functioningecosystems contribute to the ‘solutions’. We will outline some of the basicprinciples and frameworks for studying and including insurance value in worktowards climate change adaptation and resilience, with a special emphasis on theneed to address both internal and external insurance. As we will demonstratethrough real world examples as well as theory, NBS should be treated as dynamiccomponents nested within larger systems and influenced by social as well as ecologicalfactors. Governance processes seeking to build urban resilience to climatechange in cities and other urban dynamics will need to consider both layers of insurancein order to utilize the powerful role NBS can play in creating sustainable,healthy, and liveable urban systems.

  • 46.
    Andersson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Hållbarhetsstyrning i renoveringsprocessens senare skede: Uppföljning & förvaltning2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bostadssektorn svarar för en betydande del av landets totala miljöpåverkan, men det finns stor potential till förbättringar. Sektorn står inför ett omfattande renoveringsbehov, vilket skapar goda förutsättningar för sociala och miljöförbättrande åtgärder. För att lyckas krävs det bland annat strukturerade arbetsmetoder med väl uppsatta miljö- och hållbarhetsmål som följs genom hela renoveringsprocessen. Ett kritiskt läge är processens slutskede när renoveringsåtgärderna är färdigställda och byggnaden lämnas över till förvaltaren. Syftet med denna studie är därför att dels utvärdera hur dagens hållbarhetsstyrning fungerar i renoveringsprocessens sista skeden, samt att ge förslag på metoder som säkerställer att hållbarhetsfrågor och hållbarhetsmål följs upp och fortskrider in i förvaltningen samt håller över tid.

    Intervjuer med elva företagsrepresentanter från nio fastighetsbolag och två representanter från en bransch- och intresseorganisation tillsammans med litteraturstudier är de metoder som använts i studien.

    Resultatet visar att det finns brister i dagens hållbarhetsstyrning vid överlämning, uppföljning, erfarenhetsåterföring och förvaltning. Det handlar främst om att projektspecifika miljömål inte fortskrider in i förvaltningen samt att rutiner för erfarenhetsåterföring och uppföljning är bristfälliga. Det finns omständigheter och svårigheter som står i vägen för en ambitiösare hållbarhetsstyrning i renoveringsprocessens slutskede. Dessa är identifierade som tekniska, sociala, ekonomiska, administrativa, organisatoriska och psykologiska barriärer. Dock finns det förbättringsmöjligheter för att minimera eller få kontroll över dessa hinder, vilka främst handlar om nya metoder och bättre strukturer.

    Utifrån studiens resultat och slutsatser har en hållbarhetsmanual skapats för att underlätta för berörda aktörer att prioritera och styra hållbarhetsarbetet i renoveringsprocessens slutskede på ett bra sätt där hållbarhetsmål följs upp och fortskrider in i förvaltningen samt håller över tid. 

  • 47.
    Andersson, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Ring, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    The Need for Permanent Mooring Buoys in  the Gulf of Thailand: A Minor Field Study2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the need for permanent mooring buoys at the popular off-shore islands of Pattaya, Thailand. By investigating the ecological, social and economic gains and losses of installing such buoys, the project aims to examine whether such buoys would help support a more sustainable development in the area. In order to fulfil the aims and objectives of the project, a literature study, two different questionnaires, interviews, line intercept transects (LIT) and a boat traffic survey were performed. 

    The results prove that every dive store operator, 71% of the dive instructors/dive masters and 65% of the tourist divers that took part in the interviews or questionnaires have observed anchor damages in the area. This is supported by the results of the LITs, which, although differing greatly between depths, reveal a top score of 44% damaged corals (of which 20% were apparent anchor damages) at snorkelling depth at site 3. At diving depth the damage indexes were generally lower, revealing a top score of 38% damaged corals at Site 2, but no definite anchor damages. The boat traffic survey showed that 192 boats were active in the area, of which 47 used an anchor, during a 3 hour period a Saturday morning. The results also prove that dive store operators and questionnaire participants generally agree that divers wish to see healthy reefs and great aquatic biodiversity when visiting a dive site. The interviews showed that all dive store operators have a positive attitude towards an installation of mooring buoys in the area, which could protect the local reefs and thereby their own business. 85% of the tourist divers that took part in the questionnaires stated they would be willing to pay extra (where a majority of those with a WTP would be willing to pay 7-13 USD) if they could be guaranteed to see healthy coral reefs and a great diversity in species and 88% stated they would be willing to pay extra (where a majority of those with a WTP would be willing to pay 0.7-1.7 USD)  to support a permanent mooring buoy system.  The interviews and the questionnaires also prove that healthy coral reefs hold a special sentimental value, providing invaluable recreational opportunities to humankind. 

    Conclusively the results indicate that there is a need for permanent mooring buoys in the area. The ecological, social and economic gains of installing permanent mooring buoys seem to overshadow the cost of installation and maintenance of the buoys, meaning the buoys would most certainly improve the conditions for a more sustainable development in the area.

  • 48.
    Andersson, Martin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Vindkraftverk med trätorn: Miljöpåverkan och kostnad jämfört med ståltorn2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this report was to research the differences in environmental impact and cost of building wind power turbines using cross-laminated timber (CLT) instead of steel which are commonly used for today’s wind turbine tower. By analyzing data obtained from distributors and related businesses within the market for the production of these two materials environmental impact and costs, a result relevant to the Swedish wood- and wind power market could be obtained.

    The final results showed a 15 times greater total emissions of carbon dioxide equivalents for the steel tower. Even for emissions per MWh showed that steel produced more emissions than the CLT tower. Both the total cost and cost per MWh were lowest for the 100 m CLT tower. Emissions of other hazardous substances were also overall higher for wind turbines using a steel tower. 

  • 49.
    Andersson, Niklas
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Malmös strategi för social hållbarhet med fokus på förorten2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report covers the social sustainability agenda in the suburbs Rosengård and Kroksbäck, situated in Malmö. These suburbs where constructed mainly in the years 1960-1975 and are now in need of refurbishing. There is also a housing shortage in Malmö and the demand is mainly for inexpensive apartments. Young adults, students, immigrants, senior citizens and families alike are looking for places where they can afford to live. The high demand for living space and the need of renovation could spark a gentrification process which would not be socially sustainable. The main actors whose social sustainability agendas are reviewed are the municipality of Malmö and the municipal owned housing company of MKB as well as the tenants’ association. The report also covers how the dialogue between the residents in Rosengård, the civil servants of the city and the landlords is carried out. Reactions from the residents in Rosengård have been researched in newspapers, but it proved hard to find while criminal reports where abundant. Lastly two examples on how the social sustainability agenda have been carried out in Gothenburg is presented. The methodology which the results are based on is a literature review.

    The report finds that both Malmö and Gothenburg are using a matrix formed decision tool in order to incorporate social aspects in all planning decisions. This is something which works well in both cities. The municipality of Malmö took a decision in 2014 that the social justice will increase when building new apartments. They do however realize the most of the newly constructed homes might be too expensive but they hope that this will eventually free up cheaper apartments. Different investment programs have been initiated in Rosengård, Rosengård I förvandling is one of them. Part of this program was based on local farming and different pedagogical activities. MKB are using social clauses when hiring different contractors, they stipulate that ten percent of the workforce should be locals or people who previously have been unemployed. This would be one the few tangible solutions which MKB is contributing with to solving the problem with lack of social sustainability. The tenants’ association is mainly focusing on minimizing the rent increase. They do however see a potential in so called neighborhood effects such as social learning were tenants are affecting other tenants in a positive way. The tennants’ association believes, as do the municipality of Malmö, that this can be achieved partly by constructing new houses among the older ones.

    The dialogue between the residents and the municipality used to be characterized as too little too late in the planning process. The revised aim with the dialogue is now to bring the citizens opinions into the decision process at an earlier stage. A potential problem could be the language barriers as there are many immigrants living in suburban Malmö. However in projects where the dialogue where given a priority the outcome became a success and the decision enjoys a broad support. As a recommendation for future research, a survey or deep interviews with the residents on their thoughts about actions taken to increase the social sustainability could be carried out. This is something which this report is lacking, good feedback from the residents. 

  • 50.
    Andersson, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mapping Uncertainties – A case study on a hydraulic model of the river Voxnan.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis gives an account for the numerous uncertainties that prevail one-dimensional hydraulic models and flood inundation maps, as well as suitable assessment methods for different types of uncertainties. A conducted uncertainty assessment on the river Voxnan in Sweden has been performed. The case study included the calibra-tion uncertainty in the spatially varying roughness coefficient and the boundary condi-tion uncertainty in the magnitude of a 100-year flood, in present and future climate conditions.

    By combining a scenario analysis, GLUE calibration method and Monte Carlo analysis, the included uncertainties with different natures could be assessed. Significant uncer-tainties regarding the magnitude of a 100-year flood from frequency analysis was found. The largest contribution to the overall uncertainty was given by the variance between the nine global climate models, emphasizing the importance of including projections from an ensemble of models in climate change studies.

    Furthermore, the study gives a methodological example on how to present uncertainty estimates visually in probabilistic flood inundation maps. The conducted method of how the climate change uncertainties, scenarios and models, were handled in frequency analysis is also suggested to be a relevant result of the study.

1234567 1 - 50 of 1454
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf